Tag Archives: Bookstores

Indie Bookstores Turn to Crowdfunding to Stay Alive

“IN 1997 ALAN Beatts founded Borderlands Books in San Francisco, and for almost two decades the indie store, which specializes in fantasy, science fiction, horror, and mystery, has weathered challenges from Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and e-books. But when the city passed a law raising its minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2018, Beatts announced he was closing up shop. The story made headlines, catapulting him into the national spotlight.” (via WIRED)

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On Long Island, Bookstores and Libraries Expand Their Offerings

“When Marty Schwartz and Melinda Nasti take a vacation, they make a point of finding live-music venues. “We’re really attracted to places with folk singers,” Ms. Nasti said on the day after Christmas, while she and Mr. Schwartz, who live in Port Washington, sat at a corner table in the 20-seat cafe at the Dolphin Bookshop there. They were there not to thumb through a stack of best sellers, but to listen as Fred Hintze, a musician from Lake Panamok, on eastern Long Island, strummed his guitar and sang.” (via NYTimes.com)

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Era ends: Liquidation sale at Berkeley’s Serendipity Books

“When Peter Howard, the owner of Serendipity Books, died in March 2011, he left behind more than one million books crammed into his two-level store on University Avenue in Berkeley with the oak barrel hanging out front.Howard’s collection of rare and antique books was considered one of the best in the country; he often sold books and manuscripts to places like the Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley or the Lilly Library at Indiana University.The collection included so many amazing items that Bonham’s held six different auctions of his holdings, selling off early editions of John Steinbeck, a broadside by James Joyce, many modern first editions, early baseball memorabilia — even poet Carl Sandburg’s guitar.But there are still books left to sell. More than 100,000 books, in fact.” (via Berkeleyside)

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Brick-And-Mortar Bookstores Play The Print Card Against Amazon

“When it comes to book publishing, all we ever seem to hear about is online sales, the growth of e-books and the latest version of a digital book reader. But the fact is, only 20 percent of the book market is e-books; it’s still dominated by print. And a recent standoff in the book business shows how good old-fashioned, brick-and-mortar bookstores are still trying to wield their influence in the industry. You might even call it brick-and-mortar booksellers’ revenge.” (via NPR)

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One Way For An Indie Bookstore To Last? Put Women ‘First’

“As recently as 25 years ago, there were more than 100 self-described feminist bookstores in the U.S. — stores focusing on books written by and for women. Like most independent bookstores, though, their numbers have dropped dramatically over the years. Chicago’s Women and Children First is among the few feminist stores still standing, and one of the largest. The store opened 34 years ago in 1979. Now, after a long, successful run, the store’s owners say they’re ready to retire — and they’re looking for a buyer to continue the store’s mission.” (via NPR)

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NEW ENGLISH-LANGUAGE BOOKSTORE A 1ST IN HAVANA

“Anglophones, rejoice: Cuba’s first English-language bookstore, cafe and literary salon opened in Havana on Friday, offering islanders and tourists alike a unique space to converse, thumb through magazines and buy or borrow tomes in the language of Shakespeare. The brainchild of a longtime U.S. expat, Cuba Libro launched with just 300 books on offer, about what you’d expect to find in the lobby of an average U.S. bed & breakfast. Next to what’s available elsewhere in English in Cuba, however, it might as well be the Library of Congress.” (via Associated Press)

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Owner, new CEO of Powell’s Books see strength in brick and mortar

“It’s tough to think about how people will read in 50 years when you’re worrying about what they’ll read tomorrow. So after just a couple of years as chief executive of Powell’s Books, Emily Powell — granddaughter of the bookseller’s founder — told employees last month she would step down and focus on the Portland company’s long-term strategy in a quickly changing market. Powell remains the third-generation owner of Powell’s Books, having effectively taken over running the company from her father, Michael Powell, in 2012.” (via OregonLive.com)

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Colleges try to beat textbook costs with book reserves

“Any university or college student knows how badly textbook prices can sting, but for most, it’s simply the nature of higher education that they’ll have to obtain the text if they want to take the class. Sales of used books and book-rental services like Chegg have tried to address the problem, but the end result still requires a financial commitment on top of tuition. But now, three different institutions are adopting a solution that is far kinder to students’ wallets. Robert Morris University, in Pennsylvania, the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Patrick Henry College, in Virginia, have all started a textbook reserve — essentially a library from which students can borrow required texts. “This was the brainchild of an honors class,” said John Michalenko, vice president for student life at Robert Morris. “The students … were talking to their friends about the rising cost of textbooks on college campuses, which [have] actually risen 800 percent more than tuition increases.” From there, Michalenko explained, the students conducted a survey among classmates before submitting a proposal for the reserve idea. Robert Morris started the service in the fall, and allows students to borrow books for up to three hours at a time.”

via Inside Higher Ed

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Book-Vending Machine Dispenses Suspense

Earlier this year, Stephen Fowler, owner of The Monkey’s Paw used-book store in Toronto, had an idea. He wanted a creative way to offload his more ill-favored books — “old and unusual” all, as the store’s motto goes — that went further than a $1 bin by the register. It came in a conversation with his wife: a vending machine. “Originally, I thought maybe we would just have a refrigerator box and paint it to look like a vending machine,” he tells NPR, “and put a skinny assistant of mine inside and have him drop books out when people put a coin in.”

via NPR

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New SF bookstore devoted to rescuing out-of-print sf books and making them into free ebooks

“Singularity & Co is a new Brooklyn based science fiction bookstore with a mission: based on the Kickstarter project that provided its seed funding, the store is devoted to rescuing one customer-chosen, out-of-print sf book from obscurity by buying the rights to publish it online as a free ebook.”

via Boing Boing

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