Tag Archives: Libraries

Oxford Public Library finding vital new roles

“The kids come in their PJ’s. They curl up with stuffed toys and munch on popcorn. And, while their parents are watching a grown-ups’ movie at the Granada Theater next door, youngsters at the Oxford, Nebraska, Public Library are enjoying a G-rated kid-friendly movie on their own big screen, helping the library fulfill its mission to be a vital, vibrant educational, entertainment and social hub of the community. “We’ve done movie night all winter. It has become very popular,” says library director Danielle Burns, who has, with her teen board, board of directors and “Friends of the Library,” created other new programs and activities that are keeping the public library in residents’ minds and hearts.” (via McCook Daily Gazette)

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How US libraries are becoming community problem solvers

“As a librarian, it’ll probably be no surprise that I like to do my homework. I’ve followed conversations about the future of UK public libraries with a mixture of interest and dismay. Developing public libraries as community hubs and problem-solving partners is a top priority at the American Library Association (ALA), so the incredible work of my UK colleagues and the Arts Council is of great interest to us. Recent South by Southwest and ALA conferences show that US public libraries are evolving in this role as well.” (via Guardian Professional)

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Library officials say ‘nothing has changed,’ embrace shift to digital

“It wasn’t that long ago that prognosticators called libraries a dying breed. You only went there to check out books or to research a school assignment, they said. Computers and e-books would render those things unnecessary. It turns out the forecasters were wrong. Personal computers did become a reality; so did electronic books. But the truth is, these days libraries actually are seeing usage and number of visits go up.” (via Omaha.com)

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Why libraries deserve to be hip

“This afternoon, I’m picking up my younger daughter from school and I’m taking her someplace special. It’s a place she and I can look at works by local artists, where we can read quietly together, where we almost always run into friends. It’s one of best places in the world. You’ve probably got something like it where you live too. It’s called the library. Libraries are not terribly fashionable. You’d think they would be. In a world in which educated, enlightened, planet-hugging types are all up in that composting and upcycling and no impact lifestyle, these wonderful places where you can just borrow stuff and then bring it back so someone else can enjoy it somehow languish. Last year was the first year in several that New York City libraries didn’t face any budget cuts – though branches shut after Hurricane Sandy remain unrestored. Libraries in Detroit have been shuttered in the city’s economic crisis. In the U.K., libraries face closures as the number of people using them plummets.” (via Salon.com)

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Biblioracle: Libraries a haven on earth

“Water is wet.” There’s as much news in that statement as there is in a recent Pew Internet survey that revealed that people value their public libraries. How much do we love our libraries? When asked what impact closing the public library would have on their community, 90 percent said it would have at least a “minor” impact. Sixty-three percent believed it would have a “major impact.” (via chicagotribune.com)

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Libraries want better Internet as they eye new tech

“Libraries say they need better Internet services as they provide new technologies to patrons, pointing to a recent announcement from the Obama administration to increase broadband funding for educational institutions. Earlier this week, President Obama and Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler announced changes to the agency’s E-Rate program, which provides discounts to connect American education institutions to high-speed Internet. On Tuesday, Obama said that tech and telecom companies — including Apple, Microsoft, Verizon, AT&T and Sprint — are giving $750 million to the program in services and equipment” (via TheHill)

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Big crowds at new Billings library produce new phenomena – empty shelves

“Don’t go searching for Clifford the Big Red Dog at the Billings Public Library. The popular children’s books by Norman Bridwell are all checked out. All 50 copies of them. All of the Berenstain Bear books are gone too, along with every one of Jeff Kinney’s “Diary of a Wimpy Kid.” What’s going on over there at the new library? “It’s amazing,” said children’s librarian Cindy Patterson. “I don’t even know what else to say. We have complete authors that are just gone. We’ve never really had that happen before.” (via missoulian.com)

See also Billings Public Library dedicated weeks after ‘soft’ open.

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BOSNIA OPENS LIBRARY TO HOUSE ANCIENT MANUSCRIPTS

“During Bosnia’s war and the siege of Sarajevo, residents moved a collection of ancient books and manuscripts to eight different locations to save them from destruction. On Wednesday, thanks to a $9 million donation from Qatar, Bosnia’s president and a Qatar minister opened a new library in the heart of the Ottoman-era Old Town section of Sarajevo to house those books and more than 100,000 manuscripts. The oldest is a handwritten Islamic encyclopedia that was written in Arabic in 1105.” (via The Associated Press)

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D.C. schools get thousands of new library books, musical instruments, computers

“D.C. Public Schools announced Thursday that it has purchased 85,000 new books for school libraries around the city, an investment that comes after years of pressure from parents and activists. Schools also have received 4,000 new musical instruments, 2,000 desktop computers and more than 1,300 laptops and tablets, as well as art supplies and science lab equipment.” (via The Washington Post)

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An Oyster, Filled With Books, to Open on Staten Island – NYTimes.com

“No one has to tell Mohammed Iddrisu that a public library branch is long overdue in his neighborhood, Mariners Harbor, on the north shore of Staten Island. Mr. Iddrisu, 61, raised three school-age children on South Avenue. When they went to the library — and Mr. Iddrisu said he made sure they did so regularly — they had to travel two and a half miles to the Port Richmond branch. Including the wait for a bus, the trip could take an hour or so.” (via NYTimes.com)

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