Tag Archives: Studies

People Who Use E-Readers Dive Far Deeper Into Books

“Digital publishing is rapidly becoming a haven for struggling writers—but it turns out the format might hold similar potential for struggling readers too. A new survey by UK charity Quick Reads indicates that adult readers tend to read more and stick with books longer if they’re using an e-reader. According to the survey, 48 percent of UK adults who use e-readers say the technology gets them to read more. In addition to that, 41 percent of respondents reported that being able to look up words they don’t know makes reading easier, and over half say that being able to change the size and appearance of text helps as well.” (via Wired.com)

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BISG Launches Digital Content Subscription Research Study

“The Book Industry Study Group (BISG) is pleased to announce a major new research initiative to study subscription models of selling published content. Given the success of digital subscription services in the film, television, and music industries, publishing industry stakeholders have wondered how and when these services will affect book content distribution. While the range of possible models is vast, it is unclear whether the current needs and trends suggest a “Netflix” model with a deep and broad catalog or whether more focused verticals will continue to develop. And what are the attitudes of agents, authors, publishers, and librarians toward these new distribution models? What factors will motivate or dissuade them from participating?” (via BISG)

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How Americans Value Public Libraries in Their Communities

“Americans strongly value the role of public libraries in their communities, both for providing access to materials and resources and for promoting literacy and improving the overall quality of life. Most Americans say they have only had positive experiences at public libraries, and value a range of library resources and services.” (via Pew Internet Libraries)

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Tablet and E-reader Ownership Update

“The number of Americans ages 16 and older who own tablet computers has grown to 35%, and the share who have e-reading devices like Kindles and Nooks has grown to 24%. Overall, the number of people who have a tablet or an e-book reader among those 16 and older now stands at 43%. Up from 25% last year, more than half of those in households earning $75,000 or more now have tablets. Up from 19% last year, 38% of those in upper-income households now have e-readers.” (via Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project)

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Want To Read Others’ Thoughts? Try Reading Literary Fiction

“Your ability to “read” the thoughts and feelings of others could be affected by the kind of fiction you read. That’s the conclusion of a study in the journal Science that gave tests of social perception to people who were randomly assigned to read excerpts from literary fiction, popular fiction or nonfiction. On average, people who read parts of more literary books like The Round House by Louise Erdrich did better on those tests than people who read either nothing, read nonfiction or read best-selling popular thrillers like The Sins of the Mother by Danielle Steel.” (via NPR)

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Use of Small and Rural Libraries Grows in the Digital Age

“Rural and small public libraries in the United States are community anchors, providing critical services and resources to meet a variety of local needs. The IMLS brief, The State of Small and Rural Libraries in the United States, provides the agency’s first targeted analysis of trends for rural and small library services. The report gives an overview of the distribution, service use, fiscal health, and staffing of these important community assets. One of the report’s surprising findings is the sheer number of public libraries that can be classified as either small or rural.” (via IMLS)

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After weeks of delays, San Jose State U. releases research report on online courses

“San Jose State University on Wednesday quietly released the full research report on the for-credit online courses it offered this spring through the online education company Udacity. The report, marked by delays and procedural setbacks, suggests it may be difficult for the university to deliver online education in this format to the students who need it most.” (via Inside Higher Ed)

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Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations

“Younger Americans—those ages 16-29—exhibit a fascinating mix of habits and preferences when it comes to reading, libraries, and technology. Almost all Americans under age 30 are online, and they are more likely than older patrons to use libraries’ computer and internet connections; however, they are also still closely bound to print, as three-quarters (75%) of younger Americans say they have read at least one book in print in the past year, compared with 64% of adults ages 30 and older.” (via Pew Internet Libraries)

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As Demographics Shift, Kids Books Stay Stubbornly White

“When it comes to diversity, childrens books are sorely lacking; instead of presenting a representative range of faces, theyre overwhelmingly white. How bad is the disconnect? A report by the Cooperative Childrens Book Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that only 3 percent of childrens books are by or about Latinos — even though nearly a quarter of all public school children today are Latino. When kids are presented with bookshelves that unbalanced, parents can have a powerful influence. Take 8-year-old Havana Machado, who likes Dr. Seuss and Diary of a Wimpy Kid. At her mothers insistence, Havana also has lots of books featuring strong Latinas, like Josefina and Marisol from the American Girl Doll books. She says she likes these characters because, with their long, dark hair and olive skin, they look a lot like her.” (via NPR)

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Parents, Children, Libraries, and Reading

“The vast majority of parents of minor children — children younger than 18 — feel libraries are very important for their children. That attachment carries over into parents’ own higher-than-average use of a wide range of library services.” (via Pew Internet Libraries)

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