Tag Archives: Libraries

Scranton woman helps library adapt to changing world

“Elizabeth Davis walks in undiscovered country these days.The Scranton resident is the first to hold the recently created job of digital services librarian at Scranton Public Library, giving her a chance – and the responsibility – to figure out what the job can and should be. “It’s a little terrifying, actually,” she said with a laugh. Miss Davis started the new position in June, moving from Lackawanna County Children’s Library, where she worked for several years and had been children’s outreach coordinator.” (via The Times-Tribune)

Comments Off

As academic libraries cull their printed collections, they find bigger audience outside their walls

“Shelves and shelves of books sit mostly ignored, taking up space. Thousands of tomes now seem like relics instead of resources. They contribute more to the decor and ambiance of a college library than the use of it – afterthoughts for the Millennials who hunker down to study there. Rooted quite literally by name in books, academic libraries are now backing out of the hard-copy business. But unlike many traditional institutions facing revolutionary shake-ups, experts say libraries are relishing the information age and digital transformation. Instead of existing to house static collections of scholarly journals waiting to be pulled for review, academic libraries are finding more opportunities to push information out beyond their walls.” (via Indianapolis Star)

Leave a Comment

A Bookless Library Opens in San Antonio

“Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff isn’t the man you’d imagine as the visionary for the nation’s first all-digital public library. The former San Antonio mayor doesn’t own an e-reader (“I refuse to read the e-book!” he says) and for years has collected first editions of modern novels (in print, mind you). Back in the 1990s, Wolff helped spearhead San Antonio’s 240,000 square-foot, six-story, $50 million central public library, a building the city is now struggling to figure out what to do with. Today, Wolff says he would’ve avoided building such a large facility. “Who would’ve thought 20 years ago we’d be where we are today?” he says.

via TIME)

Leave a Comment

With Modern Makeovers, America’s Libraries Are Branching Out

“It’s not exactly a building boom, but several public libraries around the country are getting makeovers. The Central Library in Austin, Texas just broke ground on a new building that promises such new features as outdoor reading porches and a cafe. In Madison, Wis., they’re about to open a newly remodeled library that has, among other improvements, more natural light and a new auditorium. Historic libraries in Boston and New York City are looking at significant renovations.” (via NPR)

Comments Off

New Toronto library: great architecture, great view

“Toronto’s newest library, its 99th, is set to open in November. The Fort York Library, an unusual, modern building with what looks like a crazy tilted roof, offers a rare view of its namesake, Fort York. It’s a historic site we rarely see unless stalled in traffic high up on the Gardiner Expressway. The library, still under construction, rises up on the east side of the Bathurst Street bridge. It’s an elegant glass pavilion that will glow like a welcoming lantern at night. It’s such a presence that the neighbourhood of condominium towers and community housing has been named by the developer, Context, in its honour: the Library District.” (via Toronto Star)

Comments Off

Libraries for Afghan women are Scots aid worker’s legacy

“The Linda Norgrove Foundation will set up the scheme after receiving a grant of nearly £500,000 from the United States International Development Agency (USAID), specifically to fund the establishment of the libraries and literacy schemes for women and girls.

Some 840 women will receive literacy classes and more than 20,000 people are expected to use the community libraries being set up by Afghanistan Reads, a community literacy project supported by the Norgrove Foundation. Literacy in Afghanistan is among the lowest in the world. It is estimated only 20% of women are literate and the figure is three times lower in rural areas.” (via Herald Scotland)

Comments Off

Nothing to read? Airport libraries to the rescue

“It’s appropriate that a book celebrating the 75th anniversary of Nashville International Airport includes a page — and a charming photo — documenting the library branch that opened on-site in 1962. Staffed by a librarian who received an extra $4 in her paycheck to cover airport parking, the Nashville Public Library reading room was the first time a public library was ever established in a municipal airport.” (via USA Today)

Comments Off

For You To Borrow, Some Libraries Have To Go Begging

“More than 90 percent of Americans say public libraries are important to their communities, according to the Pew Research Center — but the way that love translates into actual financial support varies hugely from state to state. Vermont, for instance, brags it has more libraries per capita than any other U.S. state. And some of them are remarkably quaint. In Ludlow, one library is a white clapboard Victorian, slightly frayed, ringed by lilies and sitting by the side of a brook.” (via NPR)

Comments Off

At Libraries Across America, Its Game On

“According to a study published in Library Journal last year, about 15 percent of libraries in the U.S. currently lend games to cardholders to take home. But other research shows that gaming in the library is far more prevalent — and teenagers game the most. Sandy Farmer is the manager of Central Youth Services for the Houston Public Library, which has four Nintendo Wiis, four Xboxes, several Nintendo DSs, some iPads, seven PlayStations and a few big-screen TVs. “Its a primary part of our service that we offer, and it results in a 15- to 20-percent increase in the circulation of books,” Farmer says.” (via NPR)

Comments Off

E-Books Strain Relations Beween Libraries, Publishing Houses

“E-books have changed the world of publishing in fundamental ways. The business model that encouraged publishers to support the work of public libraries has changed to such an extent that this relationship has been stressed to the point of non cooperation.” (via NPR)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2014, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.