Tag Archives: privacy

10 nations tell Google of privacy concern on Buzz

AP – “Officials from Germany, Canada, France and seven other countries are raising privacy concerns about Google’s mapping service and the company’s fumbled foray into social networking. Although the concerns they raise are not new, the officials said the online search leader “too often” forgets people’s privacy rights as it rolls out new technologies.”

Read the letter

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Facebook Further Reduces Your Control Over Personal Information

EFF – “Once upon a time, Facebook could be used simply to share your interests and information with a select small community of your own choosing. As Facebook’s privacy policy once promised, “No personal information that you submit to Facebook will be available to any user of the Web Site who does not belong to at least one of the groups specified by you in your privacy settings.” How times have changed.”

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Some Yahoo email accounts hacked in China, Taiwan

Reuters – “Yahoo email accounts of some journalists and activists whose work relates to China were compromised in an attack discovered this week, days after Google announced it would move its Chinese-language search services out of China due to censorship concerns. Several journalists in China and Taiwan found they were unable to access their accounts beginning March 25, among them Kathleen McLaughlin, a freelance journalist in Beijing. Her access was restored on Wednesday, she told Reuters.”

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Facebook changes continue to chip away at privacy

ComputerWorld – “If proposed changes to the Facebook Privacy Policy go through next month the social network will store financial account information you use to make purchases on its site unless you tell it not to.”

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Indicted Cop Tests Facebook’s Privacy Rights

Courthouse News – “A judge is weighing whether Facebook’s right to privacy trumps a man’s rights to discovery for his defense in a criminal trial. At issue is a motion from the attorney for former St. Louis City police Officer Bryan Pour, who authorities say used his department-issued pistol to shoot Jeffrey Bladdick in a bar parking lot. The motion seeks disclosure from Facebook of 23 individual user profiles and the actions of a Facebook group called “Jeff Bladdick is a bulletproof badass” going back to the day before the Nov. 9, 2008 incident.”

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Big Brother Is Here: Families Say Schools Snoop in Their Homes With District-Issued Laptops & Webcams

Courthouse News – “A federal class action claims a suburban school district has been spying on students and families through the “indiscriminant use of and ability to remotely activate the webcams incorporated into each laptop issued to students,” without the knowledge or consent of students or parents.”

Read the complaint

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Police push for warrantless searches of cell phones

CNET – “When Christian Taylor stopped by the Sprint store in Daly City, Calif., last November, he was planning to buy around 30 BlackBerry handhelds. But a Sprint employee on the lookout for fraud grew suspicious about the address and other details relating to Taylor’s company, “Hype Univercity,” and called the police. Taylor was arrested on charges of felony identity fraud, his car was impounded, and his iPhone was confiscated and searched by police without a warrant. A San Mateo County judge is scheduled to hear testimony on Thursday morning in this case, which could set new ground rules for when police can conduct warrantless searches of iPhones, laptops, and similarly capacious electronic gadgets.”

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Privacy commissioner probing Google Buzz

CBC – “Concerns around Google’s recently unveiled Buzz feature are deepening with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada looking into the social-networking tool. Valerie Lawton, a spokesperson for the office, said on Tuesday that Buzz is being investigated to see whether it violates Canadian privacy laws.”

See also, this article from AP

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Tweeting a book by its cover

Cnet – “a new project from non-profit biannual magazine Slice, based in Brooklyn, tries to show us that something is lost on a Kindle commute. Meet CoverSpy, a Twitter feed run by Slice, which peeks at the books that people are reading on the New York City subway (as well as on park benches and some other gathering places) and tweets them along with some basic, anonymous detail about the reader and a link to the cover.”

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Controversial App Provides Background Checks On the Go

PC World – “Online privacy is a constant and growing concern as the evolving landscape of Web sites and services erode the traditional expectations of privacy. A new app from BeenVerified is adding even more controversy to the privacy dilemma by enabling users to conduct background checks on anyone in a matter of seconds from their iPhone.”

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