Tag Archives: privacy

Arizona bill would expand library privacy law

“A bill advancing in the Arizona Legislature would add protections for ebook readers under the state’s existing library privacy law.A Senate panel is expected to move the bill forward Monday. The House passed the measure in a 57-1 vote in early March.The measure seeks to include digital books under material protected by the state law that prohibits the disclosure of public library records.” (via AP)

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E-Readers Track How We Read, But Is The Data Useful To Authors?

“Reading always seemed to be the most private of acts: just you and your imagination immersed in another world. But now, if you happen to be curled up with an e-reader, you’re not alone. Data is being collected about your reading habits. That information belongs to the companies that sell e-readers, like Amazon or Barnes & Noble. And they can share — or sell — that information if they like. One official at Barnes & Noble has said sharing that data with publishers might “help authors create even better books.” The data is also, of course, a brilliant marketing tool. Best-selling author Scott Turow says e-readers can collect a lot of information about their owners.”

via NPR

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Who’s Tracking Your Reading Habits? An E-Book Buyer’s Guide to Privacy, 2012 Edition

“The holiday shopping season is upon us, and once again e-book readers promise to be a very popular gift. Last year’s holiday season saw ownership of a dedicated e-reader device spike to nearly 1 in 5 Americans, and that number is poised to go even higher. But if you’re in the market for an e-reader this year, or for e-books to read on one that you already own, you might want to know who’s keeping an eye on your searching, shopping, and reading habits. Unfortunately, unpacking the tracking and data-sharing practices of different e-reader platforms is far from simple. It can require reading through stacked license agreements and privacy policies for devices, software platforms, and e-book stores. That in turn can mean reading thousands of words of legalese before you read the first line of a new book.”

via Electronic Frontier Foundation

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Your E-Book Is Reading You

“It takes the average reader just seven hours to read the final book in Suzanne Collins’s “Hunger Games” trilogy on the Kobo e-reader—about 57 pages an hour. Nearly 18,000 Kindle readers have highlighted the same line from the second book in the series: “Because sometimes things happen to people and they’re not equipped to deal with them.” And on Barnes & Noble’s Nook, the first thing that most readers do upon finishing the first “Hunger Games” book is to download the next one. In the past, publishers and authors had no way of knowing what happens when a reader sits down with a book. Does the reader quit after three pages, or finish it in a single sitting? Do most readers skip over the introduction, or read it closely, underlining passages and scrawling notes in the margins? Now, e-books are providing a glimpse into the story behind the sales figures, revealing not only how many people buy particular books, but how intensely they read them.

via WSJ

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Calif. Extends Library Privacy Laws to E-Books

PC Mag – “California Governor Jerry Brown this week signed into law a bill that will extend privacy protections currently in place for library records to book purchases, including e-books. The bill, known as the Reader Privacy Act of 2011, will require government agencies to obtain a court order before they access customer records from book stores or online retailers. It will officially become law on January 1.”

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Calif. bill protects customers’ reading records

AP – “Government agencies would have to get a warrant or court order to obtain customers’ reading records from bookstores and online booksellers, under a bill approved by the state Senate. The legislation by Sen. Leland Yee is patterned after similar privacy protections that currently are in place for library records. The bill, SB602, passed the Senate unanimously and without debate Monday. It now goes to the Assembly.”

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On the Web, Children Face Intensive Tracking

WSJ – “A Wall Street Journal investigation into online privacy has found that popular children’s websites install more tracking technologies on personal computers than do the topwebsites aimed at adults.”

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Request For Amazon User Records Unconstitutional, Says ACLU

ACLU – “The American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU of North Carolina today sent a letter to North Carolina Secretary of Revenue Kenneth Lay reiterating concern over a recent request by the state Department of Revenue (NCDOR) for the private records of Amazon.com customers. The letter informs Lay that the ACLU will take legal action on behalf of North Carolina residents who are Amazon.com customers if NCDOR persists in its demand for their constitutionally protected private information. Specifically, the letter says the ACLU and its clients will intervene in an existing lawsuit brought by Amazon.com to stop NCDOR from collecting individually identifiable information that could be linked to specific purchases made on Amazon.com.”

More here

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Kids These Days…They Absolutely Care About Privacy

ACLU – “Company bigwigs who want to use our personal online information justify their actions by telling us that young people don’t care about privacy. In January, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg claimed that privacy is no longer a “social norm,” just after and just before Facebook significantly curtailed user privacy (yet again). Last year, Walt Disney CEO Robert Iger didn’t mince words when he simply said “kids don’t care” about privacy.”

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10 nations tell Google of privacy concern on Buzz

AP – “Officials from Germany, Canada, France and seven other countries are raising privacy concerns about Google’s mapping service and the company’s fumbled foray into social networking. Although the concerns they raise are not new, the officials said the online search leader “too often” forgets people’s privacy rights as it rolls out new technologies.”

Read the letter

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