Tag Archives: Libraries

More than just books: Arizona libraries add public health nurses

“Public libraries have long been the go-to place to borrow books, attend classes or log on to public computers. But over the last decade, they have also become shelters for people in need, including the mentally ill, battered women, latchkey kids and new immigrants. Acknowledging that reality, libraries in Tucson, Ariz., have become the first in the nation to provide registered nurses along with their other services. Placing nurses in six branches is a nod to the widely accepted transition of public libraries into de facto community centers.” (via TODAY Health)

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Library Copyright Alliance Statement on Supreme Court Decision in Kirtsaeng v Wiley

“Today the US Supreme Court announced its much-anticipated decision in Kirtsaeng v. Wiley, a lawsuit regarding the bedrock principle of the “first sale doctrine.” The 6-3 opinion is a total victory for libraries and our users. It vindicates the foundational principle of the first sale doctrine—if you bought it, you own it. All who believe in that principle, and the certainty it provides to libraries and many other parts of our culture and economy, should join us in applauding the Court for correcting the legal ambiguity that led to this case in the first place. It is especially gratifying that Justice Breyer’s majority opinion focused on the considerable harm that the Second Circuit’s opinion would have caused libraries.” (via Association of Research Libraries)

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Libraries offer weird things to draw new borrowers

“This spring, your next packet of garden seeds may come not from a hardware store or nursery, but from your local public library.Fighting to stay relevant in the digital age, public libraries have taken to lending all manner of weird and wonderful items: hand tools, baking pans, fishing poles, telescopes and knitting needles, among others. Dont like the memoir offerings at your local branch? Bring a USB thumb drive, plug it in at one of several massive Espresso Book Machines and print a hard-cover copy of your own memoir — or any other obscure title the library doesnt keep on hand.”

via USA Today

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Massive Fiber-Optic Installation Lights Up Library Queries

“Getting a glimpse into the curious minds of others has never been so beautiful – or so bright. Designers Brian W. Brush and Yong Ju Lee of E/B Office New York created an extensive fiber-optic installation for the Teton County Library grand opening in Wyoming that visualizes library searches in flashes of colored light. Dubbed Filament Mind, the installation, which opened at the end of January, uses over five miles of fiber-optic cables and 44 LED illuminators to collect, categorize, and render searches from libraries all across the state of Wyoming into glowing bursts of color.”

via Wired Design

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The future of libraries? In Japan, elevated study pods encourage conversation

“It can sometimes be difficult to find absolute silence in a library if a noisy student or two decide to be chatty. But that’s not really needed at Japan’s Seikei University thanks to the building’s ingeniously designed isolation spheres (pictured above). Referred to as ‘planets’ these modernly designed elevated rooms can be used for meetings or for group work. Such a futuristic environment certainly looks like an inspiring place for young minds to develop! But why bother to go to such lengths to create these isolation rooms? The sole purpose was to create a new type of library where speaking was not prohibited. In a traditional library, students come in to find books that they’re looking for, and then they proceed to read or work quietly. Seikei University wanted to reinvent their library into a space where students have discussions and exchange opinions about their books.”

via Startup Dating

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The Underground Library

(via adrants)

San Jose to open first of four new libraries mothballed by budget cuts

“In recent years, four newly built but mothballed branch libraries stood as stark evidence of San Jose’s budget mess, built with bond proceeds voters approved more than a decade ago by a city that could no longer afford to staff them. On Saturday, the first of those four new branch libraries, Seven Trees, is set to finally celebrate its grand opening.

“People have been waiting a long time for it to open,” said Anne Cain, San Jose’s interim library director. “It will make a huge difference in this community.” The city’s original Seven Trees library opened in 1967. It was closed in 2008 and demolished to make way for the new version, which occupies the upper floor of a new Seven Trees Community Center that opened in September 2011.”

via Contra Costa Times

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Bookless library good for county

“For those who love to read, there is no such thing as having access to too many books. Bexar County commissioners’ plan to launch the first bookless public library system in the nation is commendable. It will expand the availability of books, albeit electronically, to sectors of our community that have long had to do without adequate access to libraries. For bibliophiles, nothing can replace the feel of holding a bound book and being able to physically turn the pages. But technology is changing the way we do many things.”

via San Antonio Express-News

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Looting books from Palestinian libraries: Dark stories

“IN THE dark rooftop viewing space of the Khalil Al Sakakini Cultural Centre in Ramallah, the air was heavy with sighs. Occasionally the faint sound of a whimper could be heard. The screen flickered with images of Palestinians forced out of their homes in the 1948 war. On camera, refugees recounted their ordeals and lamented the loss of something precious: their books. This was the Ramallah debut of “The Great Book Robbery”, a 2012 documentary about the looting of some 70,000 books from private Palestinian libraries during the 1948 war. It vividly chronicles the large-scale cultural pillage and dispossession of Palestinian literary archives. Directed by Benny Brunner, a Dutch-Israeli immigrant and self-described former Zionist, the film left the 40 or so attendees in awe. Adding to the poignance, the audience was gathered in a centre named for a famous Palestinian poet and scholar whose own book collection had been looted.”

via The Economist

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Library Services in the Digital Age

“The internet has already had a major impact on how people find and access information, and now the rising popularity of e-books is helping transform Americans’ reading habits. In this changing landscape, public libraries are trying to adjust their services to these new realities while still serving the needs of patrons who rely on more traditional resources. In a new survey of Americans’ attitudes and expectations for public libraries, the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project finds that many library patrons are eager to see libraries’ digital services expand, yet also feel that print books remain important in the digital age.”

via Pew

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