Omaha’s proposed budget would cut funding for libraries

“If you’ve been patiently waiting for a library copy of a best-seller like “The Fault in Our Stars,” the City of Omaha’s proposed budget for next year might come with some bad news. The plan headed to the City Council for a public hearing Tuesday comes with a cut for the city’s libraries; the department’s $13.1 million budget is down about 5 percent from last year. To avoid cutting staff or library hours, officials have plans to reduce the library’s materials budget — which means fewer opportunities to buy new books, e-books, DVDs and other materials, and longer wait times for some of the most popular titles.” (via Omaha.com)

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Detroit library could be site of another Batman v Superman shoot

“Access to parts of the Detroit Library’s main branch was limited Friday because of what library personnel said were preparations for the filming of a scene for a major movie production. The 149-year-old library’s ornate third floor will be the site of more Detroit filming for “Batman v Superman,” security guards told patrons as they turned them away from elevators and staircases Friday.” (via MLive.com)

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Proposed Dallas budget would cut cops, boost streets and libraries

“In a rare decision during a nonrecession year, Dallas’ city manager is proposing a slight reduction in the number of police officers next fiscal year. Under the proposed budget unveiled Friday by City Manager A.C. Gonzalez, the Police Department’s sworn ranks would shrink by about 35 through attrition. That modest reduction — the force has more than 3,500 officers — is part of a broader effort to shave the department’s budget and use the savings to pay for other services that have shrunk in recent years, Gonzalez said.” The beneficiaries would include libraries, streets and animal services.” (via Dallas Morning News)

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How Target is Infiltrating Public Schools to Build Customers for Life

“I am the teacher-librarian in one of two San Francisco school libraries remodeled by the big-box chain Target, in partnership with the Heart of America Foundation (HOA). HOA, which coordinates corporate volunteer programs focused on literacy, provides a few different options, including the one Target picked: the READesign® Library Makeover Program. On its website, HOA promises to handle all the details for the sponsoring partner, making the experience simple but meaningful: “As soon as we know your desired market, we do the rest.” (via Alternet)

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This Librarian Is Not Impressed With Your Digital, No-Books Library

“I’m young for a librarian — 34 in a field where the median age is over 50. It should go without saying then that I’m not the least bit afraid of technology. Digital tools make me far more productive at what I do. However, as a member of the only profession dedicated to mastering, or at very least thinking about, the epistemology of all human discourses, I can tell you that books on a shelf arranged by the Dewey Decimal System (or Library of Congress Classification or UDC or Bliss or any other well-developed scheme) are an essential and invaluable architecture of human discovery and understanding.” (via NextCity)

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Unpopular books flying off branch libraries’ shelves

“At the Dudley Branch of the Boston Public Library, clustered volumes fill only half of many long, red shelves; the rest stand empty. In the adult nonfiction section, some shelves are completely barren. The library, in Roxbury, once brimmed with books. But officials have been steadily culling its collection the past few months as part of a push by BPL administrators to dispose of up to 180,000 little-used volumes from shelves and archives of branches citywide by year’s end. Library officials say the reductions help assure that patrons can comfortably sift through a modern selection that serves their needs.” (via Boston Globe)

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Paul Otlet, Google, Wikipedia, and cataloging the world

“As soon as humanity began its quest for knowledge, people have also attempted to organize that knowledge. From the invention of writing to the abacus, from medieval manuscripts to modern paperbacks, from microfiche to the Internet, our attempt to understand the world — and catalog it in an orderly fashion with dictionaries, encyclopedias, libraries, and databases — has evolved with new technologies. One man on the quest for order was innovator, idealist, and scientist Paul Otlet, who is the subject of the new book Cataloging the World. We spoke to author Alex Wright about his research process, Paul Otlet’s foresight into the future of global information networks, and Otlet’s place in the history of science and technology.” (via OUPblog)

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National Geographic joins Scribd

“We’re thrilled to announce another great addition of some of National Geographic’s most popular titles to our library of more than 400,000 books. A lot of us have fond memories of the iconic yellow border gracing the bookshelves and coffee tables of our youth, and we’re proud to bring these world-expanding titles to Scribd. “Scribd’s wide audience and established brand make them a natural partner. We are very pleased to be adding our books to their flagship subscription product and attracting new readers around the globe,” says Rachel Graham, Senior Director of Digital Book Publishing for National Geographic.” (via The Scribd Blog)

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LINCOLN’S HANDWRITING FOUND ON BOOK ABOUT RACE

“For years, librarians at a small central Illinois library gossiped that a tattered book lying on one of its shelves justifying racism may have been in the hands of none other than Abraham Lincoln, the Great Emancipator. On Tuesday, state historians confirmed that theory by announcing Lincoln’s handwriting had been found inside the cover of the 700-page text, at the same time taking great pains to offer reassurance that the former president who ended slavery didn’t subscribe to the theories at hand, but likely read the book to better educate himself about his opponents’ line of thinking.” (via The Associated Press)

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Amazon Same-Day Delivery Expanding – “Get It Today” Available in Six More Cities

“Amazon.com has expanded Same-Day Delivery with new “Get It Today” capabilities for customers in Baltimore, Dallas, Indianapolis, New York City, Philadelphia and Washington DC metro areas, with more than a million eligible items now available for same-day delivery. Starting today, customers can order as late as noon, seven days a week and get things like popular movies, video games, last-minute travel needs, back-to-school supplies and family necessities delivered to their home the same day. Prime members pay $5.99 for all the same-day delivery items they can order.” (via Amazon)

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