From Gleiwitz to Shanghai, Digitized Periodicals offer Snapshots of Jewish Life

“The LBI Library is pleased to announce that about 60 new periodicals are already available online through DigiBaeck and Internet Archive, with about 40 further periodicals in process. Among the rare items now available are 20th -century newsletters from various Jewish communities in Germany, Austria, and other German-speaking areas. Other highlights include publications from German-Jewish organizations such as Zionist, youth, and sports clubs and an extensive collection of periodicals published in the 1930s and 1940s by German Jews in exile in Shanghai and New York.” (via LBI)

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Audiobooks are here!

“Today is a huge day for Scribd. We’ve just added more than 30,000 audiobooks to our library, including new releases and bestsellers like The Drop by Dennis Lehane, How to Build a Girl by Caitlin Moran, Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay, The Hard Thing About Hard Things by Ben Horowitz, The Hunger Games Trilogy, and Divergent, all available on Scribd. That makes us (we’re extremely pleased to say) the largest unlimited e-book & audiobook subscription service around.” (via The Scribd Blog)

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Library faces budget constraints

“Libraries do their best to adapt to changing times, but the times are not always kind to them. The library system at Yale, along with other Ivy League universities, has focused increasingly on digital media and collaboration in recent years. Recent innovations include Borrow Direct Plus — a service that allows students to borrow books from other university libraries on-site — and a new search system for the library catalogue website. But despite its best efforts to expand and innovate, the library has been affected by significant funding cuts Yale’s collection spending budget, for instance, was cut significantly between 2009 and 2010 in light of the economic downturn. While data from 2013 shows that spending has neared pre-recession levels, the library is still grappling with the inflation of collections media — the rate at which the price of materials is continuously increasing.” (via Yale Daily News)

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Washington County Library listing among nation’s best may be inaccurate, director says

“Washington County libraries may inaccurately be listed among the nation’s best. Or they could be even better than recently rated. The Library Journal, a publication dedicated to library-related topics, gave Washington County Cooperative Library Services four stars in its 2014 index, which came out this week. The index is a national rating system that relies on annual data reported by public libraries and compiled by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The Library Journal rates libraries based on per-capita criteria including circulation, visits, program attendance and public Internet computer use.” (via OregonLive.com)

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Franklin Park library hopes photos will prevent unknown card use

“Starting in 2015, patrons of the Franklin Park Library will need to have their photos taken when renewing their library cards. The library aims to snap shots of all its patrons for its records. The new policy is due to some patrons using library cards that are not their own. “Sometimes people check out materials on other people’s cards and don’t return them,” said Library Director Marie Saeli. “Other times it has to do with computer use. Someone will [look up] something inappropriate for a library. We will bar their privileges and then the real card owner comes and says, ‘Why can’t I get on the computer?’” (via Franklin Park Herald-Journal)

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Picking The Locks: Redefining Copyright Law In The Digital Age

“Information wants to be free. At least that’s what Internet activists and many consumers say in support of free online content. But when we stream a new film online or listen to music on Spotify, we don’t always consider — or care about — the artists who are losing out. The debates over intellectual property, copyright and traditional ideas of enforcement have been hot topics of late. The fall of Napster in the late ’90s and the current battle between publisher Hachette and Amazon show that copyright law needs to be rewritten to fit digital standards.” (via NPR)

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Four Law Libraries That Fit in Your Pocket

“On-the-go legal research is an important aspect of any law professional’s career. A firm might subscribe to any number of research services, each with different features. The following comparison of popular services’ mobile apps shows how to make the most of each one, whether you’re using a smartphone, a tablet, or even a PC or Mac.” (via ITI)

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Old becomes new: California State Library digitizes 3-D images from 1800s

“They’re coming out of the vault and into the digital age. In slow but meticulous work at the California State Library in downtown Sacramento, more than 10,000 old sepia-toned 3-D photos – most from the 1800s – are being dusted off and converted to computer-ready images. Officially known as stereoscopic photos, they were a popular turn-of-the-century parlor activity, shared like postcards and viewed through hand-held viewers that turned the side-by-side double photos into a single 3-D image.” (via The Sacramento Bee)

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America’s Star Libraries, 2014: Top-Rated Libraries

“We are very pleased to announce the results of the seventh edition of the Library Journal Index of Public Library Service, sponsored by Baker & Taylor’s Bibliostat. The LJ Index is a measurement tool that compares U.S. public libraries with their spending peers based on four types of output measures of their per capita use. For this year’s Star Libraries, please click on “The Star Libraries” above; for more on what’s next for the index, see pa”What’s Next for the LJ Index”. When the LJ Index and its Star Library ratings were introduced in 2008, our hope was that whether libraries were awarded stars or not, they would examine these statistics more closely—both for their own library and for their peers—and make fuller use of these and other types of data for local planning and evaluation purposes.” (via Library Journal)

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Campaign to free our history – reform copyright

“During the First World War Centenary, a collection of leading museums, libraries and cultural organisations have launched a campaign to provide greater access to important historical works through copyright law reform. Display cases in the Imperial War Museum, National Library of Scotland and University of Leeds sit empty. They should contain letters from the First World War; from a young girl to her father serving as a soldier and from soldiers to their families back home. Because of current UK copyright laws the original letters cannot be displayed. At the moment the duration of copyright in certain unpublished works is to the end of the year 2039, regardless how old the work is. The Free Our History campaign wants the term of copyright protection in unpublished texts to be reduced to the author’s lifetime plus 70 years.” (via CILIP)

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