Tag Archives: amazon.com

Hachette, Amazon end nasty feud with deal on book sales

“Publisher Hachette and Amazon ended Thursday an acrimonious feud over online book sales that highlighted Amazon’s market dominance and fuelled protests from leading authors like John Grisham and Stephen King. After six months in which Amazon clamped down on sales of Hachette Publishing Group books on its website, the two announced a multi-year agreement on ebook and print book sales in the US market.” (via AFP)

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Researching Amazon and Libraries

“I am pleased to announce that I will be working with Deanna Marcum and Roger Schonfeld of Ithaka S+R on a project to survey Amazon’s sales to academic libraries. This research is being funded with the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This project has been a long time a-coming, and I am absolutely delighted to be involved with it.” (via The Scholarly Kitchen)

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Is Amazon Bad for Books?

“Amazon is a global superstore, like Walmart. It’s also a hardware manufacturer, like Apple, and a utility, like Con Edison, and a video distributor, like Netflix, and a book publisher, like Random House, and a production studio, like Paramount, and a literary magazine, like The Paris Review, and a grocery deliverer, like FreshDirect, and someday it might be a package service, like U.P.S. Its founder and chief executive, Jeff Bezos, also owns a major newspaper, the Washington Post. All these streams and tributaries make Amazon something radically new in the history of American business. Sam Walton wanted merely to be the world’s biggest retailer. After Apple launched the iPod, Steve Jobs didn’t sign up pop stars for recording contracts. A.T. & T. doesn’t build transmission towers and rent them to smaller phone companies, the way Amazon Web Services provides server infrastructure for startups (not to mention the C.I.A.). Amazon’s identity and goals are never clear and always fluid, which makes the company destabilizing and intimidating. (via The New Yorker)

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Kindle Vending Machine Shows How Amazon Could Take Over the World

“Though there’s nothing new about electronics vending machines, any foray by Amazon into the world of offline retail is a big deal. When Amazon ventures into the physical world — whether with in-store delivery lockers or grocery trucks or vending machines — the company’s sheer scale and ambition demand that you think in terms of world domination.” (via Wired)

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Brick-And-Mortar Bookstores Play The Print Card Against Amazon

“When it comes to book publishing, all we ever seem to hear about is online sales, the growth of e-books and the latest version of a digital book reader. But the fact is, only 20 percent of the book market is e-books; it’s still dominated by print. And a recent standoff in the book business shows how good old-fashioned, brick-and-mortar bookstores are still trying to wield their influence in the industry. You might even call it brick-and-mortar booksellers’ revenge.” (via NPR)

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Amazon removes abuse-themed e-books from store

“Retailer Amazon has removed several abuse-themed e-books from its Kindle Store after a report highlighted titles depicting rape, incest and bestiality. Titles such as Taking My Drunk Daughter had been on sale. Amazon and Barnes & Noble both say they are removing books found by technology news site The Kernel, but many others still remain, the BBC has found.” (via BBC News)

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Amazon.com Announces the Most Well-Read Cities in America

“Amazon.com today announced its third annual list of the Most Well-Read Cities in America. The ranking was determined by compiling sales data of all book, magazine and newspaper sales in both print and Kindle format since June 1, 2012, on a per capita basis in cities with more than 100,000 residents.” (via Amazon Media Room)

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Book publishers blast Amazon’s plan to control domain names

“Amazon’s effort to control dozens of new generic top-level Internet domain names is drawing fire from a pair of publishing industry groups.

The Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers oppose the Internet retail giant’s plan to control so-called generic top-level domains (gTLD) that end in suffixes .book, .author, and .read, arguing that such influence would be anti-competitive. “Placing such generic domains in private hands is plainly anticompetitive, allowing already dominant, well-capitalized companies to expand and entrench their market power,” Authors Guild President Scott Turow wrote to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, the nonprofit that oversees the world’s Internet domain names. “The potential for abuse seems limitless.”

via CNET News

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Amazon Might Start Selling Used E-Books

“Amazon was awarded a patent for a system to sell previously owned digital objects like e-books and audio downloads, reports Publisher’s Weekly. Amazon already has a long-standing secondhand market for physical books, so despite the weird concept of “owning” someone’s used ones and zeroes, this is actually quite possible with Amazon’s DRM.”

via Business Insider

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Simon & Schuster Has a New Deal With Amazon, Other Retailers

“Simon & Schuster has signed a new ebook retail agreement with Amazon and other ebook retailers. Ebook prices were lowered for Simon & Schuster titles over the weekend on sites like Amazon and Nook.com to levels several dollars below what they had been earlier in the week. Amazon is no longer displaying its usual disclaimer for agency-priced ebooks, “this price was set by the publisher,” for Simon & Schuster titles. “We have entered new agreements with our ebook agents that are in compliance with DOJ settlement and we look forward to working with our retailers to expand the readership for our authors and grow the ebook marketplace,” said Adam Rothberg, senior vice president of corporate communications for Simon & Schuster.”

via Digital Book World

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