Tag Archives: Digital Libraries

Columbus Metropolitan Library gets $188K grant for equipment for statewide ‘Digitization Hub’ network

“The Columbus Metropolitan Library has landed $188,219 in federal and state grants to buy equipment for a statewide effort creating a network of “Digitization Hubs” to preserve historical materials. The money is coming from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal agency that distributes funding to libraries nationwide. It’s sending $760,421 to Ohio to upgrade digitization equipment and software at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, the Cleveland Public Library and Columbus Metropolitan Library, according to a press release. The libraries are creating regional digitization centers serving other libraries, museums, archives and local communities.” (via American City Business Journals)

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NLM Releases Digitized Collection of Its Publications and Productions

“The National Library of Medicine NLM is pleased to announce a new addition to its Digital Collections: over 400 NLM publications and productions dating from the 1860s to the 1990s.This new digital collection encompasses all printed monographic publications produced by the National Library of Medicine and its earlier incarnation as the Library of the Surgeon Generals Office. The collection also includes nearly three dozen audiovisual productions produced by the NLM during the past six decades, as well as publications of the NLMs institutional and historical “sister,” the Army Medical Museum, which is today the National Museum of Health and Medicine. In the early 1920s, the Library of the Surgeon Generals Office was renamed the Army Medical Library, and it was housed with the Army Medical Museum until the 1950s when the institutions were physically separated as they are today.  They continue to share a common goal of collecting, preserving, and providing knowledge about the past, present, and future of biomedicine and health care.” (via NLM)

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FDR archive hits the Web

“A public database of 350,000 pages of archival documents and 2,000 historical photographs relating to the 32nd president, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and his wife, Eleanor Roosevelt, can be accessed from any computer in a virtual research room dubbed “FRANKLIN,” which went live at 10 a.m. Wednesday, a spokesman for the library said. The database is a collaborative effort by the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum, the National Archives and Records Administration, Marist College, IBM and the Roosevelt Institute, library spokesman Cliff Laube said.” (via The Poughkeepsie Journal)

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German Digital Library releases API

“Last month the German Digital Library Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek – DDB made a promising step forward toward further opening up their data by releasing its API Application Programming Interface to the public. This API provides access to all the metadata of the DDB released under a CC0 license, which is the predominant share. The release of this API opens up a wide range of possibilities for users to build applications, create combinations with other data or include the German digitised cultural heritage on other platforms. In the future, the DDB also plans to organize a programming competition for API applications as well as a series of workshops for developers.” (via OpenGLAM)

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UNC’s Digital Heritage Center knits state’s history together

“In the information age, libraries can seem like antiquated relics; quaint places where three-dimensional books gather dust. But librarians across the state are working hard to digitize their collections, and now treasures that have long sat in archive rooms are available for public viewing. “We have 125,000 items currently digitized,” said Nicholas Graham, the program director at the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center, the statewide digital library that enables cultural heritage institutions across the state to share their collections online. “When we’re done there will be over half a million documents.” (via NewsObserver.com)

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NLM Releases Enhancements to Its “Digital Collections” Repository

“The National Library of Medicine, the world’s largest medical library and a component of the National Institutes of Health, released several enhancements to Digital Collections, the free online archive of biomedical resources, at the end of September.” (via NLM)

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Ransom Center Launches Online Digital Image Collection

“The Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, has launched a new platform of freely available digitized images of collection materials on its website. The new site, http://hrc.contentdm.oclc.org, contains more than 8,000 items and will continue to grow as newly digitized images are added on a regular basis.” (via Ransom Center)

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Bringing Frankenstein to Life

“As night falls this Halloween, a new creation will come to life — an electrifying new digital archive that sheds light on the genesis of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.The Shelley-Godwin Archive will make available online a collection of digitized manuscripts of Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, offering scholars, students, and the public an opportunity to probe the connections and collaborations within England’s “first family of writers.”  Created by scholars, curators, and information scientists from the New York Public Library, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), and the Bodleian Libraries of the University of Oxford, this new scholarly resource was made possible by a $300,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).” (via National Endowment for the Humanities)

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London’s health records open up with the launch of London’s Pulse

“From smallpox to sun lamps, the health of London and Londoners over 125 years is uncovered with London’s Pulse, an ambitious digitisation project from the Wellcome Library which launches today supported by Jisc. The online resource contains over 5000 fully searchable reports, from 1848 to 1973, detailing the health of Londoners in intimate detail – borough by borough and often street by street – written by the people responsible for keeping the city healthy over a period of drastic social, economic and technological change.” (via Jisc)

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ACS Publications announces the large-scale digitization and open availability of data coupled to ACS Legacy Archives Journals

“The Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) announced today the completion of a comprehensive undertaking to digitally convert and conserve the Supporting Information for its broadly subscribed ACS Legacy Archives journals collection. This initiative was part of the Society’s commitment to broaden the online accessibility of the Supporting Information and data associated with the ACS Legacy Archives –– a premium collection of nearly half a million original research articles published in ACS journals between the years 1879 and 1995. The digitization effort has generated new Supporting Information files for 40,000 ACS original research articles, and in total comprises 800,000 pages of highly valuable data and underlying research information.” (via ACS/a>)

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