Tag Archives: Boston

Boston museums teaming up to display rare medieval manuscripts

“Art historian Jeffrey Hamburger slowly turns the animal-skin pages of a fragile religious book, his eyes riveted to bold script that chronicles the lives of the early saints. The craftsmanship is spectacular, the presentation vivid and compelling — even though the work is more than 1,000 years old. The Harvard professor handles the book with awed reverence: It is a priceless illuminated manuscript written by a superbly skilled scribe, probably at a Benedictine abbey in central France no later than the year 935. Today, it resides in the well-protected recesses of the Boston Public Library.” (via The Boston Globe)

Leave a Comment

Librarians Converge On Boston To Bring Libraries Into The Future

“Thousand of library professionals from around the country swelled the population of Boston in recent days as the American Library Association (ALA) held their 2016 Midwinter Meeting here. For four days, they gathered at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center to attend workshops, listen to speakers, chat with publishers and talk shop. So, what happens when so many librarians gather in one spot? I’m not quite sure what I was expecting from this annual conference, but I am sure it was not what I was seeing as I rode the escalator down to the enormous, gleaming exhibition hall on the Boston waterfront.” (via WGBH News)

Comments Off on Librarians Converge On Boston To Bring Libraries Into The Future

Someone is Trying to Save You From Awful Books at the Boston Public Library

“February is Library Lovers’ Month, a time of year when you would expect bookworms to cuddle up in warmly lit bookstack nooks and whisper (literally whisper, this is the library we’re talking about) sweet nothings into the pages of their beloved novels. But those who visit the Boston Public Library’s “BiblioCommons” portal, which hosts user-generated reviews and reading lists by Boston Public Library members, might spot someone who appears to be a “hater” amongst all of the lovers. A user who goes by the name “noluckboston,” has used BiblioCommons to tag 74 books in the Boston Public Library system as “awful library book.” The tag “awful library book” is featured amongst some more typical categories to classify books, such as “suspense,” “romance,” and “fiction,” in the site’s “recent tags” box.” (via Boston.com)

Comments Off on Someone is Trying to Save You From Awful Books at the Boston Public Library

Boston library projects land $700,000 from Knight Foundation to teach public about privacy and city data

“On Friday, The Knight Foundation awarded over $700,000 in grants to two Boston-based organizations that are using libraries to educate the public about digital privacy tools and share information about public data.  One of the winning projects, Open Data to Open Knowledge, was submitted by Boston’s chief information officer Jascha Franklin-Hodge, and seeks to take data gleaned from the city’s Open Data project and make it publicly available to the citizens through the network of public libraries. “By working with our vast network of public and academic research libraries, the City of Boston can help people access this information in a multitude of ways: to support research, to better understand their city, and to connect this new type of data and the traditional resources curated by our libraries,” Franklin-Hodge wrote in his proposal.” (via BetaBoston)

Comments Off on Boston library projects land $700,000 from Knight Foundation to teach public about privacy and city data

Cambridge Public Library declines offer of local author’s book, and then apologizes

“Being a well-known writer and longtime resident of Cambridge, Katherine A. Powers can be excused for expecting to find her latest book on the shelves of the local library. After all, the book about her father, the late writer J.F. Powers, has been widely reviewed, with words of praise appearing in The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, and The Boston Globe. (Powers wrote a column for the Globe for 20 years.) But after a recent visit to the Cambridge Public Library revealed that the book, “Suitable Accommodations: An Autobiographical Story of Family Life: The Letters of J.F. Powers, 1942-1963,” is not, in fact, part of the library’s collection, Powers offered to donate a copy. The library’s answer? Thanks, but no thanks. Citing a policy intended to discourage the public from dumping their unwanted volumes on the library’s doorstep, three employees of the library declined Powers’s offer.” (via Boston.com)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2016, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.