Tag Archives: Libraries

Readers who Borrow e-Books from the Library Don’t Buy More Books

“Sometimes we get spoiled in North America with the sheer of amount of options available to borrow eBooks from the library. Statistically over 90% of all libraries in North America have a digital collection and patrons can access all of the content remotely. Things are different in the United Kingdom where only a few major libraries have bothered with a modern eBook collection. In May 2013 the UK government funded a review looking into the viability of allowing customers to borrow eBook, without all of the drama. The Sieghart Review said publishers should not limit the supply of e-books in the same way that physical book loans are controlled, including the lending of each digital copy to one reader at a time, securely removing eBooks after lending and having digital books “deteriorate after a number of loans”. (via Good eReader)

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F.C.C. Chief Aims to Bolster Internet for Schools

“With a goal of fiber-optic lines reaching to every school and a Wi-Fi connection in every classroom, Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, is expected on Monday to propose a 62 percent increase in the amount of money the agency spends annually to wire schools and libraries with high-speed Internet connection” (via NYTimes.com)

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Sensing subversion, China throws the book at kids’ libraries

“When she got off school last Thursday, Huang Qiufeng, the high spirited 12-year old daughter of migrant workers, dropped by the local library in this scruffy village on the outskirts of Beijing, as she does from time to time. She found it closed, replaced by a convenience store. The brightly painted letters on the wall spelling out “BOOK” were obscured by shelves full of instant noodles. “The people here were very nice and I really liked the library,” Qiufeng said. “But now it’s gone.” (via CSMonitor.com)

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Windsor library changes weapons policy

“The Clearview Library District officially changed its rules Thursday, Sept. 25, to allow patrons to legally carry concealed guns in the library.The library board voted unanimously Thursday evening to update the district’s conduct policy to prohibit “open carrying of firearms and weapons; carrying a concealed firearm with a firearm without a concealed firearm permit.”The “Conduct in the Library” policy had stated that all weapons were banned from the library unless carried by law enforcement.” (via Coloradoan)

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Taking A Long-Overdue Sledgehammer To The Public Library

“The day after the Oakland Public Library reopens after a long weekend, branch manager Nick Raymond doesn’t have time to talk. “I could give you maybe five seconds,” he says good-naturedly before returning to the flocking patrons.It’s a scene more typical of a blockbuster opening at a movie theater than Wednesday afternoon at a library. But Raymond manages a different kind of collection: Oakland is among a growing number of libraries across the U.S. that lend tools–as in awls, sledgehammers, and hacksaws–as well as other unexpected items like bakeware, Moog synthesizers, and human skeletons to keep pace with the times.” (via Fast Company)

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Floating library breathes new life into historic steamship

“How much new life can be breathed into an 81-year-old steamship? According to Beatrice Glow, plenty. Over the next four weeks, the Lilac Museum Steamship, berthed at Pier 25 on the Hudson River in lower Manhattan, is home to the “Floating Library” — a space for people to gather, read, discuss and create. The only rule on deck is to power off and stow your cell phone.” (via Metro.us)

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Why Your Library May Soon Have Laser Cutters and 3-D Printers

“Visit the downtown branch of the Chattanooga Public Library and you’ll find the usual stuff: rows of books, magazines, and computers. But walk up to the fourth floor and there’s something unexpected. It’s a “makerspace”—complete with a laser cutter, a zine lab for making paper publications, and a 3-D printer. There’s even a loom.” (via WIRED)

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What the ‘death of the library’ means for the future of books

“Forbes contributor Tim Worstall wants us to close public libraries and buy everyone an Amazon Kindle with an unlimited subscription. “Why wouldn’t we simply junk the physical libraries and purchase an Amazon Kindle Unlimited subscription for the entire country?” he asks. Worstall points to substantial savings on public funds, arguing that people would have access to a much larger collection of books through a Kindle Unlimited subscription than they could get through any public library and that the government would spend far less on a bulk subscription for all residents than it ever would on funding libraries. Is he right? Are libraries obsolete? He might be correct — but only if libraries were just about books, which they are not. Libraries are actually an invaluable public and social resource that provide so much more than simple shelves of books (or, for those in rural areas, a Bookmobile like the one this author grew up with). A world without public libraries is a grim one indeed, and the assault on public libraries should be viewed as alarming.” (via The Week)

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Halifax looks forward to the opening of its very own library of the future

“It is being billed as the “city’s living room.” Its rooftop patio offers stunning views of Halifax harbour. There is a 300-seat theatre, two cafes, gaming stations, two music studios, dedicated space for adult literacy, a First Nations reading circle and boardrooms for local entrepreneurs.Halifax’s new $57.6-million gleaming glass library of the future is to open later this fall – a 129,000-square-foot building in the city’s downtown with a unique cantilevered rectangular glass box on the top, suggesting a stack of books. Fully accessible, culturally sensitive, environmentally sustainable and architecturally stunning, with elegant angles and lines, it is the first piece of modern architecture to be built in Halifax in decades, and the first major central library to be built in Canada in several years.” (via The Globe and Mail)

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Libraries’ choice: Change or fade into oblivion

“When librarians at the Skokie Public Library near Chicago moved their reference collection online and got rid of the massive print volumes, they suddenly had a lot of newly freed-up space. Carolyn Anthony, the library’s director, also serves on the Skokie Chamber of Commerce. She saw that after the economic downturn, many workers who’d lost their corporate jobs were starting businesses out of their homes. In fact, the fastest-growing segment of the chamber was now start-ups with fewer than five employees — many of them with just a single person running the entire operation, often out of a spare bedroom or home office. Working from home is fine, she thought, but meeting clients in a coffee shop gets old fast.” (via USA Today)

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