Tag Archives: Bookstores

The Technology Of Books Has Changed, But Bookstores Are Hanging In

“If the book is dead, nobody bothered to tell the folks at Capitol Hill Books in Washington, D.C. Books of every size, shape and genre occupy each square inch of the converted row house — including the bathroom — all arranged in an order discernible only to the mind of Jim Toole, the store’s endearingly grouchy owner. Visitors are greeted by a makeshift sign listing words that are banned in the store, including “awesome,” “perfect” and, most of all, “Amazon.” The online giant has crushed many an independent bookstore — but not Toole’s. “Hanging in here with my fingernails,” he says with a harrumph.” (via NPR)

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Indie Bookstores Turn to Crowdfunding to Stay Alive

“IN 1997 ALAN Beatts founded Borderlands Books in San Francisco, and for almost two decades the indie store, which specializes in fantasy, science fiction, horror, and mystery, has weathered challenges from Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and e-books. But when the city passed a law raising its minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2018, Beatts announced he was closing up shop. The story made headlines, catapulting him into the national spotlight.” (via WIRED)

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On Long Island, Bookstores and Libraries Expand Their Offerings

“When Marty Schwartz and Melinda Nasti take a vacation, they make a point of finding live-music venues. “We’re really attracted to places with folk singers,” Ms. Nasti said on the day after Christmas, while she and Mr. Schwartz, who live in Port Washington, sat at a corner table in the 20-seat cafe at the Dolphin Bookshop there. They were there not to thumb through a stack of best sellers, but to listen as Fred Hintze, a musician from Lake Panamok, on eastern Long Island, strummed his guitar and sang.” (via NYTimes.com)

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Era ends: Liquidation sale at Berkeley’s Serendipity Books

“When Peter Howard, the owner of Serendipity Books, died in March 2011, he left behind more than one million books crammed into his two-level store on University Avenue in Berkeley with the oak barrel hanging out front.Howard’s collection of rare and antique books was considered one of the best in the country; he often sold books and manuscripts to places like the Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley or the Lilly Library at Indiana University.The collection included so many amazing items that Bonham’s held six different auctions of his holdings, selling off early editions of John Steinbeck, a broadside by James Joyce, many modern first editions, early baseball memorabilia — even poet Carl Sandburg’s guitar.But there are still books left to sell. More than 100,000 books, in fact.” (via Berkeleyside)

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Brick-And-Mortar Bookstores Play The Print Card Against Amazon

“When it comes to book publishing, all we ever seem to hear about is online sales, the growth of e-books and the latest version of a digital book reader. But the fact is, only 20 percent of the book market is e-books; it’s still dominated by print. And a recent standoff in the book business shows how good old-fashioned, brick-and-mortar bookstores are still trying to wield their influence in the industry. You might even call it brick-and-mortar booksellers’ revenge.” (via NPR)

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