Tag Archives: Public Libraries

Five years into new building, Central Library a staple of Downtown

“The soaring beams and shiny glass frames of Central Library were more a symbol of controversy than excitement when they welcomed visitors half a decade ago. The expansion of Indianapolis’ aging Downtown library cost nearly $50 million more than projected. Construction problems created a flood of lawsuits. And critics called the new library the Taj Mahal of Downtown Indianapolis, because its glassy exterior felt out of place among the historic monuments and rows of brick buildings in the area.”

via Indianapolis Star

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Libraries can’t use stimulus-funded fiber network

“Librarian Sheila Thorne wishes the 10 computers at the Clay County Public Library wouldn’t bog down during busy afternoons, but it’s not like the slow Internet speeds can be blamed on a shortage of new technology. There’s a new $7,800 high-speed fiber connection in the library’s basement — enough capacity to serve dozens of libraries. And there’s a $22,600 Internet router capable of serving hundreds of computers. But the Clay County library isn’t using the technology — paid for by the federal stimulus. It costs too much.”

via The Charleston Gazette

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Digital age bringing changes to offerings of local libraries

“Patrons continue to stream into Tri-State libraries in large numbers, even as checkouts of printed materials are flat or declining. The Evansville-Vanderburgh Public Library system last week unveiled new branding and some new programs which reflect the impact of the digital age on libraries. Local libraries of all sizes say that transition has been ongoing for several years and will not stop. They say investing in technology is paramount, but as taxpayer-supported entities, they also cited a need to be judicious and “demand-driven,” as EVPL Director Marcia Au put it.”

via Evansville Courier & Press

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The library: home away from home for homeschoolers

“One of the indispensable parts of homeschooling is the public library. I have no idea whether people who make decisions at public libraries take us into account, but we are some of the heaviest users of this system of shared knowledge. No matter their political bent, one way to freak out a homeschooler is to tell her that her local library might lose its funding. I was musing about what my family uses the library for, and how we could better let our local library systems know what we need. It seems to me that homeschoolers could come up with a list of services and products that support homeschooling so that people making decisions about how to fund their local libraries would know what we use.”

via Avant Parenting

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Boulder libraries to allow permit holders to carry guns

“A rule change that will allow concealed-weapon permit holders to bring their guns into Boulder’s public libraries received unanimous approval from the city’s library commission Wednesday night. The Boulder Public Library Commission discussed a new set of rules of conduct last month but heard several questions about rule No. 5, banning weapons inside library facilities. Assistant City Attorney Sandra Llanes then took another look at the rules, according to commission documents.”

via Boulder Daily Camera

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Turns Out Dallasites Love Their Libraries. If Only City Hall Didn’t Hate Them

“There’s a briefing for council today on whether or not our public library system sucks. Looks like the verdict will be that it does not totally suck, but it should, because we do. The briefing is based on a nationwide bench-marking system Dallas participates in with most other second-tier cities in the country, along with some third-tiers and some downright damn suburbs. The survey shows that we care about our libraries, visit them and use them at above average rates.Our visitation per capita, for example, is ahead of Phoenix, San Antonio and Miami-Dade but behind Austin and … no, c’mon. Arlington? They gotta mean Arlington, Virginia. I’ll have to watch. Maybe some sharp councilperson will raise that question. If Arlington, Texas goes to the library more than Dallas, Texas, then just shoot us.”

via Unfair Park

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Santa Clara Libraries Rewire for Online Era – WSJ.com

“Silicon Valley is among the most-wired places in the country. But residents aren’t abandoning their public libraries. “Kids are still coming to the library to do homework and people are still checking out books,” says Nancy Howe, acting county librarian for the Santa Clara County Library District. She adds, though: “One thing about being in Silicon Valley is that it challenges us to adapt more quickly to technology.”

via WSJ

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Director sees library’s role as creation hub

“It may seem odd that when new library director Brad Allen talks about the forthcoming $19 million expansion of the Lawrence Public Library, he often gets most excited about the basement. After all, there will be plenty of other places that are more likely to catch the eye: a new children’s area, an expanded auditorium, an outdoor plaza area, just to name a few. But still, when Allen starts pointing at the stack of blueprints that often are spread out in his office, there’s a decent chance he’ll first point to the basement level.”

via LJWorld.com

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Providence libraries to close for a week in Sept.

“The Providence Community Library System will close its branches for a week in September to make up for a $205,000 cut in city funding. The library system announced it will close Monday, Sept. 10, through Saturday, Sept. 15. Regular hours will resume on Monday, Sept. 17. Officials say employees agreed to forego the library’s normal 401(k) contribution, preventing further cuts in service for patrons.”

via Boston Globe

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Newport libraries can remove anyone who ‘lounges’ or smells bad

“City library employees will now be able to ask people to leave if they interfere with other customers, hang out too long on the sofa or even smell bad. A new policy, approved Tuesday night by a unanimous City Council with Leslie Daigle absent, also has rules against bikes being parked or locked anywhere other than bike racks. The regulations were prompted by concerns about customers who continually misuse the library facilities, argue with staff when confronted about sleeping or lounging on the furniture and parking bikes and shopping carts in front of entrances.”

via The Orange County Register

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