National Archives Awards $2.2 Million in Grants for Historical Records Projects

“Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero today awarded 35 grants and one cooperative agreement totaling $2,186,024 to projects being undertaken in 27 states, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia. The National Archives grants program is carried out through the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC). A complete list of new grants is online.” (via National Archives)

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Following L.A.’s history through maps

“For the last couple of years, Los Angeles Public Library map librarian Glen Creason has been involved in one of the most interesting literary projects in Southern California: to write each week, on the Citythink blog of Los Angeles magazine, about a map from the library’s collection. The idea is to excavate the hidden history of the city, an endeavor with which I have an abiding sympathy. Part of the reason L.A. continues to confound so many of us, after all, is its complicated relationship with its past. The history is right there, on the surface, and yet we don’t see it, not really, even now.” (via LA Times)

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Today [Google Maps] turns 10!

“For 10 years Google Maps has made it easier to navigate and explore your world. If you hopped in your DeLorean for a trip back to before 2005, you’d remember the days when we were all dependent on paper maps, print-outs, post-its and sometimes even a compass for directions! Getting from point A to B is something we do all day, every day—from finding the fastest way to get to work, to dropping the kids off on a carpool route, to meeting friends for drinks at a new spot—so it should be as easy as possible. That’s why we created Google Maps and why we’ve spent the last 10 years figuring out better ways for you to get around.” (via Google Lat Long)

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Sleds join case books at [Yale] Law Library

“This winter, students interested in frolicking in the snow can check out sleds and shovels from an unlikely source: the Law Library. The winter gear joins a long list of useful yet unconventional items in circulation at the Lillian Goldman Library, including blankets with sleeves and DVDs. The library boasts games, sporting gear, tech equipment and study tools. In the past, the library unofficially has also allowed undergraduates to check out items, provided that there are enough in circulation. Now, policy has changed so that Yale College students can check out anything from the Law Library, except for iPads and laptops. “We tried to think of what students lack when they’re away from home, what don’t they have in the dorm room or apartment,” said Julian Aiken, head of Access Services at the library. “The list of things we check out will only be limited by our own imagination or the ideas of students — if we can fit it in the library and check it out, we will.” (via Yale Daily News)

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Newly launched Posen Digital Library makes available Jewish literature, art, artifacts and more

“Yale University Press has launched the Posen Digital Library, which makes available online the artworks, literary works, and artifacts from The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization. Created by Yale University Press and the Posen Foundation, the 10-volume Posen Library collects the best of Jewish culture from throughout the ages, from biblical times to the present. The first volume, covering the period from 1973 to 2005, was published in print in November, 2012. James E. Young, professor of English and Judaic studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is the Posen Library’s editor-in-chief.” (via YaleNews)

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Rosa Parks Collection Comes To Library Of Congress

“Thousands of letters, writings and notes by civil rights icon Rosa Parks were opened to researchers this week at the Library of Congress. Audie Cornish speaks with Senior Archives Specialist Margaret Mcaleer, who curated the material, about some of the lesser-known aspects of Park’s life, including her correspondence with her husband Raymond, their deep dive into poverty and a secret family recipe.” (via NPR)

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How libraries are using technology to ‘stay up to speed’ with patrons

“Attendees at the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting got glimpses of the library of the future as companies offered products to move libraries well beyond books. The event at McCormick Place included pitches from companies such as E-Learning’s Driving-Tests.org, which provides online practice driver-education tests to libraries. There was also discussion on technology and services that libraries increasingly are making available to the public, such as Google Glass, Oculus Rift and — in the case of the Chicago Public Library — WiFi.” (via Chicago Tribune)

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Gale Revamps Popular Product Lines to Create a Unified, Improved and Mobile-Optimized User Experience

“In response to extensive user testing and usage data, Gale, part of Cengage Learning, will introduce a number of enhancements to its most widely-used product lines – GVRL, InfoTrac and In Context, including the optimization for mobile devices through responsive design. The adoption of a common design and toolset across all products will provide a unified experience as researchers move from one resource to the next, while other changes will enhance accessibility for those with disabilities and increase usability overall for desktop and mobile researchers.” (via Cengage Learning)

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Legislation Email Alerts on Congress.gov

“Moving from a 20-year-old system to our new, modern Congress.gov platform has many advantages. One of these is that, starting today, email alerts are available on Congress.gov.  There are three different types of alerts in this initial release: Member of Congress, legislation, and the Congressional Record.  Bill and member alerts were an often-requested feature on THOMAS and I’m excited that we are now able to fulfill those requests in the new system.” (via In Custodia Legis)

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Elsevier Now Adding eBooks to CLOCKSS Archiving

“Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced its agreement to participate in CLOCKSS (Controlled Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) archiving of ebooks. CLOCKSS is a community-governed archive committed to open access. As a not-for-profit venture between academic publishers and research libraries, CLOCKSS is building a sustainable, geographically distributed archive. This ensures the long-term survival of Web-based scholarly publications, such as Elsevier science and technology ebooks, for the benefit of the greater global research community.” (via Elsevier)

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