Tag Archives: wikipedia

Wikipedia to file lawsuit challenging mass surveillance by NSA

“Wikimedia Foundation, the nonprofit organization that runs free online encyclopedia Wikipedia, will file a lawsuit against the National Security Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice, challenging the government’s mass surveillance program. The lawsuit, to be filed on Tuesday, alleges that the NSA’s mass surveillance of Internet traffic in the United States — often called Upstream surveillance — violates the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment, which protects freedom of speech and association, and the Fourth Amendment, which protects against unreasonable search and seizure.” (via Reuters)

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Meet the Editors Fighting Racism and Sexism on Wikipedia

“WIKIPEDIA’S GOAL IS to democratize the consumption and creation of knowledge. But dig into just who is creating content on Wikipedia—not to mention what kind of content they’re creating—and you’ll find Wikipedia is far from the egalitarian ideal it set out to be.” (via WIRED)

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Howard University Fills in Wikipedia’s Gaps in Black History

“Wikipedia is a vast ocean of erudition, with entries on virtually every subject, obscure to earth-shattering, and, it may seem, every human being of even vague renown. It is also, its leaders concede, very white. “The stereotype of a Wikipedia editor is a 30-year-old white man, and so most of the articles written are about stuff that interests 30-year-old white men,” said James Hare, president of Wikimedia D.C., the local branch of the foundation that runs Wikipedia. “So a lot of black history is left out.” (via NYTimes.com)

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An easier way to share knowledge through learning patterns

“The Wikimedia movement is increasingly using learning patterns to share what we learn when working on a Wikimedia program (such as an edit-a-thon) or what we learn on an organizational level. These simple documents, that describe solutions to a problem, have become harder to find, as the collection of learning patterns has grown in the past year. The Wikimedia Foundation’s Learning and Evaluation team recently made its Learning Pattern Library easier to navigate. This special library is a shared resource for Wikimedia program leaders and organizations across the world, created to help them find learning patterns that are relevant to them.” (via Wikimedia blog)

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Wellcome Library donates 100,000 medical images to Wikimedia Commons

“The Wellcome Library has donated over 100,000 images on medical history, which have now been uploaded on Wikimedia Commons. The high resolution photographs and scans are used to illustrate a wide range of Wikipedia articles such as disease, art history, cartoons, sexuality and biographies. Wellcome Images provide free public access to their digital collection online, covering topics from medical and social history to current healthcare and biomedical science. Wellcome Images is part of the Wellcome Collection, with an extensive range of manuscripts, archives and films and more than 250,000 paintings, prints and drawings.” (via Wikimedia blog)

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Wikipedia turns 14, receives prestigious Erasmus Prize 2015

“Today, Wikipedia turns fourteen years old. On this day in 2001, a simple idea changed the world: the idea that anyone, no matter who they are or where they lived, had something to contribute to the sum of all human knowledge. It was a simple idea, but intensely powerful, and it resonated with hundreds of thousands of people. Together, your contributions have made Wikipedia the most comprehensive repository of free information in the history of humanity.” (via Wikimedia blog)

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What Wikipedia’s First Users Got Wrong

“These days the real challenge would be finding someone who doesn’t use Wikipedia all the time. But, back in 2003, when TIME first mentioned the word in its pages, the challenge in writing about Wikipedia was explaining what it was. Wikipedia had launched on Jan. 15, 2001 — that’s 14 years ago Thursday — and contained a mere 150,000 entries when TIME explained that “To contribute to wikipedia.org, an online encyclopedia, all you need is Web access.” (via TIME)

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Can Wikipedia Disrupt News As It Did Encyclopedias?

“Wikipedia revolutionized the way people amass information. It provides a free, one-stop shop for the Internet’s collective knowledge on any given topic. Now, one of the site’s founders, Larry Sanger, is launching a ‘Wikipedia for news’ called Infobitt. Infobitt says it will be “the world’s first crowdsourced front page news site.” It calls on users to post news events and aggregate summarized facts for each story. The importance of each fact is determined by votes, which take the form of dragging and dropping the piece of information into a ranking of 10 slots. The collection of facts under each story is called a ‘bitt.’ The importance of each bitt is also voted on in this way.” (via Newsweek)

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Around half of Wikipedia’s medical editors are experts

“Wikipedia is known to be a go-to place for healthcare information for both professionals and the lay public. The first question everyone asks is: but how reliable is it? In a new study, just published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, we took a different approach. We wanted to know more about the people behind the medical pages on Wikipedia, what background do they come from, whether they have specific interests in health and what drives them to contribute to Wikipedia. Because getting health-related content on Wikipedia right is about more than getting the facts correct. It’s about how the information is presented, how topics are covered and what perspectives taken. You can read the paper here: http://www.jmir.org/2014/12/e260” (via Wikimedia blog)

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Wikipedia Is More Biased Than Britannica, but Don’t Blame the Crowd

“The sixth most visited website in the world is an encyclopedia that anyone can edit, managed by a loosely coordinated group of volunteers from around the globe. If the wisdom of the crowd has a poster child, Wikipedia is it. But new research shows that the average Wikipedia article is more politically biased than its Britannica counterpart. That sounds like an indictment of crowdsourcing, but on closer inspection it instead reveals what makes the crowd really work. In a working paper released last month, Shane Greenstein of Kellogg and Feng Zhu of Harvard Business School measured the political bias of Wikipedia and Britannica by counting the number of politically charged words in pairs of articles. Previous research has demonstrated that political partisans use different language. In the U.S., Republicans are more likely to use terms like “illegal immigration” and “border security.” Democrats are more likely to use “war in Iraq”, “civil rights”, or “trade deficit”. These word choices predict the speaker’s ideological slant.” (via Harvard Business Review)

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