Tag Archives: LOC

Cinema with the Right Stuff Marks 2013 National Film Registry

“Heroes of the space race, a pop cult classic; the age-old battle between the sexes; and a record of Native-American traditions are among a cadre of films being recognized as works of great cultural, historic or aesthetic significance to the nation’s cinematic heritage. The Librarian of Congress, James H. Billington, announced today the annual selection of 25 motion pictures to join the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. They will be preserved as cinematic treasures for generations to come. “The National Film Registry stands among the finest summations of more than a century of extraordinary American cinema,” said Billington. “This key component of American cultural history, however, is endangered, so we must protect the nation’s matchless film heritage and cinematic creativity.” (via Library of Congress)

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STUDY FINDS MOST US SILENT FILMS HAVE BEEN LOST

“The vast majority of feature-length silent films made in America have been lost due to decay and neglect over the past 100 years, allowing an original 20th century art form to all but disappear, according to a study released Wednesday. The Library of Congress conducted the first comprehensive survey of silent films over the past two years and found 70 percent are believed to be lost. Of the nearly 11,000 silent feature films made in America between 1912 and 1930, the survey found only 14 percent still exist in their original format. About 11 percent of the films that survive only exist as foreign versions or on lower-quality formats.” (via The Associated Press)

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LIBRARY TO PRESERVE ARCHIVE OF PUBLIC BROADCASTING

“Early interviews with John F. Kennedy, Hubert Humphrey and Ronald Reagan are part of a collection of public broadcast recordings dating to the 1950s that will now be preserved at the Library of Congress. Under a project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and announced Thursday, 40,000 hours of radio and television content is being digitized for long-term preservation at the library. It will become the American Archive of Public Broadcasting and will be housed at the library’s National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in underground vaults in Culpeper, Va.” (via The Associated Press)

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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS ACQUIRES CARL SAGAN’S PAPERS

“Astronomers and scientists are joining Seth MacFarlane at the Library of Congress for the opening of a new collection of Carl Sagan’s papers. The library has acquired the late astronomer’s papers with a donation from MacFarlane, the creator of TV’s “Family Guy.” Sagan’s widow and collaborator, Ann Druyan, will join the dedication Tuesday, along with astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, Bill Nye and others.” (via The Associated Press)

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New LOC Blog – Welcome to Folklife Today

“Today we welcome the  newest member of the Library of Congress blogosphere: Folklife Today, a new blog produced by the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. AFC has one of the largest archives in the world relating to traditional folk culture.  The center’s team of bloggers will be posting regularly with interesting information about its collections and services and other folklore and folklife topics of interest.” (via Library of Congress Blog)

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Library of Congress and FTC will take their sites offline if gov’t shuts down

“With the possibility of an American federal government shutdown looming next week as the result of the debt-ceiling crisis, at least some government websites are going dark, including the Library of Congress and the National Park Service. It’s not exactly clear why some sites in Washington, DC, would go offline and others would stay online, nor is it clear how shutting down a government website would save any significant amount of money. “In the event of a temporary shutdown of the federal government, beginning Tuesday, October 1, all Library of Congress buildings will close to the public and researchers,” the Library of Congress wrote on its website on Friday. “All public events will be cancelled and websites will be inaccessible.” (via Ars Technica)

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Library of Congress Service Launches App to Bring Materials to Blind Readers

“Karen Keninger remembers fondly the carefully wrapped packages of braille books delivered to the doorstep of her childhood home in Vinton, Iowa, from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped. “It was like Christmas,” recalls Keninger, who was diagnosed with an eye disease at 16 months old. By the age of 7, her vision had deteriorated to the point where she lost the ability to read large-print books. “I would get excited every time the mail came because I loved reading,” she said.” (via Roll Call Hill Life)

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TROVE OF MICH. FOLK MUSIC UNEARTHED IN ARCHIVE

“Detroit is famous for its music, from the Motown hits of the 1960s to the cutting-edge punk of Iggy Pop to the rap of Eminem. Little known, though, is that Michigan was also fertile ground for folk music, brought to the region by immigrants in the early 20th century and played in the logging camps, mines and factory towns where they worked. Legendary folklorist Alan Lomax discovered the music in 1938 when he visited the Midwest on his famous 10-year cross-country trek to document American folk music for the Library of Congress. A trove of his Michigan recordings is now being publicly released for the first time by the library, coinciding with the 75th anniversary of Lomax’s trip. The release is causing a stir among folk music fanciers and history buffs.” (via The Associated Press)

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Rubenstein Donates $5 Million to Book Festival

“David M. Rubenstein, co-founder and co-CEO of The Carlyle Group, announced his donation of an additional $5 million ($1 million per year for the next five years) to support the Library of Congress National Book Festival, bringing his total support since 2010 for the free public event held yearly since 2001 to $10.3 million. The announcement came as the 2013 festival opened for the second of its two days on the National Mall. Event organizers estimated attendance at this year’s event at more than 200,000. This year’s festival featured talks and book-signings by 112 authors, poets and illustrators.” (via Library of Congress)

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Gettysburg museum butts heads with Library of Congress over copy of Lincoln’s speech

“Officials in Gettysburg are hoping to borrow one of the nation’s most historic documents — an original copy of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. The foundation that runs Gettysburg National Military Park’s museum and visitor center wants to borrow a copy held by the Library of Congress and put it on public display as part of its celebration of the 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s famed speech. Pennsylvania Sen. Robert Casey wrote to the library Tuesday expressing his support of the plan.” (via NY Daily News)

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