Omaha City Council likely to restore some funds for libraries, but other budget vetoes expected to stand\

“Omaha City Council members say they’re worried about long waiting lists for new books at Omaha libraries, and they’re not inclined to cut funding and risk even longer wait times. Councilman Chris Jerram said he expects the council to override a mayoral budget veto and restore $175,000 for new materials at the library in 2015. Councilman Rich Pahls, who had provided the crucial fifth vote for the library funding, said he will vote for an override on Tuesday.” (via Omaha.com)

Leave a Comment

Denver Public Library takes on Soundcloud with local digital music service, Volume

Like books, CDs have gone the way of vinyl and cassette. This generation’s musicians are emerging in a digital landscape. Albums are sold as MP3s, branding is done through social media, and many times the instruments themselves are nothing more than laptops and hard drives. Music, along with technology, moves quickly, and it’s up to traditionalists to catch up. On the year of its 125th birthday, the Denver Public Library is hitting play on a digital means to disseminate local music to the community.” (via Reverb)

Leave a Comment

IMLS Awards Grant to OCLC to Help Libraries Continue to Support Community Health Initiatives

“The Institute of Museum and Library Services has awarded OCLC a grant to continue work helping libraries support health information initiatives in their communities. In July 2013, OCLC received an IMLS grant to increase libraries’ ability to respond to customer health information needs, launching the “Health Happens in Libraries” program. IMLS is supporting an expansion of that effort with a $199,050 grant to OCLC. OCLC and its partner, ZeroDivide, will develop additional resources for individual libraries to highlight ways they can lead or support health initiatives.” (via IMLS)

Leave a Comment

Literary treasures from Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries

“Where can you find locks of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s and Mary Shelley’s hair alongside the fragments of Sappho’s poetry? At the Bodleain Libraries in Oxford, England. And also in the book “Marks of Genius: Masterpieces from the Collection of the Bodleian Libraries.” The book includes writings and drawings and ephemera dating from ancient times — Sappho’s fragments are from the 2nd century AD — to the 20th century. Over all that time what constitutes genius has changed.” (via LA Times)

Leave a Comment

Shanghai Library adds 2 million records to WorldCat to share its collection with the world

“Shanghai Library, the largest public library in China and one of the largest libraries in the world, has contributed 2 million holdings to WorldCat, including some 770,000 unique bibliographic records, to share its collection worldwide. These records, which represent books and journals published between 1911 and 2013, were loaded in WorldCat earlier this year. The contribution from Shanghai Library, an OCLC member since 1996, enhances the richness and depth of Chinese materials in WorldCat as well as the discoverability of these collections around the world.” (via OCLC)

Leave a Comment

The Data-driven Library of the Future

“Last November, Portland-based library design consultant Aaron Schmidt wrote on Twitter that he wanted to create logos and visual identity packages for libraries. His first rule: “no likenesses of books.” It goes without saying that libraries are changing from repositories for journals and books to engaged community centers which offer new services that not only respond to innovative research but help shape it.” (via Inside Higher Ed)

Leave a Comment

Why Your Library May Soon Have Laser Cutters and 3-D Printers

“Visit the downtown branch of the Chattanooga Public Library and you’ll find the usual stuff: rows of books, magazines, and computers. But walk up to the fourth floor and there’s something unexpected. It’s a “makerspace”—complete with a laser cutter, a zine lab for making paper publications, and a 3-D printer. There’s even a loom.” (via WIRED)

Leave a Comment

Faculty members at U. of Colorado at Boulder criticize Oxford U. Press ebook quality

“An institution’s decision to drop print books for ebooks may rankle traditionalists, but at the University Colorado at Boulder, it’s the open-to-innovation crowd that is speaking out. CU-Boulder is one of many institutions that have moved away from stocking print books to signing ebook subscription deals with publishers. Such deals often come with a score of benefits beyond cost savings. For example, new books automatically appear in the library at regular intervals, often packaged with tools to speed up the discovery and research processes. The shift from print to digital also frees up room previously devoted to stacks, giving the library room to add more collaborative space, 3D printers and whatever other amenities 21st-century library-goers desire.” (via insidehighered)

Leave a Comment

Libraries helping authors with e-publishing

“A partnership between the Henderson County Public Library and the Daviess County Public Library is aiming to help new writers find a market with electronic publishing. Library officials say the effort will also help published writers sell more books.

Interested authors can access a website — epublishorbust.com — and do the publishing themselves.

“We don’t publish the books for them,” Henderson library Director Essy Day told The Gleaner (http://bit.ly/1BZ5r5l). “We provide the resources to help them do it themselves. It’s like a one-stop website that gives you tools and resources, and we also have a calendar where they can book a date at a library to come and promote their work.” (via Louisville)

Leave a Comment

Welcome the Internet Archive to The [Flickr] Commons

“Over the past couple of weeks, The Internet Archive has already been uploading content behind the scenes, and today we are very excited to officially launch them into The Commons. The Internet Archive is best known for its historical library of the web, preserving more than 400 billion web pages dating back to 1996. Yet, its 19 petabytes include more than 600 million pages of digitized texts dating back more than 500 years. What would it look like if those 600 million pages could be “read” completely differently? What if every illustration, drawing, chart, map, or photograph became an entry point, allowing one to navigate the world’s books not as paragraphs of text, but as a visual tapestry of our lives? How would we learn and explore knowledge differently? Those were the questions that launched a project to catalog the imagery of half a millennium of books.” (via Flickr Blog)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2014, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.