Gale Brings Millions of Pages of Treasured Historical Content to Academic Libraries

“Gale, part of Cengage Learning, has added millions of pages of content to its Gale Digital Collections program with the launch of 10 resources, including new periodical collections and the next installments of Smithsonian Collections Online, Nineteenth Century Collections Online, and The Chatham House Online Archive. Researchers now have access to digitized versions of venerated materials such as recordings and transcripts of speeches from Winston Churchill and Henry Kissinger, and photos and exhibition catalogs of World’s Fairs, among others. These collections will be available on the Gale Artemis: Primary Sources platform, giving researchers access to graphing and search visualization tools that will help them explore this historical content in new ways.” (via Cengage Learning)

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Study: To preserve digital resources, institutions should play to their strengths

“The efforts to preserve digital humanities research are as numerous as the definitions of the catchall term, according to a report that urges institutions to develop their own strategies to preserve resources that can’t simply be bound and stored in a library. The report, “Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host Institution Support Beyond the Start-Up Phase,” represents an effort by co-authors Nancy L. Maron and Sarah Pickle, a program director and analyst at the consulting firm Ithaka S+R, respectively, to study how institutions support digital resources created on their campuses. The work builds on an earlier report that looked at similar efforts in the United Kingdom.” (via insidehighered)

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SIMON & SCHUSTER EXPANDS LIBRARY EBOOK LENDING PROGRAM TO UNIVERSAL ACCESS

“Simon & Schuster announced today that, following a successful pilot program in more than twenty library systems, it was moving to expand access to its catalog of ebooks to libraries nationwide. Effective immediately, public libraries across the United States can acquire for their collections ebook editions of such beloved classic favorites and current bestsellers as The Great Gatsby, Steve Jobs, Doctor Sleep, Hard Choices, The Flamethrowers, The Light Between Oceans, The Perks of Being a Wallflower and the Mortal Instruments and Dork Diaries series.” (via Simon & Schuster)

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New York Public Library Receives First City Funding Increase In Six Years

“The New York Public Library will receive a $4.4 million increase in city operating funds for Fiscal Year 2015, according to the new city budget, unveiled today by Mayor Bill de Blasio, City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, and the New York City Council. The increase – the first for the system since Fiscal Year 2008 – brings NYPL’s total city operating budget to about $144 million. It is part of a $10 million increase in funding to all three of the city’s Library systems, including the Brooklyn Public Library and Queens Library.” (via The New York Public Library)

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Queens Public Library trustees plan to remove Thomas Galante as director — then give him consulting job that pays $800G

“The trustees of the Queens Public Library have scheduled an emergency meeting for Thursday night to remove their controversial director Thomas Galante, while also granting him more than $800,000 in a golden parachute consulting deal, the Daily News has learned. Word of the hastily scheduled meeting prompted Public Advocate Letitia James, an ex-officio member of the library’s board, to request State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who regulates non-profit organizations, to join her in seeking a court order to halt the proposed vote.” (via NY Daily News)

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Photographer brings libraries into focus

“West Philadelphia-based photographer Kyle Cassidy has made a career of sidestepping political land mines as he dives deep into American subcultures. Consider, for example, his 2007 book Armed America: Portraits of Gun Owners in Their Homes.But in February, he published a photo essay that really touched a nerve. The subject? Librarians.”Certainly, the gun book was much less controversial,” he said.” (via Philly.com)

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E-rate reform: A sustainable path forward for school and library connectivity

“A year ago, President Obama unveiled the ConnectED initiative, declaring that his goal was to connect virtually every school in the United States to high-speed Internet by the end of the decade. A key piece of the administration’s plan is reforming the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) E-rate program, which subsidizes communications services for schools and libraries across the country. There’s been a flurry of activity in the past year aimed at addressing the broadband gaps that make it increasingly difficult for schools and libraries to use 21st century digital-learning tools. A wide range of stakeholders weighed in during two rounds of comments at the FCC, and everyone from Obama to local leaders and tech CEOs have called to upgrade America’s aging broadband infrastructure. Now, as students and teachers prepare for summer break, the FCC is gearing up to make changes in time to impact the 2015 E-rate funding cycle. The exact details are still being ironed out, but it’s clear that more reforms will be needed in addition to those being discussed for the commission’s open meeting in July.” (via The Hill)

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Public libraries offering streaming under new model that allows for unlimited patrons to view a title simultaneously

“Try to check out a hot new book or movie at your local library, and you’re likely to get put on a long waiting list. Libraries in the Chicago area are trying to change that by offering a new online checkout service. Instead of having a limited number of each book or movie, they can now offer unlimited access to titles — sometimes on the day they’re released in stores. The service is called hoopla digital and it’s available through a mobile app or web browser at the Chicago Public Library and 23 suburban libraries. It first came online last year and is now in 300 libraries nationwide, including opening June 23 in Oak Park and an expected Aug. 1 launch in Palatine.” (via chicagotribune.com)

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OverDrive signs deal with Warner Bros. Digital Distribution for streaming video lending through U.S. and Canadian libraries

“OverDrive today announced an agreement with Warner Bros. Digital Distribution to offer hundreds of popular streaming video titles to public and government library partners in the U.S. and Canada. This deal expands a growing collection of thousands of quality, in-demand streaming videos available through OverDrive, and reinforces the value of an unmatched catalog on one single platform for eBooks, audiobooks and streaming video. With the addition of Warner Bros. films, libraries will be able to benefit from a transactional, pay-per-use lending model from OverDrive for the first time. This model eliminates the need to purchase titles in advance of their use and ensures that titles are available instantly to all patrons simultaneously. Libraries will soon be able to browse or search for Warner Bros. titles from the expansive catalog in OverDrive Marketplace, and curate their collection to match the unique interests of their communities. As with other content and access models from OverDrive, libraries will set user lending policies for Warner Bros. movies to manage costs within their material budgets.” (via OverDrive Blogs)

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In NJ, little libraries with big results

“Resting on a post near the sidewalk on Tuxedo Road in Montclair is a miniature house, cobbled together from a wine crate, leftover construction shingles and other scrap materials. Behind the glass door are about 20 books of various genres arranged on a shelf. This is the Little Free Library, something of a community spot for meeting and reading, where no library card is needed and no late fees are charged. “It’s a very eclectic mix and it’s all community-driven,” says the library’s steward, Jon Bonesteel, of his revolving catalog. “Oftentimes, I’ll come home to find bags of books on my front porch that I can then cycle through the library, and they tend to go. It’s nice to see the turnover of the books.” (via NJ.com)

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