Tag Archives: Public Libraries

Turning A Page Inside A Rural One-Room Library

“There’s one state highway running through Myrtle, Mo. It’s a sleepy town in the Ozarks, population about 300. There’s no bank or restaurant here, but enormous oak and persimmon trees loom over a small stone building right next to the road. Half of it is a post office; the other half, a one-room public library. Rachel Reynolds Luster took over this branch four months ago with the goal of creating a learning hub. She calls herself a curator, not just a librarian. Her first task? Filtering out some of the favorites of the previous librarian.” (via NPR)

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Twin Cities libraries innovate to remain relevant in digital age

“Grace Mwamasika came to Burnsville’s Burnhaven Library on Saturday morning for a free Excel class. A single mother of two, Mwamasika, 45, has an accounting degree and is refreshing her computer skills while she looks for a job. She’s a regular library visitor with her children, and a day earlier she was at a different public library, learning to fill out online job applications.” (via Minn Post)

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San Diego Central Library use soaring

“The newly opened downtown Central Library is a big hit. On its first day of business, the nine-story, $196.7 million landmark drew 8,000 visitors. That’s roughly 10 times the average 700-800 daily users at the old 1954 library on E Street, the Board of Library Commissioners were told at their first monthly meeting in their top-floor commission room.” (via UTSanDiego.com)

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NOW AT YOUR LIBRARY: STREAMING MOVIES, MUSIC

“There’s a new source to stream movies and other digital content, and it’s not a tech company with tens of thousands of titles. It’s something more familiar, and might even be just down the street: the public library. Often thought of as stodgy brick-and-mortar havens for bibliophiles, libraries are trying out a new service that allows patrons to check out streaming movies, music, TV shows and audiobooks from anywhere they want.” (via Associated Press)

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Pretty on outside, library falling apart inside

“To passers-by on Brush Hill Road, the New Fairfield Free Public Library looks picture-perfect and inviting, with yellow marigolds lining the red-brick walkways and lush plantings bordering its exterior. But inside, the 10,000-square-foot building is showing its age. The groaning heating and air-conditioning system has been known to shut down when the weather gets too hot or too cold, an outdated lighting system makes reading difficult in some areas, and there is no way for persons with mobility problems who park in the lower lot behind the building to get to the adult section at street level.” (via Stamford Advocate)

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Welcome to Today’s Totally Modern Library: No ‘Shushing’ Allowed!

“Cards in pockets. Bookmarks keeping pages. The sound of date stamps: Clunk. Ka-chunk. Shhhhhhhhhh! This is the library. Or, well, so I thought. Thanks to a newly-published children’s book of mine, I’ve been spending more time in libraries, both school and public, than I have in years. I do not think that Mr. Dewey, inventor of the classic decimal system for book catalogs, would recognize these places. Long a refuge for quieter adults and kids who like the company of an engrossing page, the libraries I’ve been visiting lately are awash in almost as much noise and activity as a busy Starbucks. When I asked about some loud talking at a neighborhood branch in Providence, where I live, the staffer at the desk looked me up and down. “I don’t ‘shush’ people,” she told me. “That went out with sharpening pencils.” (via Huffington Post)

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An in-depth look at successful social networking in public libraries

“Most commentaries to date on library use of social networks such as Facebook and Twitter have focused on a handful of well-funded public libraries with high-profile employees.  Now Walt Crawford’s “Successful Social Networking in Public Libraries,” published by ALA Editions, completes the picture, offering for the first time an in-depth look at how a large variety of public libraries are conducting digital outreach and marketing through social networking.” (via American Library Association)

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Balto. Co. libraries embrace new technologies, adapt to demographics – baltimoresun.com

Alaina Grubb, 31, wanted to do something stimulating and fun with her young niece and nephew the other day, so she took them to the county library in Woodlawn. Seriously. The library. Specifically, the Arbutus woman took Hayden Grubb, 5, and her 4-year-old brother Lincoln to Storyville, an elaborate, interactive, “magical town” designed for young children from newborns to 5-year-olds. Its great, a wonderful resource, and they love it,” said Grubb, standing in the towns play kitchen watching Hayden arrange plastic pizza slices in a tray and Lincoln stack colorful dishes in a sink. “It gives them a chance to play with things they ordinarily wouldn’t play with.” (via Baltimore Sun.com)

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A Librarian’s Response to ‘What’s a Library?’

“The paint on my worn out ol’ library soapbox is getting rather chipped these days, but I’m about to get back up on it, my friends. Brace yourselves. (The soapbox should probably brace itself too, poor thing.) There are two recent library-related articles on HuffPo to which I’d like to draw your attention. The first article, written by my friend and fellow ULU advocate Christian Zabriske, is an example of how one should write about libraries in the modern age. It’s passionate, it’s coherent, and it’s chock full of relevant and accurate information. (via Rita Meade)

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Library adopts policy on behavior, bills counties

“The Kilbourn Public Library Board of Trustees approved a public behavior policy and billing by the South Central Library System of four counties for $22,269 for use of the library at its monthly meeting May 9. The public behavior policy is to “preserve a reasonably quiet atmosphere where library patrons may use library services and materials without disturbance.” The policy provides that if someone is disturbing others and not responding to the needs of others, that person will be asked to leave and can be restricted from using the library.” (via Wisconsin Dells Events)

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