Tag Archives: LOC

Billy Joel to Receive Gerswhin Prize

“Librarian of Congress James H. Billington today announced that Billy Joel is the next recipient of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. Billy Joel ranks as one of the most popular recording artists and respected entertainers in the world. His piano-fueled narratives take listeners into the relatable and deeply personal moments of life, mirroring his own goal of writing songs that “meant something during the time in which I lived … and transcended that time.” “Scenes From an Italian Restaurant,” “The Entertainer,” “Piano Man,” “Big Shot,” “New York State of Mind,” “You May Be Right,” “It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me,” “Allentown,” “Uptown Girl” and “The Downeaster ‘Alexa’” are among many other classics in a rich and deep catalog of songs that have acted as personal and cultural touchstones for millions of people.” (via Library of Congress)

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Library of Congress to Display Interviews With Blacks, Noted and Unsung

“Maya Angelou’s earliest childhood memory took place on a train when she was 3 years old. When her brother, Bailey, whom she described as “my black kingdom come,” went to the bathroom, Ms. Angelou thought he had been taken away by a porter. “It scared me to death,” she recounted in a video interview recorded in 2010. “I wasn’t afraid that my mother wouldn’t come back or my father or anyone else. It was always Bailey.” The small details of everyday life and more profound events that get to the heart of the black experience in America are part of an ambitious video history called The HistoryMakers that will become part of the Library of Congress, the library is expected to announce Tuesday. The collection includes 9,000 hours of video interviews with 2,600 African-Americans in more than 35 states.” (via NYTimes.com)

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Let’s Get Pinning! – Library of Congress Launches Account on Pinterest

“Today the Library of Congress launched its own Pinterest account, continuing efforts to make educational, historical and cultural resources available to web users across many platforms. With Pinterest, the Library can share visual content with a wide audience, allowing them to also curate their own collections featuring the same content by creating and managing “boards” and “pinning” items. Each pin links back to the original Library source material.” (via Library of Congress Blog)

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Library Of Congress Searches For Missing Jefferson Books

“Staffers at the Library of Congress have been looking for 250 books that belonged to Thomas Jefferson. He gave these books and several thousand more to start the library more than 200 years ago.” (via NPR)

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E.L. Doctorow Awarded American Fiction Prize

“E. L. Doctorow, author of such critically acclaimed novels as “Ragtime,” “World’s Fair,” “Billy Bathgate,” “The March” and his current novel, “Andrew’s Brain,” is the second recipient of the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction. He will receive the award during this year’s National Book Festival, scheduled for Aug. 30 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The annual Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction is meant to honor an American literary writer whose body of work is distinguished not only for its mastery of the art but for its originality of thought and imagination. The award seeks to commend strong, unique, enduring voices that—throughout long, consistently accomplished careers—have told us something about the American experience. Winning the award last year was author Don DeLillo.” (via Library of Congress Blog)

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US library launches ‘Songs of America’ online

“The Library of Congress is opening a new digital collection of the “Songs of America” to help teach the nation’s history through music. The library’s new free online resource launched this week. It includes 80,000 digitized items, including recordings, videos, sheet music, essays, biographies, maps and curator talks.” (via AP)

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A Half Century of Library Computing

“Fifty years ago, the Library installed its first computer and began charting a course to bibliographic control and global shared access. On Jan. 15, 1964, the first components of a small-scale computer system were delivered to the Library of Congress and installed in the Library’s newly established Data Processing Office. Provided for in the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act of 1964 (P.L. 88-248), the IBM 1401  was intended for use in payroll, budget control, card distribution billing, accounting for book and periodical purchases and to produce various statistical and management reports.” (via Library of Congress Blog)

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Nonprofit Suing Library of Congress Loses Appeal

“The Library of Congress should not face claims over its refusal to recognize a nonprofit as an employee organization, the D.C. Circuit ruled. The Howard R.L. Cook & Tommy Shaw Foundation for Black Employees of the Library of Congress sued a librarian at the Library of Congress after he denied recognizing them as an employee organization in 2008. The decision denied the group benefits that are afforded to recognized employee organizations, which include the right to host activities using Library facilities and posting materials on the Library’s bulletin boards.” (via Courthouse News Service)

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Cinema with the Right Stuff Marks 2013 National Film Registry

“Heroes of the space race, a pop cult classic; the age-old battle between the sexes; and a record of Native-American traditions are among a cadre of films being recognized as works of great cultural, historic or aesthetic significance to the nation’s cinematic heritage. The Librarian of Congress, James H. Billington, announced today the annual selection of 25 motion pictures to join the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. They will be preserved as cinematic treasures for generations to come. “The National Film Registry stands among the finest summations of more than a century of extraordinary American cinema,” said Billington. “This key component of American cultural history, however, is endangered, so we must protect the nation’s matchless film heritage and cinematic creativity.” (via Library of Congress)

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STUDY FINDS MOST US SILENT FILMS HAVE BEEN LOST

“The vast majority of feature-length silent films made in America have been lost due to decay and neglect over the past 100 years, allowing an original 20th century art form to all but disappear, according to a study released Wednesday. The Library of Congress conducted the first comprehensive survey of silent films over the past two years and found 70 percent are believed to be lost. Of the nearly 11,000 silent feature films made in America between 1912 and 1930, the survey found only 14 percent still exist in their original format. About 11 percent of the films that survive only exist as foreign versions or on lower-quality formats.” (via The Associated Press)

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