Tag Archives: Research

Undergraduates’ Use of Google vs. Library Resources: A Four-Year Cohort Study

“This longitudinal study at a large public university surveyed students of the 2008 freshmen cohort over four years about their use of Web sites and library resources for their research papers. The three goals of the study were to track changes in reported research behavior over time, to see if students’ reported source choices were associated with librarian instruction and/or if they were associated with instructors’ source requirements. The study found that, as students matured, they used library resources more frequently. Librarian instruction and faculty source requirements also were associated with increased use of library resources.” (via ACRL)

Comments Off on Undergraduates’ Use of Google vs. Library Resources: A Four-Year Cohort Study

The Library in the Life of the User: Engaging with People Where They Live and Learn

“This compilation provides a sequential overview of some of our user behavior research findings that articulate the need for the design of future library services to be all about the user.” (via OCLC)

Leave a Comment

Think. Check. Submit launched

“A new cross-industry campaign has been launched – Think. Check. Submit. The campaign aims to provide information for researchers, through an online hub, about the criteria they should look for when selecting where to publish their research. The volume of research output continues to grow, and recent years have seen an increase in new publishing services and outlets. In March of this year, the CrossRef database alone included over 71 million digital object identifiers (DOIs), of which 55 million refer to journal articles from a total of over 36,000 journals. Those behind the campaign say there is little in the way of guidance exists when it comes to choosing a journal to publish in.” (via Research Information)

Comments Off on Think. Check. Submit launched

Don’t Suffer From Library Anxiety: How to Best Research in Libraries

“There’s a name for it. “Library anxiety.” We learned about this in library school. Symptoms: anxiety, uncertainty, sudden shyness, fear, worry that one might seem woefully ignorant, embarrassment, bewilderment, lack of confidence, and perhaps even shame that one should “know better” or already know the answers before the questions are even posed. If not treated, additional more-severe symptoms may develop, including: frustration, despair, a spirit of defeat, giving up, bitterness, and a vow to never do this again (whatever “this” is). (via ancestry.com)

Comments Off on Don’t Suffer From Library Anxiety: How to Best Research in Libraries

Of books, trees, and knowledge

To Ling Guo, a curator for the Beijing Botanic Garden, one of the best places to learn about Chinese crab apples is half a world away, in Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum Horticultural Library. Guo was wrapping up two months at the Arboretum as a visiting scientist and a recipient of the Jewett Prize, which supports researchers studying flowers and fruits. Guo, one of the world’s foremost experts on crab apples, has been creating an updated checklist of all the world’s varieties for use by her home institution as it takes over the rotating role managing the international crab apple registry, which helps monitor and assign names for new varieties.” (via Harvard Gazette)

Comments Off on Of books, trees, and knowledge

What do you get when you cross Google with Wikipedia? Mediander.com

“Mediander.com is aiming to solve the unecessary information overload by aggregating information relevant to what users are searching for with what they call “a knowledge engine powered by your curiosity.” Mediander has various sections that allow people to become better at seeking knowledge and information. There is the Connects page that will show you a topic and then what it’s connected to. There is a Culturemap that uses original content to show interactive perceptions of topics. They also have a bookshop where you can buy books related to the topics for which you are searching.” (via CNET)

Comments Off on What do you get when you cross Google with Wikipedia? Mediander.com

Public libraries get online access to research journals

“Hundreds of thousands of research journal articles are to be made available on computers in public libraries. The Access to Research initiative will give the public access to articles on health, biological research, engineering and social sciences for the first time More than 8,000 journals from around the world are included. It is hoped this will encourage more people to use public libraries. The Publishing Licensing Society (PLS) is behind the scheme.” (via BBC)

Comments Off on Public libraries get online access to research journals

Myth-busting librarians debunk rumors about Texas’ Wild West laws

“Legend has it that the long arm of Texas law once extended to hotel balconies where the men with star badges would take into custody anyone who violated a state statute forbidding people to hunt buffalo from such a perch. The legend ends at the Legislative Reference Library of Texas, where a small team of well-referenced librarians has gone through the records and sorted out fact from fiction when it comes to the laws of the Lone Star State. “The ideas of the history of Texas capture the imagination with those stories of cattle drives and the old West. People want to still think it is like that and those laws are on the books,” said Catherine Wusterhausen, the library’s assistant director.” (via Reuters)

Comments Off on Myth-busting librarians debunk rumors about Texas’ Wild West laws

AASL’s School Library Research examines social media policies and librarian staffing

“Two new research articles covering the topics of public school district social media policies and the correlation between librarian staffing levels and student learning are now available online as part of the American Association of School Librarians’ (AASL) peer-reviewed online journal, School Library Research (SLR).” (via ALA)

Comments Off on AASL’s School Library Research examines social media policies and librarian staffing

Government shutdown curbs academic research at many levels

“A wide range of academic research across the country, from sophisticated biomedical experiments at the National Institutes of Health to undergraduate political science essays, was being interrupted Wednesday as the federal government shutdown continued for a second day — with no clear path to a resolution. In addition to forcing the closure of government buildings  where research is conducted — such as the Library of Congress and presidential libraries — the shutdown was also cutting off access to myriad electronic resources on which many researchers depend.” (via Inside Higher Ed)

Comments Off on Government shutdown curbs academic research at many levels

© Copyright 2016, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.