Tag Archives: LOC

Library of Congress Service Launches App to Bring Materials to Blind Readers

“Karen Keninger remembers fondly the carefully wrapped packages of braille books delivered to the doorstep of her childhood home in Vinton, Iowa, from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped. “It was like Christmas,” recalls Keninger, who was diagnosed with an eye disease at 16 months old. By the age of 7, her vision had deteriorated to the point where she lost the ability to read large-print books. “I would get excited every time the mail came because I loved reading,” she said.” (via Roll Call Hill Life)

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TROVE OF MICH. FOLK MUSIC UNEARTHED IN ARCHIVE

“Detroit is famous for its music, from the Motown hits of the 1960s to the cutting-edge punk of Iggy Pop to the rap of Eminem. Little known, though, is that Michigan was also fertile ground for folk music, brought to the region by immigrants in the early 20th century and played in the logging camps, mines and factory towns where they worked. Legendary folklorist Alan Lomax discovered the music in 1938 when he visited the Midwest on his famous 10-year cross-country trek to document American folk music for the Library of Congress. A trove of his Michigan recordings is now being publicly released for the first time by the library, coinciding with the 75th anniversary of Lomax’s trip. The release is causing a stir among folk music fanciers and history buffs.” (via The Associated Press)

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Rubenstein Donates $5 Million to Book Festival

“David M. Rubenstein, co-founder and co-CEO of The Carlyle Group, announced his donation of an additional $5 million ($1 million per year for the next five years) to support the Library of Congress National Book Festival, bringing his total support since 2010 for the free public event held yearly since 2001 to $10.3 million. The announcement came as the 2013 festival opened for the second of its two days on the National Mall. Event organizers estimated attendance at this year’s event at more than 200,000. This year’s festival featured talks and book-signings by 112 authors, poets and illustrators.” (via Library of Congress)

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Gettysburg museum butts heads with Library of Congress over copy of Lincoln’s speech

“Officials in Gettysburg are hoping to borrow one of the nation’s most historic documents — an original copy of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. The foundation that runs Gettysburg National Military Park’s museum and visitor center wants to borrow a copy held by the Library of Congress and put it on public display as part of its celebration of the 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s famed speech. Pennsylvania Sen. Robert Casey wrote to the library Tuesday expressing his support of the plan.” (via NY Daily News)

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There’s an App for This: The Constitution

“The Senate Committee on Rules and Administration, the Library of Congress and the Government Printing Office (GPO) mark Constitution Day today by launching a new app and web publication that make analysis and interpretation of constitutional case law by Library experts accessible for free to anyone with a computer or mobile device. The new resources, which include analysis of Supreme Court cases through June 26, 2013, will be updated multiple times each year as new court decisions are issued. Legal professionals, teachers, students and anyone researching the constitutional implications of a particular topic can easily locate constitutional amendments, federal and state laws that were held unconstitutional, and tables of recent cases with corresponding topics and constitutional implications.” (via Library of Congress)

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New Twitter Feed, @TeachingLC, Launches

“Sharing ideas is a critical part of all great teaching, and now the Library of Congress has a new tool for exchanging ideas with the nation’s K-12 teachers: @TeachingLC, its new Twitter feed for educators. The Library’s Director of Educational Outreach, Lee Ann Potter, hailed the launch. “Teachers and librarians use Twitter to discover new ideas and inspiration, and we at the Library are happy to be joining the conversation. @TeachingLC will be a great venue for educators to learn from each other and to explore the primary sources and teaching resources offered by the Library of Congress.” (via Library of Congress Blog)

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At Library of Congress, changes are afoot in technology as well as in physical space

“The Library of Congress no longer needs the computer room that visitors once used to search its electronic card catalogue. These days the entire library has a wireless Internet connection, so workers this summer put a collection of old microfilm machines in that room instead. Meanwhile, the library’s old-school physical catalogues, the kind filled with carefully penned index cards, have long since been relegated to cool basement hallways where schoolchildren marvel at their obscurity.” (via The Washington Post)

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Library of Congress acts as America’s hard drive

“There’s more than one site for the Library of Congress, and some of its campuses can be pretty far outside of the Beltway and off the beaten path, while still serving an important job. Located 70 miles southwest of D.C., the Library of Congress’s Packard Campus is in Culpeper, Va. In a thick, sturdy building that makes you feel as if you’re perpetually in some sort of “LOST” bunker (it actually was built as an apocalypse bunker during the Cold War), it is ground zero for the library’s efforts to digitize and save every TV program, movie, CD and album in American history. Even video games and the occasional YouTube clip. Although it’s unlikely that they’ll bother with your 2009 vacation video, it’s not impossible either. (via POLITICO)

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Library of Congress races to preserve TV history

The 2014 National Agenda for Digital Stewardship is now available!

“The National Agenda for Digital Stewardship annually integrates the perspective of dozens of experts and hundreds of institutions, convened through the Library of Congress, to provide funders and executive decision?makers insight into emerging technological trends, gaps in digital stewardship capacity, and key areas for funding, research and development to ensure that today’s valuable digital content remains accessible and comprehensible in the future, supporting a thriving economy, a robust democracy, and a rich cultural heritage” (via LOC)

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