Tag Archives: Open Access

Generation Gap in Authors Open Access Views and Experience, Reveals Wiley Survey

“John Wiley & Sons, Inc., today announced the results of its 2013 author survey on open access, with over eight thousand respondents from across Wiley’s journal portfolio. The survey is a follow up to Wiley’s 2012 open access author survey and is the second such survey conducted by Wiley. This year new sections were added including research funding and article licenses. Consistencies were seen between the 2012 and 2013 surveys in authors’ desire to publish in a high-quality, respected journal with a good Impact Factor, but the survey also shed light on differences between early career researchers respondents between the ages of 26-44 with less than 15 years of research experience and more established colleagues in their opinions on quality and licenses.  Differences were also seen across funding bodies and in the funding available for open access to different author groups.” (via Wiley)

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Open-access journals confuse contributors as they experiment with peer review models

“Just because scholars who seek to publish in open-access journals are open to new forms of peer review, that doesn’t mean they all see eye-to-eye — or know what to expect. As one sting operation shows, many such journals are unable to reject obviously flawed submissions, even as they promise thorough review processes. Meanwhile, other journals are even criticized for being too much like the traditional publishing they aim to reform.” (via Inside Higher Ed)

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A Fresh Take on Open Access

“The worldwide movement to bring scholarly work and other knowledge within reach of all those wishing to access it has gained momentum at Washington University in recent years, most notably with the adoption of an Open Access Resolution by the Faculty Senate in 2011 and the creation of a digital repository at http://openscholarship.wustl.edu. But a need for greater awareness of open access remains, and librarians on campus are providing a series of activities in October to promote open access ideas and resources as they relate to scholarly publishing and other endeavors. A video shorts contest aimed specifically at students is already underway, with three prizes of $500 each to be awarded to creations of five minutes or less in three categories. Sponsored by Washington University Libraries, the Access Granted Video Shorts 2013 Contest is the inaugural run of what organizers hope will become an annual competition. All undergraduate and graduate students are eligible to participate, with submissions due by Monday, Oct. 14. Four judges—volunteers from among the Washington University faculty and staff—will choose the winners, who will be announced in late October.” (via Washington University Libraries)

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Non-Profit “Free Law Project” Provides Open Access to US Case Law

“Although case law is technically public domain, the legal decisions that interpret and apply statutory law are often scattered across the Internet, locked up in proprietary systems, and only available by paying exorbitant fees. A new non-profit launching this week aims to make these legal materials easily and freely available to all.

School of Information assistant professor Brian Carver and alumnus Michael Lissner (MIMS 2010) founded the Free Law Project to support open access to the law and to develop open-source legal research tools.” )via Berkeley School of Information)

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University Library and campus partners jump-start open access publishing at IUPUI

“The University Library and key campus partners have started a fund to support the publication of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis scholarship in peer-reviewed open access journals. A pilot program that encourages diverse participation across schools on the campus will make $47,000 available to IUPUI faculty over the next two years. The IUPUI Open Access Fund will underwrite reasonable publication charges for articles published in fee-based, peer-reviewed journals that are openly accessible. This fund addresses changes in scholarly communications while increasing the impact of and access to scholarship created by IUPUI faculty. Key campus stakeholders, including the IUPUI University Library, the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, IU School of Dentistry and the Robert H. McKinney School of Law, are providing the financial backing for the fund.” (via IUPUI)

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Open Content, An Idea Whose Time Has Come

“Today the Getty becomes an even more engaged digital citizen, one that shares its collections, research, and knowledge more openly than ever before. We’ve launched the Open Content Program to share, freely and without restriction, as many of the Getty’s digital resources as possible. The initial focus of the Open Content Program is to make available all images of public domain artworks in the Getty’s collections. Today we’ve taken a first step toward this goal by making roughly 4,600 high-resolution images of the Museum’s collection free to use, modify, and publish for any purpose.” (via The Getty Iris)

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University of California Academic Senate approves open access policy

“The Academic Senate of the University of California has passed an Open Access Policy, ensuring that future research articles authored by faculty at all 10 campuses of UC will be made available to the public at no charge. “The Academic Council’s adoption of this policy on July 24, 2013, came after a six-year process culminating in two years of formal review and revision,” said Robert Powell, chair of the Academic Council. “Council’s intent is to make these articles widely — and freely — available in order to advance research everywhere.” Articles will be available to the public without charge via eScholarship (UC’s open access repository) in tandem with their publication in scholarly journals. Open access benefits researchers, educational institutions, businesses, research funders and the public by accelerating the pace of research, discovery and innovation and contributing to the mission of advancing knowledge and encouraging new ideas and services.” (via University of California)

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Despite warnings that young scholars could be doomed by open access dissertations, evidence is mixed

Even though the American Historical Association is warning that young scholars could be denied book deals and therefore tenure-track jobs if they do not keep their dissertations off the Internet, the actual danger of such career hampering remains hard to quantify. (via Inside Higher Ed)

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Stanford responds to looming open-access directive

“With the explosive growth in scientific publishing, access to scientific research papers and data has become an increasingly complex affair. Stanford’s Forum on the Future of Scientific Publishing on June 27 brought together a diverse group of stakeholders to exchange information about open access to manuscripts and big data. The Forum was held in response to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) memorandum directing expanded public access to the results of government-funded research.  The February 2013 memo requires federal agencies sponsoring more than $100 million in annual research expenditures “to develop plans to make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication… Such results include peer-reviewed publications and digital data.” Furthermore, the memo states that data repositories could be maintained either by the federal government or “scholarly and professional associations, publishers and libraries.” The memo directed federal agencies to provide the OSTP with their draft policies by August 22.” (via Stanford University Libraries)

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Publishers, universities both prep open access plans

“Scholarly publishers want to keep hosting taxpayer-funded research that will soon be made public free of charge. The publishers unveiled a plan to do so Tuesday by arguing they could save the federal government money. The plan also allows publishers to keep at least a piece of a pie they now own. Research universities are also planning to unveil their own system in coming weeks that would have them, not publishers, as the main hosts of open-access research funded by about 15 federal agencies.” (via Inside Higher Ed)

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