Tag Archives: NYPL

The New York Public Library To Offer Pop Up Reading Room Outside Iconic 42nd Street Building

“The New York Public Library is kicking some of its key services to the curb this summer – and is inviting the public to take advantage.For nearly two weeks in August, the Library will offer an outdoor reading room outside of its landmark Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, located at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street. “The Library Inside Out: Read Everywhere” will be open from Tuesday, August 5 until Friday, August 15, staffed by dedicated volunteers and offering wi-fi, books recommended by librarians, library card sign ups, and a seating. All readers are welcome in the space, which is being offered in partnership with Bryant Park Corporation and will be open from Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., weather permitting.” (via The New York Public Library)

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NY Public Library Pilots Program to Rent Out Free Wifi

“Libraries are known for lending books. Libraries have recently also become known as a place to use computers and the internet. Now though, libraries are combining the two in their latest effort to try to close the so-called “Digital Divide”—made up of those who do and do not have access to the internet. The New York Public Library recently completed a pilot project during which certain patrons were able to check out wireless routers giving them free, unlimited internet access at home.” (via NY1)

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The big city library as Internet provider

“As our Brian Fung detailed last week, some of the United States’ bigger urban library systems have begun lodging a public protest against the formula federal rulemakers are considering for the distribution of billions of dollars for wireless Internet infrastructure. The Federal Communications Commission is thinking of divvying up so-called E-Rate funds to libraries based on square footage rather than users or some other metric, a calculation that city libraries argue gives an unfair advantage to their more sprawling suburban counterparts. And now perhaps the biggest name in the U.S. public libraries has dipped into the debate.” (via The Washington Post)

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New York Public Library Looks at Innovative Models for Renovation

“The New York Public Library is looking south for inspiration as it goes back to the drawing board for a planned renovation of its landmark Fifth Avenue building and the branch across the street. Library officials say they are considering two innovative libraries in Tennessee and North Carolina as models for creating high-tech, collaborative spaces. Chattanooga Public Library’s “4th Floor” is a so-called maker space stocked with 3-D printers and even a loom. North Carolina State University’s James B. Hunt Jr. Library in Raleigh features writable surfaces on walls and tables, and massive video screens for displaying data.” (via WSJ)

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New York Public Library Receives First City Funding Increase In Six Years

“The New York Public Library will receive a $4.4 million increase in city operating funds for Fiscal Year 2015, according to the new city budget, unveiled today by Mayor Bill de Blasio, City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, and the New York City Council. The increase – the first for the system since Fiscal Year 2008 – brings NYPL’s total city operating budget to about $144 million. It is part of a $10 million increase in funding to all three of the city’s Library systems, including the Brooklyn Public Library and Queens Library.” (via The New York Public Library)

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Book Collector Shares His Passion for Liberty With New York Public Library

“As Sid Lapidus sees it, he has only a few options for his extensive collection of books and pamphlets centered around the theme of liberty in American history.He can sell the collection, which he amassed over more than 50 years, donate it or keep it in the family. But his children aren’t particularly interested, said Mr. Lapidus, who is 76 years old, and he has no interest in selling it off piecemeal. So his plan now is to “creatively give it away,” he said in an interview Wednesday.On the receiving side of that plan will be the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. On Thursday, it will announce that Mr. Lapidus and his wife, Ruth, are giving the center $2.5 million—the largest donation in its history—along with a cache of rare historic books and other texts from his collection related to the topic of slavery.” (via WSJ)

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The New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Receives Single Largest Individual Gift In Its History

“The New York Public Library today announced the single largest individual gift ever made to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem. The $2.5 million gift from Ruth and Sid Lapidus will establish and endow the Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Trans-Atlantic Slavery, the only facility of its kind based in a public research library. The Center – which will be housed within the Schomburg Center’s Scholars in Residence program – will focus on the interdisciplinary and transnational study of the slave trade, slavery, and anti-slavery pertaining to people of the Atlantic World.” (via NYPL)

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Library Reveals Details and Costs of Upgrade Plan

“New York Public Library’s revised renovation plan — to upgrade the Mid-Manhattan Library and create more public space in its flagship Fifth Avenue building — is expected to cost about $300 million, according to library officials who outlined new details of the project in interviews. The anticipated budget matches what the library had originally suggested its previous plan — to insert a circulating branch at its main library at 42nd Street — might cost.” (NYTimes.com)

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Q&A: Library President on Failed Renovation Plan

“When it was announced last week that the New York Public Library was suddenly scrapping its ambitious and embattled plan to gut-renovate its iconic central branch and move many of its books to New Jersey, we had a lot of questions. Did the reversal have anything to do with the turnover at City Hall from development-happy Bloomberg to de Blasio, who’d protested the so-called Central Library Plan as public advocate? If ballooning cost estimates were the culprit, as library president Tony Marx conceded, how much had they risen from the projected $300 million, and why did it take an independent survey to discover that? What would eventually be done with the library stacks, which remain intact but unusable? Marx, who’s made the renovation a keystone of his tenure at the library, agreed to our Q&A, but only by email, and only after the questions were severely pared down. In the intervening week, he’s kept most interviews off the record and limited extensive comment to an essay in the Library Journal — a smooth blend of calm explication and revisionist history that, like the planning itself, falls a little short of real transparency.” (via NYMag)

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The Huxtable New York Public Library

“It’s fair to say that the New York Public Library’s announcement last week that it is scrapping its controversial renovation plan probably never would have happened but for the efforts of Ada Louise Huxtable, the Journal’s late architecture critic. In 2008, the library announced a plan of consolidation and renovation that called for selling the Mid-Manhattan circulating library and the Science, Industry and Business branch, their functions to be absorbed into the Stephen A. Schwarzman building on Fifth Avenue, the library’s flagship facility and principal research arm. To make room, seven floors of stacks under its Rose Main Reading Room would be demolished, the books divided between existing storage in New Jersey and new storage under Bryant Park. The projected cost was $300 million, with slightly more than half coming from the city of New York.” (via WSJ.com)

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