Tag Archives: FCC

FCC to boost fund for broadband in schools

“The Federal Communications Commission plans to double a fund dedicated to bringing broadband Internet connections to schools and libraries, bolstering a White House push to wire all U.S. schools with faster speeds. The plan to be announced Wednesday by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is to increase to $2 billion from $1 billion the portion of the E-Rate program for broadband grants. The FCC said the two-year increase in broadband grants will not come from an increase in rates charged to wireless and phone customers. Consumers’ monthly bills include a line-item charge for the federal Universal Service Fund, which includes the $2.4 billion annual E-Rate program.” (via The Washington Post)

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ARL Urges FCC to Support E-Reader Accessibility

“On September 13, ARL submitted reply comments to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) opposing a petition filed by the Coalition of E-Reader Manufacturers. The manufacturers are requesting a waiver from the FCC that would exempt e-readers from the requirement that equipment used for advanced communication services (ACS) be accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities.” (via ARL)

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F.C.C. Backs Plan to Update a Fund That Helps Connect Schools to the Internet

“The Federal Communications Commission voted on Friday to overhaul and possibly expand its E-Rate program, a $2.3 billion effort to provide schools and libraries with up-to-date telecommunications service and equipment, including high-speed Internet connections. A proposal approved by the commission, which will be made available for public comment before a final version is completed, calls for funds to be moved away from outdated uses like paying for paging service and long-distance phone calls and into areas that will accelerate digital literacy, like Wi-Fi connections within a school or library.” (via NYTimes.com)

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FCC to Explore Helping Low-Income Americans Afford Internet Access

Mashable – “FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski announced Monday that he will be ordering sweeping changes to the Lifeline low-income telecommunications connectivity program. The Lifeline program was formed to help low-income Americans pay for telephone connectivity. Lifeline subscribers have been able to receive as much as $10 off their monthly telephone bills for either a landline or mobile phone. But high-speed Internet has been replacing the telephone as the main connectivity choice for Americans, and the FCC recognizes that shift.”

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The Download: FCC opens ‘technology experience center’ for staff, industry to interact

Washington Post – “A herd of interns huddled around a display table of tech gadgets at the Federal Communications Commission last week, picking up and passing around Hasbro 3-D goggles, an Amazon Kindle and a Polaroid photo printer designed by Lady Gaga. The agency converted a corner of its library into a “technology experience center” where employees can interact with the latest gizmos from companies that are directly impacted by the FCC’s policies.”

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What You Need To Know About the National Broadband Plan

GigaOm – “The FCC will deliver its National Broadband Plan to Congress a day earlier than originally scheduled — on March 16. Also on that day, the five FCC commissioners will vote on a “mission statement” intended to represent the spirit of the submitted documents. The plan, which Congress called for as part of the stimulus package passed last year, will recommend ways to provide universal broadband access as well as encourage Congress and industry to use broadband in health care, education and energy efficiency programs.”

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Reuters – ” The U.S. Federal Communications Commission will seek to bring Internet speeds of 1 gigabit per second by 2020 to community institutions such as schools and government buildings, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said on Thursday.”

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2 Steps Forward, 2 Steps Back

Joe Garofoli – “Fifty years ago today, a San Francisco Municipal Court judge ruled that Allen Ginsberg’s Beat-era poem “Howl” was not obscene. Yet today, a New York public broadcasting station decided not to air the poem, fearing that the Federal Communications Commission will find it indecent and crush the network with crippling fines. (via)

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