Tag Archives: books

Caveat Lecter

“Good news for fans of anthropodermic bibliopegy, bibliomaniacs and cannibals alike: tests have revealed that Houghton Library’s copy of Arsène Houssaye’s Des destinées de l’ame (FC8.H8177.879dc) is without a doubt bound in human skin. Harvard conservators and scientists tested the binding using several different methods. According to Senior Rare Book Conservator Alan Puglia, they are 99% confident that the binding is of human origin. Microscopic samples were taken from various locations on the binding, and were analyzed by peptide mass fingerprinting, which identifies proteins to create a “peptide mass fingerprint” (PMF) allowing analysts to identify the source.” (via Houghton Library Blog)

Leave a Comment

Indigo Love of Reading Foundation Marks 10 Year Anniversary

“During the past 10 years, more than 1.5 million books have made their way into the hands of children through the Indigo Love of Reading Foundation. If the amount of books supplied were stacked on top of each other they would equal the height of 20 CN Towers, or laid end-to-end, they would span the length of PEI. The Indigo Love of Reading Foundation will mark its 10th anniversary by announcing the 20 new recipients of the 2014 Indigo Love of Reading Literacy Fund grant. The Foundation will once again donate $1.5 million to 20 high-needs elementary schools in an effort to bolster literacy and transform school libraries across the country. To date the Foundation has committed more than $17 million to 1,600 elementary schools in Canada through its Literacy Fund grant and community Adopt a School program. The Foundation continues to ensure that all children have equal access to books and encourages a lifelong love of reading.” (via CNW)

Leave a Comment

Books-A-Million Is Helping Give Away Half A Million Free Books

“On April 23, 2014, 25,000 volunteers from Kodiak to Key West will give away half a million free books in more than 6,000 towns and cities across America. World Book Night U.S. (WBN) is an ambitious campaign to give thousands of free, specially-printed paperbacks to light or non-readers. Volunteer book lovers from 258 Books-A-Million stores across the country will help promote reading by venturing out into their communities and giving away free copies of a book they love, often to those without means or access to a printed book. With the organizational support of Books-A-Million, along with other community partners and libraries, volunteers will be sharing books with non-readers in locations such as hospitals, mass transit, nursing homes, food pantries, underfunded schools and more.” (via WSJ.com)

Comments Off

Library cuts are forcing tough decisions on children’s books in Miami-Dade

“Third graders love reading about Lulu and her habit of adopting strays, be it a duck in a park or a cat in a bag. The fictional seven-year-old’s strong following made her latest adventure, “Lulu and the Dog by the Sea,” an easy pick for Elizabeth Pearson, head of children’s titles for the Miami-Dade library system. Then came the tough decision: Which libraries wouldn’t get the popular book?” (via MiamiHerald.com)

Comments Off

The Future of Books Looks a Lot Like Netflix

“Struggling against plunging prices and a shrinking audience, book publishers think they’ve found a compelling vision for the future: magazines. oday, the San Francisco-based literary startup Plympton launched an online fiction service called Rooster. It’s sold by subscription. It’s priced by the month. And it automatically delivers regular content to your iPhone or iPad. In other words, it’s a book service that’s packaged like a magazine service. And it’s just the latest example of how books are being packaged like magazines. With Rooster, readers pay $5 per month in exchange for a stream of bite-sized chunks of fiction. Each chunk takes just 15 minutes or so to read, and over the course of a month, they add up to two books. The service builds on the success of Plympton’s Daily Lit, which emails you classic literature in five-minute installments.” (via )

Comments Off

Publishers Are Warming to Fan Fiction, But Can It Go Mainstream?

“Kady Morrison’s debut novel, Juniper Lane, won’t be on store shelves for months, but already her fans number in the six figures. They’re familiar with her work from Archive of Our Own, a fanwork site where Morrison writes fanfic under the handle gyzym. Her publisher, Big Bang Press, is well aware—in fact, it links to her Ao3 page directly from its website. For a conventional publisher to acknowledge, let alone link directly to, a writers’ fan fiction is unprecedented, but Big Bang specializes in original works by authors recruited from the fan-fiction community.” (via Wired.com)

Comments Off

American Booksellers Association Partners With NetGalley to Bring Digital Galleys to Indie Bookstores

“The American Booksellers Association (ABA) and NetGalley today announced the launch of the Digital White Box program, which will allow publishers to introduce new titles exclusively to ABA members via NetGalley. The program will help more individual booksellers read new titles earlier, from a diverse group of publishers and genres, and will be available for ABA members only, via a sign-up on the ABA site. There are over 10,000 bookseller members worldwide registered on NetGalley; the service is free for booksellers and other professional readers.” (via Digital Book World)

Comments Off

TEXAS LIBRARY OFFERS GLIMPSE OF BOOKLESS FUTURE

“Texas has seen the future of the public library, and it looks a lot like an Apple Store: Rows of glossy iMacs beckon. iPads mounted on a tangerine-colored bar invite readers. And hundreds of other tablets stand ready for checkout to anyone with a borrowing card. Even the librarians imitate Apple’s dress code, wearing matching shirts and that standard-bearer of geek-chic, the hoodie. But this $2.3 million library might be most notable for what it does not have – any actual books.” (via The Associated Press)

Comments Off

D.C. schools get thousands of new library books, musical instruments, computers

“D.C. Public Schools announced Thursday that it has purchased 85,000 new books for school libraries around the city, an investment that comes after years of pressure from parents and activists. Schools also have received 4,000 new musical instruments, 2,000 desktop computers and more than 1,300 laptops and tablets, as well as art supplies and science lab equipment.” (via The Washington Post)

Comments Off

A tomb for tomes: Warehouse holds 24,511 library books awaiting dumpster

“Public library books are sent to the dumpster when they violate what some Lafayette librarians jokingly call the “three booger rule.” The term refers to books too soiled, stinky or damaged to be saved. The Lafayette Public Library will need to junk 24,511 such books this year. Library administrator Teresa Elberson used a battered copy of “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” to explain.” (via The Advertiser)

Comments Off

© Copyright 2014, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.