Tag Archives: Research

AASL’s School Library Research examines social media policies and librarian staffing

“Two new research articles covering the topics of public school district social media policies and the correlation between librarian staffing levels and student learning are now available online as part of the American Association of School Librarians’ (AASL) peer-reviewed online journal, School Library Research (SLR).” (via ALA)

Comments Off on AASL’s School Library Research examines social media policies and librarian staffing

Government shutdown curbs academic research at many levels

“A wide range of academic research across the country, from sophisticated biomedical experiments at the National Institutes of Health to undergraduate political science essays, was being interrupted Wednesday as the federal government shutdown continued for a second day — with no clear path to a resolution. In addition to forcing the closure of government buildings  where research is conducted — such as the Library of Congress and presidential libraries — the shutdown was also cutting off access to myriad electronic resources on which many researchers depend.” (via Inside Higher Ed)

Comments Off on Government shutdown curbs academic research at many levels

Social Media and Archives report details habits and preferences of archival researchers

“Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive Users details findings from a survey of users of archives to learn more about how researchers find out about systems like ArchiveGrid, and the role that social media, recommendations, reviews, and other forms of user-contributed annotation play in archival research. Written by OCLC Research Consulting Software Architect Bruce Washburn, Research Assistant Ellen Eckert, and Senior Program Officer Merrilee Proffitt, this report will be of interest to those working with archival discovery services, or those investigating the utility of social media in discovery environments.” (via OCLC)

Comments Off on Social Media and Archives report details habits and preferences of archival researchers

Census Bureau’s New Tool Puts Congressional District Statistics at Your Fingertips

“The U.S. Census Bureau has released My Congressional District, the first interactive tool geared exclusively toward finding basic demographic and economic statistics for every congressional district in the U.S. This Web app uses the latest annual statistics from the American Community Survey, providing the most detailed portrait of America’s towns and neighborhoods. Users can sort through statistics in five key categories upon selection of a specific district in the application. Summary level statistics covering education, finance, jobs and housing, as well as basic demographic information, can quickly be displayed, downloaded and shared with others. A major feature of the My Congressional District app is the ability to embed a selected 113th congressional district on a user’s own webpage. The embedded district will display the latest statistics from the American Community Survey, allowing visitors to quickly view statistics for any of the 435 congressional districts and the District of Columbia.” (via U.S. Census Bureau)

Comments Off on Census Bureau’s New Tool Puts Congressional District Statistics at Your Fingertips

Inspiring research, inspiring scholarship: the value and benefits of digitised resources for learning, teaching, research and enjoyment

“A new report released by King’s Digital Consultancy Service, written by Simon Tanner.   The research is the product of a JISC funded project to investigate the values, benefits and impacts of digitised resources. This document draws evidence from a wide number of sources and seeks to provide a compelling account of the advantages of digitised content. (via IFLA)

Comments Off on Inspiring research, inspiring scholarship: the value and benefits of digitised resources for learning, teaching, research and enjoyment

New Research Effort Aims to Examine Effectiveness of MOOCs

“As more and more colleges experiment with massive open online courses, or MOOCs, a new project hopes to cut through the hype and gauge the effectiveness of the courses. The MOOC Research Initiative, financed by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, will award grants of $10,000 to $25,000 to researchers seeking to explore issues such as student experiences in MOOCs and the free courses’ systemic impact.” (via The Chronicle of Higher Education)

Comments Off on New Research Effort Aims to Examine Effectiveness of MOOCs

4 New Preprints from CRL

1) Faculty Usage of Library Tools in a Learning Management System

2) Invoking the User from Data to Design

3) YouTube Has Changed Everything”? Music Faculty, Librarians, and Their Use and Perceptions of YouTube

4) Student Involvement for Student Success: Student Staff in the Learning Commons

Comments Off on 4 New Preprints from CRL

Will the Real Dr. Jones Please Stand Up?

“Are you tired of searching for yourself in Google Scholar, Scopus, or Academic Search Complete and finding other people who share your family name? This is a serious problem for researchers, whose reputations rest on their publication history. Many researchers are working on ways to separate the agronomist Dr. Jones from the medical Dr. Jones from the archeologist Dr. Jones. ORCID, a registry that will assign a unique ID to each author, is now live. But assigning a unique ID isn’t going to help unless EVERYONE uses that ID. Up until now, different companies and products have assigned ID numbers to their authors, but nobody else uses those numbers. That’s how authors have ended up with a Scopus ID, a ResearcherID, and a different institutional ID.”

via The Sheridan Libraries Blog

Read the Press Release from Thomson Reuters

Comments Off on Will the Real Dr. Jones Please Stand Up?

ProQuest Study Looks Beyond Journals to Identify What Other Sources Faculty Consult for Research

“In addition to using scholarly journals for active research projects, business faculty rely on materials that share insights and ideas ahead of publication, according to a new study from ProQuest that explores non-journal resources. Business faculty members are using working papers, printed books, pre-prints, conference proceedings and dissertations to explore specific research topics. When asked about passive forms of research — such as staying up-to-date in the field or identifying ideas for further research — newspapers join books at the top of most-used resources.”

via PR Newswire

Leave a Comment

The Google Challenge: Google Images versus The Picture Collection

“In September 2015 the Picture Collection, which is located on the third floor of the Mid-Manhattan Branch of The New York Public Library, will celebrate its centennial. The Picture Collection’s origins were closely tied to immigration into New York City at the beginning of the 20th century. Advances in printing and publishing at the time, combined with the population explosion, created an increase in demand from the advertising markets. The need for a specialized collection of images arranged by subject heading quickly became evident and artists and designers requiring specific visual resources turned to the Library for help. The circulation department began collecting images and on September 13, 1915 the Collection opened to the public. Today, almost one hundred years later, professional artists and designers, students, and researchers continue to be inspired by the Picture Collection.”

via TThe New York Public Library Blog

Comments Off on The Google Challenge: Google Images versus The Picture Collection

© Copyright 2016, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.