Tag Archives: books

Classic authors meet 21st century APIs: Pearson unlocks new world class content in Penguin Classics and dkimages APIs

“Pearson announces the release of two new data sets on the first birthday of its API programme, giving developers access to world class content from DK and Penguin. The dkimages API consists of a library of 90,000 images, while the Penguin Classics API includes 48 well-known titles, providing a wealth of image and literary content to inspire developer creativity.  Available through Plug & Play, Pearson’s API platform, the two data sets present exciting opportunities for developers to create new and innovative apps and services. The Penguin Classic API makes content from 31 authors and works including “David Copperfield”, “Emma” and “Melmoth the Wanderer” available.  Developers can explore the work of authors such as Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde, Anne Brontë, Charlotte Brontë and Thomas Hardy, creating new apps and experiences from these well-known books.”

via Pearson

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25 years of asking, Where’s Waldo?

“Wheres Waldo? He wont be difficult to find once the 25th anniversary kicks off for the bespectacled, and beloved, childrens book character. England will get the global party started Thursday night, when it lights up its popular tourist attraction, the London Eye, in red and white stripes emulating Waldos classic jersey. On Friday, New Yorks Empire State Building will follow suit when it, too, is lighted up in red and white.”

via LA Times

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Rare Nazi book donated to holocaust museum

“When a La Grange Park Public Library employee noticed the German word for secret written inside the front cover of an old book donated to the library, she knew it wasn’t the typical anonymous gift. An envelope tucked inside its pages gave more clues to its significance a document of the Third Reich’s industrial build-up to World War II in Germany. The return address was for Paul Pleiger, who was selected by Nazi party leader Hermann Göring, to oversee the industrial push to produce iron, steel and other material necessities for conducting the war.”

via Chicago Tribune

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Davenport Public Library throws out 4,000 books; other libraries do same

“When employees at Davinci’s Café in downtown Davenport step out the back door for a break, they have a clear view of two garbage bins behind the Davenport Public Library. The alleyway vista is unremarkable unless you happen to notice the content of the bins:  hundreds of library books. “They’ve been throwing books in the Dumpsters for at least the past two months,” says Davinci’s bartender Brittnee Kaecker, who recently salvaged two of the books for herself.  Both bear multiple marks identifying them as property of the Davenport Public Library and are in such good condition one would assume they had just been checked out rather than pulled them from the trash.”

via KWQC

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Larry McMurtry’s Book Auction in Texas

“Larry McMurtry, the famed author of “Lonesome Dove” and dozens of other books, was walking slowly along State Highway 79 on Friday morning toward this town’s only intersection. Down the block, more than 150 collectors and dealers were queuing up to bid on 300,000 used books — about two-thirds of the stock of Booked Up, the four-building literary mecca that Mr. McMurtry started here in 1988.”

via NYTimes

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Reading Jacques Bonnet’s “Phantoms on the Bookshelves”

“As Anthony Burgess once commented, there is no better reason for not reading a book than having it, but an exception should be made for Jacques Bonnet’s “Phantoms on the Bookshelves,” just out this month. It appears at a time when books and literature as we have known them are undergoing a great and perhaps catastrophic change. A tide is coming in and the kingdom of books, with their white pages and endpapers, their promise of solitude and discovery, is in danger, after an existence of five hundred years, of being washed away. The physical possession of a book may become of little significance. Access to it will be what matters, and when the book is closed, so to speak, it will disappear into the cyber. It will be like the genie—summonable but unreal. Bonnet’s private library, however, comprised of more than forty thousand volumes, is utterly real. Assembled according to his own interests, idiosyncratic, it came into being more or less incidentally over some four decades through a love of reading and a disinclination to part with a book after it was acquired. Among other things, he might need it some day.”

via The New Yorker

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Should young adult books have age ratings?

“It’s a debate we expect to hear a lot more of in coming years: is developing a ratings system for increasingly dark young adult literature a move toward responsibility and oversight – or a slide into censorship? In its latest iteration, the debate is being played out across the pond in the UK, where bestselling children’s authors G.P. Taylor and Patrick Ness sparred on BBC Breakfast over Taylor’s proposal to establish an age-ranging system for children’s lit.”

via The Christian Science Monitor

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English books rejected, stir debate at Fremont school board meeting

“A Fremont teacher’s request for a controversial story to be included in the list of acceptable texts for Advanced Placement English was rejected by Fremont Unified School District’s Board of Education in a 5-3 vote June 27. Teri Hu, a Washington High School AP English teacher, requested the use of “Bastard Out of Carolina” in 2009 and was rejected although books with similar subject matter such as “The Color Purple,” “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” and “We Were the Mulvaneys” were approved, according to Acacia O’Connor, a National Coalition Against Censorship project coordinator.”

via San Jose Mercury News

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NY library worker sentenced for stolen book fines

“A New York library worker who admitted stealing more than $160,000 in overdue book fines and other revenue has been sentenced to six months in jail. The Westchester district attorney’s office says Yonkers resident Margo Reed will have to pay back the full amount and spend 4 1/2 years on probation.

via Associated Press

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30-ton book collection in Canada slated for burning

“How to dispense with 30 tons of books? Burn them, the custodian of a massive Canadian collection has decided.

It’s the second time the book collection in Saskatoon has been slated for a fiery end. Seven years ago, when her neighbor died, Shauna Raycraft intervened and saved the books from destruction. The neighbor’s widow, faced with the prospect of getting rid of her husband’s 300,000 books, had wanted to simply burn them. Raycraft had the books trucked to her property. Over the better part of a decade, she has managed to sort only a third of them; about 200,000 remain.

via LA Times.

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