Tag Archives: West Virginia

What a Library Levy Means to a West Virginia Town

“I was standing at the front desk of Charleston, West Virginia’s main library on Election Day 2014 when a burly man in worker’s clothes stopped by just to announce to the librarian, “I voted yes on the levy!” It was an important day for the libraries of Kanawha County (pronounced kuh-NAW in Charleston). Passing the levy would mean almost $3 million a year for the next five years, which amounts to about 40 percent of the libraries’ budget for operations and staff. Losing the levy would mean—well, no one even wanted to contemplate that.” (via The Atlantic)

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West Virginia: Library’s $20,000 router cost more than the building

“Public libraries rarely own and operate Internet routers that are worth more than the building in which the library sits. Rather incredibly, however, that was the case for at least one library in West Virginia. The state has been pilloried for using federal funds to buy enterprise-grade Cisco 3945 routers at around $20,000 apiece and then installing them at every “anchor institution” in the state, no matter how small. That led to many ridiculous situations, though the most ridiculous of all may have taken place in the town of Marmet. “The state installed a $22,600 router at the Marmet Public Library, which has a single Internet connection,” according to Charleston Gazette. We covered the Marmet case earlier this week but didn’t realize just how crazy the story was. Thankfully, the paper has the punchline: “The router cost more than the trailer that houses the Marmet Library, according to Kanawha County Commission staff.”

via Ars Technica

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“A bizarre operation”: Why West Virginia stuck $22,600 routers in tiny libraries

Ars Technica – “West Virginia’s Charleston Gazette has been hopping mad this week as one of its reporters learned that the state has been sticking 1,064 high-end $22,600 routers into “little public institutions as small as rural libraries with just one computer terminal.” When reporter Eric Eyre actually called up Cisco posing as a customer, he was told by a rep that the company’s 3945 series routers were “our router solution for campus and large enterprises, so this is overkill for your network.” Instead, the rep recommended a far cheaper commercial grade router for $500. And while the 3945 series routers might be massively overkill for many of the locations to which they have been deployed, 366 of them aren’t even being used. Instead, they’re sitting in a warehouse.”

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