Tag Archives: LOC

E.L. Doctorow Awarded American Fiction Prize

“E. L. Doctorow, author of such critically acclaimed novels as “Ragtime,” “World’s Fair,” “Billy Bathgate,” “The March” and his current novel, “Andrew’s Brain,” is the second recipient of the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction. He will receive the award during this year’s National Book Festival, scheduled for Aug. 30 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The annual Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction is meant to honor an American literary writer whose body of work is distinguished not only for its mastery of the art but for its originality of thought and imagination. The award seeks to commend strong, unique, enduring voices that—throughout long, consistently accomplished careers—have told us something about the American experience. Winning the award last year was author Don DeLillo.” (via Library of Congress Blog)

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US library launches ‘Songs of America’ online

“The Library of Congress is opening a new digital collection of the “Songs of America” to help teach the nation’s history through music. The library’s new free online resource launched this week. It includes 80,000 digitized items, including recordings, videos, sheet music, essays, biographies, maps and curator talks.” (via AP)

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A Half Century of Library Computing

“Fifty years ago, the Library installed its first computer and began charting a course to bibliographic control and global shared access. On Jan. 15, 1964, the first components of a small-scale computer system were delivered to the Library of Congress and installed in the Library’s newly established Data Processing Office. Provided for in the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act of 1964 (P.L. 88-248), the IBM 1401  was intended for use in payroll, budget control, card distribution billing, accounting for book and periodical purchases and to produce various statistical and management reports.” (via Library of Congress Blog)

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Nonprofit Suing Library of Congress Loses Appeal

“The Library of Congress should not face claims over its refusal to recognize a nonprofit as an employee organization, the D.C. Circuit ruled. The Howard R.L. Cook & Tommy Shaw Foundation for Black Employees of the Library of Congress sued a librarian at the Library of Congress after he denied recognizing them as an employee organization in 2008. The decision denied the group benefits that are afforded to recognized employee organizations, which include the right to host activities using Library facilities and posting materials on the Library’s bulletin boards.” (via Courthouse News Service)

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Cinema with the Right Stuff Marks 2013 National Film Registry

“Heroes of the space race, a pop cult classic; the age-old battle between the sexes; and a record of Native-American traditions are among a cadre of films being recognized as works of great cultural, historic or aesthetic significance to the nation’s cinematic heritage. The Librarian of Congress, James H. Billington, announced today the annual selection of 25 motion pictures to join the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. They will be preserved as cinematic treasures for generations to come. “The National Film Registry stands among the finest summations of more than a century of extraordinary American cinema,” said Billington. “This key component of American cultural history, however, is endangered, so we must protect the nation’s matchless film heritage and cinematic creativity.” (via Library of Congress)

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STUDY FINDS MOST US SILENT FILMS HAVE BEEN LOST

“The vast majority of feature-length silent films made in America have been lost due to decay and neglect over the past 100 years, allowing an original 20th century art form to all but disappear, according to a study released Wednesday. The Library of Congress conducted the first comprehensive survey of silent films over the past two years and found 70 percent are believed to be lost. Of the nearly 11,000 silent feature films made in America between 1912 and 1930, the survey found only 14 percent still exist in their original format. About 11 percent of the films that survive only exist as foreign versions or on lower-quality formats.” (via The Associated Press)

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LIBRARY TO PRESERVE ARCHIVE OF PUBLIC BROADCASTING

“Early interviews with John F. Kennedy, Hubert Humphrey and Ronald Reagan are part of a collection of public broadcast recordings dating to the 1950s that will now be preserved at the Library of Congress. Under a project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and announced Thursday, 40,000 hours of radio and television content is being digitized for long-term preservation at the library. It will become the American Archive of Public Broadcasting and will be housed at the library’s National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in underground vaults in Culpeper, Va.” (via The Associated Press)

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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS ACQUIRES CARL SAGAN’S PAPERS

“Astronomers and scientists are joining Seth MacFarlane at the Library of Congress for the opening of a new collection of Carl Sagan’s papers. The library has acquired the late astronomer’s papers with a donation from MacFarlane, the creator of TV’s “Family Guy.” Sagan’s widow and collaborator, Ann Druyan, will join the dedication Tuesday, along with astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, Bill Nye and others.” (via The Associated Press)

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New LOC Blog – Welcome to Folklife Today

“Today we welcome the  newest member of the Library of Congress blogosphere: Folklife Today, a new blog produced by the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. AFC has one of the largest archives in the world relating to traditional folk culture.  The center’s team of bloggers will be posting regularly with interesting information about its collections and services and other folklore and folklife topics of interest.” (via Library of Congress Blog)

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Library of Congress and FTC will take their sites offline if gov’t shuts down

“With the possibility of an American federal government shutdown looming next week as the result of the debt-ceiling crisis, at least some government websites are going dark, including the Library of Congress and the National Park Service. It’s not exactly clear why some sites in Washington, DC, would go offline and others would stay online, nor is it clear how shutting down a government website would save any significant amount of money. “In the event of a temporary shutdown of the federal government, beginning Tuesday, October 1, all Library of Congress buildings will close to the public and researchers,” the Library of Congress wrote on its website on Friday. “All public events will be cancelled and websites will be inaccessible.” (via Ars Technica)

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