Tag Archives: Research

ProQuest Study Looks Beyond Journals to Identify What Other Sources Faculty Consult for Research

“In addition to using scholarly journals for active research projects, business faculty rely on materials that share insights and ideas ahead of publication, according to a new study from ProQuest that explores non-journal resources. Business faculty members are using working papers, printed books, pre-prints, conference proceedings and dissertations to explore specific research topics. When asked about passive forms of research — such as staying up-to-date in the field or identifying ideas for further research — newspapers join books at the top of most-used resources.”

via PR Newswire

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The Google Challenge: Google Images versus The Picture Collection

“In September 2015 the Picture Collection, which is located on the third floor of the Mid-Manhattan Branch of The New York Public Library, will celebrate its centennial. The Picture Collection’s origins were closely tied to immigration into New York City at the beginning of the 20th century. Advances in printing and publishing at the time, combined with the population explosion, created an increase in demand from the advertising markets. The need for a specialized collection of images arranged by subject heading quickly became evident and artists and designers requiring specific visual resources turned to the Library for help. The circulation department began collecting images and on September 13, 1915 the Collection opened to the public. Today, almost one hundred years later, professional artists and designers, students, and researchers continue to be inspired by the Picture Collection.”

via TThe New York Public Library Blog

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Presidential Libraries Mark the Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act

“To commemorate the 22nd anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the National Archives is featuring Presidential records related to disability history on a new web research page at [www.archives.gov/research/americans-with-disabilities/]. The ADA was signed by President George H.W. Bush on July 26, 1990 and was the first comprehensive declaration of equality for people with disabilities. The National Archives holds many records that relate to American citizens with disabilities. From personal letters to historic legislation, these records provide insight into efforts over the past century to establish programs and to protect the rights of people with disabilities.”

via National Archives

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Free access to British scientific research to be available within two years

The Government is to unveil controversial plans to make publicly funded scientific research immediately available for anyone to read for free by 2014, in the most radical shakeup of academic publishing since the invention of the internet. Under the scheme, research papers that describe work paid for by the British taxpayer will be free online for universities, companies and individuals to use for any purpose, wherever they are in the world.”

via The Guardian

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Raiders of the lost archives

“In the age of digitisation, the search part of research has become a virtual experience. Although progress has many advantages, John Sutherland laments the end of the scholar-adventurer and the thrill of discovery amid dusty, uncatalogued manuscripts”

via Times Higher Education

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Keep the library open after graduation

“Students’ library cards are a passport to the specialized knowledge found in academic journal articles — covering medicine and math, computer science and chemistry, and many other fields. These articles contain the cutting edge of our understanding and capture the genius of what has come before. In no uncertain terms, access to journals provides critical knowledge and an up-to-date education for tomorrow’s doctors, researchers and entrepreneurs. But should that access cease at graduation? Or would you rather a graduating medical student, perhaps your future doctor, be able to keep up with the latest advances? Would you rather an ambitious graduate student feel comfortable leaving the academy to found the next Google, knowing she still has access to the latest insight in her field and is able to build upon it?”

via The Washington Post.

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Getty launches full text web site for art history research

LA Times.

“When UC Santa Barbara professor Ann Jensen Adams, known for her work on 17th century Dutch painting, was given the chance to try a new research website from the Getty last week, she first typed in the name of a major artist and author in the search field: Karel van Mander. She was surprised to find online a full-text version of Van Mander’s 1604 masterpiece, “Het Schilder-Boeck” (Book of Painters), which attempted to introduce Dutch and German painters like Vasari’s classic “Lives of the Artists” did for so many Italians. “Up came the work on the first hit,” she said. “When I looked at who scanned the text, I realized it had been [online] for a while. But without this portal as a consolidator of information, I never would have found it.”

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Medical Researchers Tune Into the Internet Buzz

WSJ – “Looking for medical information on Internet message boards can be risky for consumers. Some of it is confusing, misleading or downright wrong. But for medical researchers, all that chatter can yield some valuable insights. Scientists from the University of Pennsylvania, for example, are mining message boards and Twitter feeds to see what breast-cancer and prostate-cancer patients are saying about herbal and nutritional supplements—including whether they take them and why and what side effects they encounter.”

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Ancestry.com Publishes the Most Comprehensive Collection of Massachusetts Vital Records Ever Compiled

MarketWatch – “Ancestry.com, the worlds largest online family history resource, today announced that it has added nearly nine million Massachusetts birth, marriage and death records detailing over 330 years of Massachusetts residents to its website. Acquired from the husband and wife research team of Jay and DeLene Holbrook, the records represent the most complete collection of Massachusetts vital records known to exist. Now available exclusively online at Ancestry.com, the collection includes original records for 315 of the states 351 towns from 1620 through 1988. The collection contains important details on Bay Staters through periods significant not just to the history of Commonwealth, but to the entire nation — including the first Pilgrim Thanksgiving in Plymouth and the first battles of the American Revolution in Lexington and Concord.”

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Google Gives Search a Refresh

WSJ.com – “Google Inc. is giving its tried-and-true Web-search formula a makeover as it tries to fix the shortcomings of today’s technology and maintain its dominant market share. Over the next few months, Google’s search engine will begin spitting out more than a list of blue Web links. It will also present more facts and direct answers to queries at the top of the search-results page. The changes to search are among the biggest in the company’s history and could affect millions of websites that rely on Google’s current page-ranking results. At the same time, they could give Google more ways to serve up advertisements.”

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