Tag Archives: Digital Libraries

Newly launched Posen Digital Library makes available Jewish literature, art, artifacts and more

“Yale University Press has launched the Posen Digital Library, which makes available online the artworks, literary works, and artifacts from The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization. Created by Yale University Press and the Posen Foundation, the 10-volume Posen Library collects the best of Jewish culture from throughout the ages, from biblical times to the present. The first volume, covering the period from 1973 to 2005, was published in print in November, 2012. James E. Young, professor of English and Judaic studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is the Posen Library’s editor-in-chief.” (via YaleNews)

Leave a Comment

Detroit Public Library unveils remarkable digital collections

“Everything about a trip to the Main Branch of the Detroit Public Library (DPL) leaves a lasting impression — from the grand staircase of the building’s east wing to the murals and stained glass in Adam Strom Hall to the amazing collection of books and periodicals. Every Detroiter needs to visit this remarkable institution, which currently is celebrating its sesquicentennial. Now, however, many of the wonders of the DPL are available to you from the comforts of your own home. In October, a years-long digitization project culminated in the launch of the Digital Collections at the Detroit Public Library. Some of the library’s rarest, most intriguing documents and photos now can be accessed through the web. According to a recent newsletter from the library, “These online collections feature more than 67,000 images that have been digitized and cataloged for public use.” (via Model D Media.

Comments Off

Science fiction fanzines to be digitized as part of major UI initiative

“The University of Iowa Libraries has announced a major digitization initiative, in partnership with the UI Office of the Vice President for Research and Economic Development. 10,000 science fiction fanzines will be digitized from the James L. “Rusty” Hevelin Collection, representing the entire history of science fiction as a popular genre and providing the content for a database that documents the development of science fiction fandom.” (via The University of Iowa)

Comments Off

State Library and Archives digital collection showcases Tennessee folklife

“The Tennessee State Library and Archives is releasing a new digital collection showcasing Tennessee folklife. The collection documents folk culture unique to Tennessee and highlights the state’s significant contributions to national studies of folklife. The project was designed to record interviews with local musicians, craftsmen and storytellers in communities around six state parks, and present annual community folk art festivals within those parks.” (via AP)

Comments Off

EC reports on digitisation in Europe

“In early October the European Commission published two reports on the current state of digitisation of cultural heritage material in Europe: one report addresses progress in the area of digitisation and online accessibility of cultural material and digital preservation, while the other looks more specifically at the situation around European film heritage in the digital era. Both reports conclude that although more cultural content has been made available online in recent years, there is still a lot of work to be done.” (via OpenGLAM)

Comments Off

New York helps sort Queensland’s digital history

“The State Library of Queensland is getting members of the public to help make its digital photos, newspaper articles and diaries more accessible online as part of the Pitch In! program. Volunteers are set tasks such as adding information to photos and transcribing newspaper articles that make up the library’s online digital collection. Margaret Warren is the co-ordinator of discovery services and says people are involved from as far as New York and Ireland.” (via ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation))

Comments Off

Library’s rare treasures getting digital access

“Stepping into the rare books room at the Allen County Public Library is like stepping back in time. Antique furniture complements the character of a room devoted to the library’s ever-expanding collection of rare and antique – even ancient – books and artifacts.” (via The Journal Gazette)

Comments Off

Visually impaired teen makes impact at Southside digital library

“When Christian Sanchez reported to the Bexar County BiblioTech as an intern in June, he immediately made his mark. Within days, the 16-year-old had learned every facet of all-digital library located at 3505 Pleasanton Road. The tech savvy teen’s duties ranged from working the circulation desk to one-on-one sessions with visually impaired patrons. While Sanchez is particularly adept at helping visually impaired patrons — he’s blind himself — he readily assisted all patrons, answering tech questions and providing information.” (via San Antonio Express-News)

Comments Off

Indiana working to digitize historic newspapers

“A staff of two at the Indiana State Library is working to preserve what is left of the printed record of Indiana’s history as the yellowing, crumbling newspapers that chronicled Hoosiers’ lives deteriorate with age. “We really want, for Indiana’s bicentennial, to create a resource for all of Indiana to reflect state history as well as local history,” said Connie Rendfeld, digital initiatives librarian for the Indiana State Library. The project’s goal, as part of Indiana’s bicentennial celebrations in 2016, is to have digitized historic papers from every county in the state.” (via Munster Community News)

Comments Off

A World Digital Library Is Coming True!

“In the scramble to gain market share in cyberspace, something is getting lost: the public interest. Libraries and laboratories—crucial nodes of the World Wide Web—are buckling under economic pressure, and the information they diffuse is being diverted away from the public sphere, where it can do most good. Not that information comes free or “wants to be free,” as Internet enthusiasts proclaimed twenty years ago.1 It comes filtered through expensive technologies and financed by powerful corporations. No one can ignore the economic realities that underlie the new information age, but who would argue that we have reached the right balance between commercialization and democratization?” (via The New York Review of Books)

Comments Off

© Copyright 2015, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.