Tag Archives: Legal research

Harvard Law Library Readies Trove of Decisions for Digital Age

“Shelves of law books are an august symbol of legal practice, and no place, save the Library of Congress, can match the collection at Harvard’s Law School Library. Its trove includes nearly every state, federal, territorial and tribal judicial decision since colonial times — a priceless potential resource for everyone from legal scholars to defense lawyers trying to challenge a criminal conviction. Now, in a digital-age sacrifice intended to serve grand intentions, the Harvard librarians are slicing off the spines of all but the rarest volumes and feeding some 40 million pages through a high-speed scanner. They are taking this once unthinkable step to create a complete, searchable database of American case law that will be offered free on the Internet, allowing instant retrieval of vital records that usually must be paid for.” (via NYT)

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The Benefits Of Self-Publishing Electronic Casebooks

“Recently, the Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts published an online symposium called “Disruptive Publishing Models.” The articles discuss different initiatives to disrupt the traditional model for publishing legal casebooks and how those initiatives are driving down students’ costs for law school teaching materials. My colleague Rebecca Tushnet (Georgetown Law) and I contributed an article to the symposium entitled “Self-Publishing an Electronic Casebook Benefited Our Readers—And Us.” The article analyzes our experiences self-publishing our co-authored legal casebook, Advertising and Marketing Law: Cases and Materials, and it explains numerous reasons why self-publishing the book made more sense for us than pursuing the traditional publication process.” (via Technology Marketing & Law Blog)

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Now over 1,000,000 Items to Search on Congress.gov: Communications and More Added

“This has been a great year as we continue our push to develop and refine Congress.gov. There were email alerts added in February, treaties and better default text in March, the Federalist Papers and more browse options in May, and accessibility and user requested features in July. With this October update, Senate Executive Communications from THOMAS have migrated to Congress.gov. There is an About Executive Communications page that provides more detail about the scope of coverage, searching, viewing, and obtaining copies.” (via In Custodia Legis)

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Decisions in Judicial Misconduct Cases to be Posted Online

“U.S. courts will publish the outcome of misconduct complaints against judges on their websites, in an effort to “provide for greater transparency,” the federal judiciary’s policy-making arm said Thursday. The country is divided into 12 judicial circuits, each containing a circuit court of appeals and at least one federal trial court. About half of the circuit courts currently publish orders resolving misconduct complaints online; the others make them available to the public only in the office of their circuit clerk, a spokesman for the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts said.” (via WSJ)

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Coming Soon to HeinOnline: Religion & the Law

“We are pleased to introduce a a new library coming soon to HeinOnline: Religion & the Law. Consisting of more than 1,200 titles and 600,000 pages, this library provides books, periodicals, and bibliographies that relate to religion and the law. Explore the development, history, organization, and fundamental principles of world religion. This collection also includes an assortment of canon law, early constitutions of the church, and rare historical bibles. As we continue to add new material this collection will grow significantly in the coming years.” (via HeinOnline)

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DocketFish simplifies docket research process for law firms

“With the changing needs of the legal industry come new, innovative technologies that aim at making processes more efficient for workers in all aspects of legal. Research can be one of the more time-consuming, laborious processes for counsel, but certain software has been developed to take a stab at streamlining docket research with a new platform. DocketFish has been developed for lawyers, law librarians, paralegals and others, and includes a platform for conducting research quickly and efficiently. The platform employs caching technology to make docket and document retrieval a simple process, and to help law firms avoid costly duplicate download fees.” (via Inside Counsel)

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Four Law Libraries That Fit in Your Pocket

“On-the-go legal research is an important aspect of any law professional’s career. A firm might subscribe to any number of research services, each with different features. The following comparison of popular services’ mobile apps shows how to make the most of each one, whether you’re using a smartphone, a tablet, or even a PC or Mac.” (via ITI)

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Lexis Advance Named Best Online Legal Research Provider by Readers in The Legal Intelligencer

“LexisNexis® Legal & Professional, a leading provider of content and technology solutions, announced today that Lexis Advance®, the company’s dynamic, next-generation legal information service, has been voted the best online legal research provider in The Legal Intelligencer’s “Best of 2014” survey of Pennsylvania legal professionals. This recognition is one of six “Gold” category wins for LexisNexis solutions for the second year in a row.” (via Lexis Nexis)

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A New Way to Look at Law, With Data Viz and Machine Learning

“On TV, being a lawyer is all about dazzling jurors with verbal pyrotechnics. But for many lawyers–especially young ones–the job is about research. Long, dry, tedious research. It’s that less glamorous side of the profession that Daniel Lewis and Nik Reed are trying to upend with Ravel. Using data visualization, language analysis, and machine learning, the Stanford Law grads are aiming to reinvent legal research–and perhaps give young lawyers a deeper understanding of their field in the process.” (via Wired)

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American Lawyer publisher sold back to Wasserstein & Co

“American Lawyer publisher ALM Media, which was once controlled by Bruce Wasserstein, has been sold to the late Wall Street dealmaker’s investment firm Wasserstein & Co, the companies said in a statement. Financial details of the deal were not publicly disclosed. The New York Times reported the acquisition price was around $417 million, citing a source briefed on the matter.” (via Reuters)

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