Tag Archives: Archives

THEATER HUNTS FOR LOST MUSICALS AND PUTS THEM ON

“Don’t be fooled by how mild-mannered Ben West seems. He’s the musical theater world’s Sherlock Holmes and Victor Frankenstein rolled into one. As artistic director of the nonprofit UnsungMusicalsCo. Inc., West scours libraries, newspaper archives and databases for overlooked and undervalued musicals. Then he breathes life into them.” (via The Associated Press)

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LAST NIXON TAPES TO BE RELEASED COVER KEY PERIOD

“The final installment of secretly recorded phone calls and meetings from President Richard Nixon’s White House will be released Wednesday, marking a final chapter in a campaign for public access that continues as memories of Watergate fade. The recordings cap the chronological release of 3,000 hours of tapes Nixon recorded between February 1971 and July 1973 that have been released by the National Archives and Records Administration. The final installment covers the tumultuous three months when Watergate was closing in on the 37th president. Still, he forged ahead with Soviet peace talks, worked to cement Chinese relations and welcomed home Vietnam prisoners of war.” (via Associated Press)

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Archives of Ernst & Young Founders Donated to Case Western Reserve University Kelvin Smith Library

“Ernst & Young (EY), the global “Big Four” professional services firm formed via the 1989 merger of Ernst & Whinney and Arthur Young & Company, has gifted its historical archives to Case Western Reserve University’s Kelvin Smith Library (KSL). The collection will be known as the Ernst & Young Founders Archive. Ernst & Whinney was founded in Cleveland as Ernst & Ernst in 1903 by Cleveland-born brothers Theodore and Alwin “A.C.” Ernst, who quickly became one of the most transformational figures in Cleveland business and civic history. Arthur Young & Co. was founded in Chicago in 1906 by brothers Arthur and Stanley Young. The archive includes such memorabilia as hand-written accounting ledgers detailing firm transactions from the early 1900s, firm advertising from the 1920s, Ernst & Ernst employee and management communications dating back more than 90 years, awards, vintage photos, Arthur Young’s personal cash book and many other historical items.” (via PRNewswire)

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Plainfield library archivists dig up personal letter from John Quincy Adams

“In case you were wondering, our sixth president really knew how to write a nice rejection letter. Taking up precisely a full page with neat, handwritten script, John Quincy Adams politely and eloquently declined an invitation to attend a Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society event in the late 1830s, citing his flagging health during a sweltering heat wave. No one might have ever known it, if not for Plainfield Public Library archivist Jeff Wassen — who said he knew the letter was part of the library’s huge collection of historic archives, but forgot about it to some degree before recently rediscovering it.” (via MyCentralJersey.com)

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The longitude problem: 300-year-old archive opened to the world

“It was the conundrum that baffled some of the greatest and most eccentric experts of the 18th century – and captivated the British public during an era of unprecedented scientific and technical transformation. Now, for the first time, the full story of attempts to solve the longitude problem – unravelling the lone genius myth popularised in film and literature – will be made freely available to everyone via Cambridge University’s Digital Library. Launched today, the complete archive of the Board of Longitude, held by Cambridge University Library and associated National Maritime Museum collections, will take their place alongside the works of Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton on the Cambridge Digital Library site.” (via Jisc)

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A New Look for the Legal Blawg Archive

“The following is a guest post by Matthew Braun, Senior Legal Research Specialist at the Law Library of Congress.  Matt has posted to the blog previously: most recently Taking the Reference Desk on the Road and Orphan Works and Fair Use in a Digital Age. For more than six years, the Law Library of Congress has been collecting images of select legal blogs on a monthly basis.  The Legal Blawg Archive was created so that the legal events detailed and analyzed in the blogs of today can be studied for years to come. Now this archive is available in an updated user interface making the collection more attractive and engaging.” (via In Custodia Legis)

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Anger greets secret private Library and Archives Canada deal

“Confusion and anger over a major, secretly brokered deal between Library and Archives Canada and a private high-tech consortium heightened Wednesday amid damage-control efforts by archive officials who say the deal is a good one. Details of the project, revealed late Tuesday by the Ottawa Citizen, would see Library and Archives hand over millions of publicly-owned books and documents to Canadiana.com which, in exchange, will get a 10-year exclusive licence to sell it in sophisticated digital format.” (via Ottawa Citizen.

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Early Tennessee Tax Lists Now Online

“April 15 can be a taxing day for all of us living in modern times, but our ancestors didn’t have it much easier. Although our federal income tax only dates back to the Civil War era, Tennesseans have been paying state and local taxes since long before then. Now Tennessee tax records dating back to 1783 are available free online to Tennesseans, thanks to a partnership between the Tennessee State Library and Archives and Ancestry.com. The online database contains records from 71 of Tennessee’s 95 counties. Famous notables like Andrew Jackson (who paid $66 in taxes to Davidson County in 1829) appear side by side with ordinary farmers, millers and laborers.” (via Tennessee Department of State)

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Stetson library holds historic treasures

“Careful not to tear the pages, Barbara Costello slowly opened one of the first books that came into Stetson Universitys federal depository collection: a volume containing condolences from throughout the world following the April 14, 1865, assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Detailed artwork is still visible on the outside while the writing inside reveals the “flowery language” of the time.” (via News-JournalOnline.com)

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Libraries’ move to digital poses risks, benefits

“Archive libraries, such as the Hoole Special Collections on campus, are increasingly converting their content into digital copies. But what may be a convenience for students can be problematic for archivists. As archives are digitized, there is concern that the technology which records are stored on will become out of date – just look at the floppy disk. “That’s where our difficulty lies more than anything else is that, how do you keep a permanent or long-term record in a digital format when you can’t guarantee its lifespan?” Tom Land, the institutional records analyst at Hoole, said. “We know what paper will do and we know what microfilm will do, but the digital stuff is different; our technology is changing about every year and a half.” (via Crimson White)

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