Tag Archives: LOC

New Twitter Feed, @TeachingLC, Launches

“Sharing ideas is a critical part of all great teaching, and now the Library of Congress has a new tool for exchanging ideas with the nation’s K-12 teachers: @TeachingLC, its new Twitter feed for educators. The Library’s Director of Educational Outreach, Lee Ann Potter, hailed the launch. “Teachers and librarians use Twitter to discover new ideas and inspiration, and we at the Library are happy to be joining the conversation. @TeachingLC will be a great venue for educators to learn from each other and to explore the primary sources and teaching resources offered by the Library of Congress.” (via Library of Congress Blog)

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At Library of Congress, changes are afoot in technology as well as in physical space

“The Library of Congress no longer needs the computer room that visitors once used to search its electronic card catalogue. These days the entire library has a wireless Internet connection, so workers this summer put a collection of old microfilm machines in that room instead. Meanwhile, the library’s old-school physical catalogues, the kind filled with carefully penned index cards, have long since been relegated to cool basement hallways where schoolchildren marvel at their obscurity.” (via The Washington Post)

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Library of Congress acts as America’s hard drive

“There’s more than one site for the Library of Congress, and some of its campuses can be pretty far outside of the Beltway and off the beaten path, while still serving an important job. Located 70 miles southwest of D.C., the Library of Congress’s Packard Campus is in Culpeper, Va. In a thick, sturdy building that makes you feel as if you’re perpetually in some sort of “LOST” bunker (it actually was built as an apocalypse bunker during the Cold War), it is ground zero for the library’s efforts to digitize and save every TV program, movie, CD and album in American history. Even video games and the occasional YouTube clip. Although it’s unlikely that they’ll bother with your 2009 vacation video, it’s not impossible either. (via POLITICO)

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Library of Congress races to preserve TV history

The 2014 National Agenda for Digital Stewardship is now available!

“The National Agenda for Digital Stewardship annually integrates the perspective of dozens of experts and hundreds of institutions, convened through the Library of Congress, to provide funders and executive decision?makers insight into emerging technological trends, gaps in digital stewardship capacity, and key areas for funding, research and development to ensure that today’s valuable digital content remains accessible and comprehensible in the future, supporting a thriving economy, a robust democracy, and a rich cultural heritage” (via LOC)

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Library of Congress Turns to Avere for Data Storage

“Avere Systems, the leader in network-attached storage (NAS) optimization, has announced today that the Library of Congress has selected the company to increase the efficiency and performance of its storage infrastructure. The Library of Congress website and file repositories will be supported by Avere’s FXT Series Edge Filers, enabling congressional and public users quick access to valuable content. “The Avere FXT Series, with its ability to deliver up to 150 TB of Flash in a single cluster, was built to address the difficulty of providing fast and scalable access to large amounts of content typified by the Library of Congress data environment,” said Ron Bianchini, president and CEO, Avere Systems. “This is a tremendous achievement for Avere and we are excited that our products are helping the Library of Congress deliver its massive data stores to users.” (via Avere)

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Library Transitions to Online Cataloging Publications

“The Library of Congress has announced a transition to online-only publication of its cataloging documentation. As titles that are in production are released, the Library’s Cataloging Distribution Service (CDS) will no longer print new editions of its subject headings, classification schedules and other cataloging publications. The Library will instead provide free downloadable PDF versions of these titles. For users desiring enhanced functionality, the Library’s two web-based subscription services, Cataloger’s Desktop and Classification Web, will continue as products from CDS.” (via Library of Congress)

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Natasha Trethewey Appointed To Second Term

“Librarian of Congress James H. Billington has appointed Natasha Trethewey to serve a second term as U.S. Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry. “The Library and the country are fortunate Natasha Trethewey will continue her work as Poet Laureate,” said Billington. “Natasha’s first term was a resounding success, and we could not be more thrilled with her plans for the coming year.” (via Library of Congress)

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LIBRARY HONORS CAROLE KING WITH US POP MUSIC PRIZE

“Carole King isn’t done with music – not yet anyway.

The 71-year-old singer-songwriter known for such hits as “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” and “You’ve Got A Friend” was awarded the nation’s highest prize for popular music in a concert Tuesday. She received the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song at the Library of Congress and will be honored Wednesday by President Barack Obama at the White House” (via Associated Press)

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Budget Cuts Hobble Library of Congress

“The Sea Creatures, who recently sent their recording “Naked in the Rain” to the Library of Congress, probably did not ponder the impact of sequestration on their music’s journey from dream to copyright. Just as military contractors, air traffic controllers and federal workers are coping with the grim results of a partisan impasse over the federal deficit, the Library of Congress, whose services range from copyrighting written works — whether famous novels or poems scribbled on napkins — to the collection, preservation and digitalization of millions of books, photographs, maps and other materials, faces deep cuts that threaten its historic mission.” (via NYTimes.com)

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