Tag Archives: Digital

Scranton woman helps library adapt to changing world

“Elizabeth Davis walks in undiscovered country these days.The Scranton resident is the first to hold the recently created job of digital services librarian at Scranton Public Library, giving her a chance – and the responsibility – to figure out what the job can and should be. “It’s a little terrifying, actually,” she said with a laugh. Miss Davis started the new position in June, moving from Lackawanna County Children’s Library, where she worked for several years and had been children’s outreach coordinator.” (via The Times-Tribune)

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The Morgan Library & Museum to begin digitization of its renowned drawings collection

“The Morgan Library & Museum announced today that it will begin the digitization of its collection of master drawings, considered to be one of the greatest in the world. The initiative will result in a digital library of more than 10,000 images, representing drawings spanning the fourteenth to twenty-first centuries, available free of charge on the Morgan’s website. The project will begin in October and is expected to be completed within one year, contributing significantly to the Morgan’s commitment to advancing drawings scholarship. The images will be accessible in two formats: one for general identification and another for detailed study with enhanced resolution. Scholarly information about each drawing will be linked to a corresponding Morgan catalogue record. Importantly, the project includes approximately 2,000 images of versos (reverse sides) of drawings that contain rarely seen sketches or inscriptions by the artist. The digital library will be available on an open-access basis, and can be downloaded for non-commercial uses such as classroom presentations, dissertations, and educational websites devoted to the fine arts.” (via Art Daily)

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As academic libraries cull their printed collections, they find bigger audience outside their walls

“Shelves and shelves of books sit mostly ignored, taking up space. Thousands of tomes now seem like relics instead of resources. They contribute more to the decor and ambiance of a college library than the use of it – afterthoughts for the Millennials who hunker down to study there. Rooted quite literally by name in books, academic libraries are now backing out of the hard-copy business. But unlike many traditional institutions facing revolutionary shake-ups, experts say libraries are relishing the information age and digital transformation. Instead of existing to house static collections of scholarly journals waiting to be pulled for review, academic libraries are finding more opportunities to push information out beyond their walls.” (via Indianapolis Star)

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The 2014 National Agenda for Digital Stewardship is now available!

“The National Agenda for Digital Stewardship annually integrates the perspective of dozens of experts and hundreds of institutions, convened through the Library of Congress, to provide funders and executive decision?makers insight into emerging technological trends, gaps in digital stewardship capacity, and key areas for funding, research and development to ensure that today’s valuable digital content remains accessible and comprehensible in the future, supporting a thriving economy, a robust democracy, and a rich cultural heritage” (via LOC)

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Library Services in the Digital Age

“The internet has already had a major impact on how people find and access information, and now the rising popularity of e-books is helping transform Americans’ reading habits. In this changing landscape, public libraries are trying to adjust their services to these new realities while still serving the needs of patrons who rely on more traditional resources. In a new survey of Americans’ attitudes and expectations for public libraries, the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project finds that many library patrons are eager to see libraries’ digital services expand, yet also feel that print books remain important in the digital age.”

via Pew

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Libraries face a digital future

The Guardian – “It’s a time of radical change for libraries. During the summer they were told by the Museums, Libraries & Archives Council and the Local Government Group to exploit digital technologies to survive the spending cuts. In a report on the government’s Future Libraries Programme the two bodies also argued that the latest IT developments present a huge opportunity for libraries to deliver more efficient and effective services. Allen Weiner, Gartner’s research vice president in the US, took a similar line when he shared his thoughts about the role of technology in libraries at the Re-Thinking Libraries event in London this November.”

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Digitizing an Analog Past

WSJ – “From around the mid 1970s into the 1990s analog recording became popular and affordable. Photocopiers, audio and video cassette recorders may seem slow and cumbersome now, but then they put capabilities into the hands of individuals which had previously only been available to fairly large organizations.In the days of punk, photocopied “fanzines” spread the word. For other forms of music, home-made mix cassette tapes were often the chosen medium. At the time, their ephemeral nature was perhaps part of the attraction, but now people are beginning to look for ways to preserve examples of a past that often represents their youth.”

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Historical Society Joins Digital Age

WSJ – “When the New-York Historical Society reopens to the public on Nov. 11, it will shun conventional museum policy and invite visitors to touch the objects in its new gallery. Some of them, anyway. A new series of interactive kiosks will invite people to experience the collections through touches, taps and swipes. The technology is part of a three-year, $65 million renovation project that aims to shake the dust off both the building and the organization, which houses the oldest museum in New York City.”

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Toronto online book archive forced to fire 75% of staff

Toronto Star – “If they had a million dollars, they’d buy more time. But a vast online library doesn’t have that kind of cash, so it is drastically reducing its devoted workforce. Internet Archive Canada, a small non-profit company, fired 35 of its 47 employees on Wednesday due to a massive drop in donations. Most will leave Aug. 12 unless a white knight appears soon.”

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