Tag Archives: Overdue

Agreement ends prosecution in Tecumseh’s overdue library book case

“Prosecutors and defense attorneys wrote a “happy” ending Tuesday to a delinquent Tecumseh District Library book case. Criminal misdemeanor charges against a Tecumseh couple for failure to return rented property were dismissed in Lenawee County District Court. Defendants Melvin and Catherine Duren paid all delinquent book fees and the replacement cost of a Dr. Seuss book they were unable to find.” (via The Daily Telegram)

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Michigan Couple Arraigned on Larceny Charges for Late Library Books

“Two overdue library books have landed a married couple in Tecumseh, Michigan, afoul of the law. Not only have the husband and wife been fined more than $200, but they were arraigned in court Thursday, each charged with larceny of rental equipment. “We were appalled, totally appalled,” Catherine Duren, 44, told ABC News today. “We didn’t commit a crime.” (via ABC News)

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[Wisconsin] Assembly passes bill allowing libraries to take late fees to collections

“The state Assembly has passed a bill permitting libraries to report borrowers who owe late fees to collections agencies, or in some cases, to law enforcement.The bill passed on a voice vote during a marathon Assembly session Tuesday.It allows a library to report delinquent accounts to a law enforcement agency if the delinquency is at least $50. Information that may be disclosed is the individual’s name, contact information and the amount owed.” (via Madison.com)

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This Library System Is Willing to Forgive Your Fine…Just This Once 

“If you’ve ever failed to return a library book, you’re not alone—even George Washington was a library scofflaw. And if you live in Los Angeles, you can return your books without fear of a fine for the next two weeks, regardless of how long you’ve had them checked out. It’s all part of an increasing trend of library amnesty programs aimed at welcoming forgetful or unlucky patrons back into the fold. The Los Angeles Public Library’s amnesty period, which lasts from February 1 through February 14, is as much an attempt to regain lost patrons as lost books. “Nothing can keep us apart, not even late fees,” announces the library on its website, in a Valentine’s Day-tinged message about its amnesty program.” (via Smithsonian)

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Baltimore writer returns overdue library book 34 years late

“When faced with the unenviable task of going through her late mother’s personal effects, Baltimore-area writer Michele Wojciechowski uncovered something she hadn’t seen in over three decades. While rooting through a cabinet over her mother’s refrigerator, she discovered an old paperback copy of “Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein,” adapted and illustrated by Alice and Joel Schick. The thrill of an unexpected find was quickly tempered by a horrific realization: Ms. Wojciechowski had checked out the book from the nearby Enoch Pratt Free Library Southeast Branch’s Branch when she was 13. That was in 1981.” (via Washington Times)

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Library’s book detective has a 30-year-old mystery

“After 30 years at Waterloo Public Library, Deb Reinhart is so good at bounty hunting books that purloined or misplaced tomes find her on their own. “We kid her she’s our Mr. Bookman,” said colleague Sandi Hall, referring to a Seinfeld episode about a crusty library cop on the trail of Jerry’s overdue book from 1971.”She’s our book detective.” (via durhamregion.com)

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Book thieves stole 70,144 books from the Brooklyn Public Library in 2012

“Book thieves checked out but never returned 70,144 books from Brooklyn Public Library’s 60 cash-strapped branches in 2012, records show. GED prep guides, nursing and other professional exam cliff notes were high on the list of frequently filched books — but so too were graphic novels, library officials said. “Those are always going missing,” a librarian at the Brooklyn Heights branch told the Daily News Thursday.” (via NY Daily News)

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Judge: Bloomfield library violated records law

“The Bloomfield Public Library violated New Jersey’s Open Public Records Act when it failed to produce documents pertaining to overdue materials, Superior Court Judge Edith K. Payne ruled on Jan. 13. In July 2013, Bloomfield Life requested documents specifically regarding the library board’s 11 trustees at the time. They included Board President Sharon McIver, Jeremiah Larkin Jr., Louis Acocella, Mary Todaro, Susan Carter, Kathleen Hughes, Rosemary Vetrano, Patricia Pelikan, Raymond McCarthy, Ted Ehrenburg and Nicholas Dotoli. Pelikan, McCarthy and Dotoli are no longer on the board.” (via NorthJersey.com)

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UNRETURNED LIBRARY BOOKS CAN MEAN JAIL TIME

“Call it throwing the book at the bookworms. A Texas man who was arrested for failing to return an overdue library book ignited an online flurry of snarky comments and headlines about the Lone Star State extending its tough-on-crime bravado to books. But such cases aren’t unheard of, and many communities faced with shrinking budgets and rising costs have ordinances calling for fines or even arrest warrants when library property isn’t returned.” (via The Associated Press)

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Jailed for overdue library books? Not in Grand Rapids anymore

“An ordinance that provided for a penalty of up to 30 days in jail for failing to return a library book is being expunged from the city code. Grand Rapids City Commission is in the process of repealing part of a “disorderly conduct” ordinance that spells out the following punishments for “any person who detains or fails to return” books or other library items: a fine of $10 to $50 or imprisonment for 7 to 30 days, or both.” (via MLive.com)

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