Tag Archives: Maine

Cutting funds for Maine’s libraries is the wrong way to save money

“America’s first lending library was started by Benjamin Franklin in 1731. And the statesman’s revolutionary advocacy of sharing information resources continues to inform the spirit of the approximately 260 public libraries in Maine. But too many of Maine’s libraries are battling to stay alive, funding their operations with private donations, volunteer hours and the proceeds of fundraising book and pie sales. Public libraries account for a tiny share of government spending in proportion to the value of the services they offer, and the small amount of money that local and state officials save by reducing library funding doesn’t justify depriving residents of the critical resources and services that libraries provide.” (via The Portland Press Herald)

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Bangor Public Library close to fundraising goal

“With part of the new copper roof installed and other restoration plans in place, the Bangor public library is getting close to reaching its fundraising goal. But it’s not quite there yet. After receiving money from more than a thousand donors, the library is just $13,000 shy of its $9 million goal. It quickly hit $6 million with a bond from the city and a donation from Stephen and Tabitha King, but the rest has been up to donations from the people of the Bangor area (via WLBZ2)

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Maine libraries write new chapter on lending

“So here’s the dilemma: You’ve been asked to bake a cake shaped like a dinosaur for a child’s birthday, but you’re hesitant to spend money on a pan you’ll use only once.What to do? If you live in New Gloucester, the answer is easy. Go to the New Gloucester Public Library and simply check the pan out, just like you would a book or DVD. And while you’re there, peruse the other 46 specialty cake pans the library has in its collection, including Dora the Explorer and a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle.” (via The Portland Press Herald)

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Maine schools, libraries see few attempts to ban books

“If a book features sexual content or homosexuality, profanity or racial slurs, magic or violence, chances are someone has tried to have it removed from a library shelf or school reading list. Every year there are hundreds of challenges to books or other materials by people who want to see them barred from libraries or classrooms — a fact that libraries have highlighted this week during Banned Books Week, the American Library Association’s annual celebration of the freedom to read. Many schools and public libraries in the Augusta area have received complaints about certain books, but they rarely have risen to the level of a formal challenge, according to librarians and other officials.” (via Portland Press Herald)

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Tabitha and Stephen King Foundation Award Grants

“During the month of August several Maine libraries reported receiving news that they had been awarded grants from the Stephen and Tabitha King Foundation. Once again, Maine libraries are so fortunate to benefit from the generosity of this Foundation. Libraries have shared with us their delight in learning that their library was a recipient of a grant from the Kings in this latest round of awards. Keep in mind that the list includes only those libraries that shared this information with the Maine State Library.” (via Maine State Library)

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Stephen King, wife pledge $3M to Maine library

“Stephen King and his wife have agreed to pay $3 million to overhaul their century-old hometown library in Maine, as long as $6 million is raised from other sources. Tabitha King, the author’s wife, serves on the building committee of the Bangor Public Library, which is planning a $9 million modernization. She’s also a former longtime board member.” (via AP)

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Technology in libraries improves access to the legal system

“Patrons of Maine’s public libraries will soon have a chance to hear from experts on a number of legal issues at no charge. Low income people may be able to confer one-on-one with those experts, again at no cost. The reason is what’s becoming known as “Lawyers In Libraries.” It’s an outreach effort coordinated by the Volunteer Lawyers Project, or VLP. A grant allows VLP to arrange clinics by video conference; a lawyer speaks in real time at one location while people at libraries across the state watch and listen. After the lawyer’s presentation, viewers can ask general questions about the law, although the lawyer cannot serve as a questioner’s legal representative.” (via Bangor Daily News)

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