Rosenblum: Hennepin County Library launches website, and worry, for some teen patrons

“The launch of a new website hardly is newsworthy anymore, even if it is mobile-friendly, chock full of fresh resources and boasting an improved search engine. So the developers of Hennepin County Library’s “improved” website, which was to debut in early October, might be surprised to discover that librarians, not generally considered the most raucous among us, have quite the loud roar. The librarians’ displeasure with the new website is due in part to lack of transparency and public input as the site was being created — an ironic twist, occurring as it did under the roof of society’s most revered institution of free and open information. Mostly, though, they’re alarmed by the decision to shut down two highly popular youth websites, KidLink.” (via Star Tribune)

Leave a Comment

UC Berkeley’s free speech movement interviews released to the public

“While many commemorations of UC Berkeley’s free speech movement focus on central players in the monthslong clash with the administration, a new project tells the story from different perspectives — including female activists who dealt with sexism and a student who, after a Mario Savio speech, needed a breather from all the fervent discourse.”I had to get away from it,” UC Berkeley alumna Dutch Key told a historian. “It was too intense. I went shopping at Macy’s.”

Interviews with dozens of people who experienced the free speech movement in 1964 and 1965 are being released to the public, just in time for its 50th anniversary.” (via San Jose Mercury News)

Leave a Comment

What if libraries were more like coworking spaces?

“‘Membership’ to a library should be less about access to resources, and more about a sense of belonging, or a desire to make the library better for ALL of it’s members. But how do you invite that kind of participation?” That’s the driving idea behind a Knight News Challenge proposal from a team from coworking space Indy Hall and web dev firm P’unk Ave. What can a library learn from a coworking space? Indy Hall’s Alex Hillman and Adam Teterus, along with P’unk Ave head (and Indy Hall cofounder) Geoff DiMasi, want to train library staff how to invite collaboration from their members.” (via Technical.ly Philly)

Leave a Comment

Texas A&M opens shelves in joint library project

When books are cleared off of the shelves in university library stacks across Texas by the thousands, they have to go somewhere or else they could be ground to a pulp and recycled. That “somewhere” is a sand-colored concrete building on Texas A&M;’s Riverside campus called the Joint Library Facility, a cost- and space-saving collaboration between the Texas A&M; University and University of Texas libraries, where almost 300,000 print texts call home.” (via AP)

Leave a Comment

How Libraries Preserve E-books

“The e-book conversation so far has been dominated by concerns over the market share and intentions of Amazon, and, in the library world, whether libraries can license access to frontlist e-books from the major publishers, and if they can, at what price, under what terms, and through which intermediary. But there is a greater, long-term concern with the way our e-book future is shaping up—preservation.” (via Publishers Weekly)

Leave a Comment

Librarians won’t stay quiet about government surveillance

“In September 2003, Attorney General John Ashcroft called out the librarians. The American Library Association and civil liberties groups, he said, were pushing “baseless hysteria” about the controversial Patriot Act. He suggested that they were worried that spy agencies wanted to know “how far you have gotten on the latest Tom Clancy novel.” Ashcroft was 17 speeches into a national speaking tour defending the Patriot Act, a law expanding government surveillance powers that passed nearly unanimously in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. And all along the way, the librarians showed up to protest.” (via The Washington Post)

Leave a Comment

Here’s What You (Still) Can’t Do In The Library: The SFPL Revises Their ‘Code Of Conduct’

“When the Chronicle reported that, following a “frosty note” sent to San Francisco Public Library officials by Mayor Ed Lee, the library had come up with “a laundry list of offenses and penalties” for errant library patrons, we were intrigued! How was it possible that, as the Chron reported, the Mayor had to ask the library to create “rules that would moderate the worst problems such as fights with guards, shouting matches, and an unending plumbing clean-ups and repairs in restrooms”? How is it that the library was without these rules before now? As it turns out, they weren’t, according to SFPL spokesperson Michelle Jeffers. She tells SFist that “almost all the rules [Chron staffer Marshall Kilduff] cites in his article are not new. We’ve had these policies on the books for almost a decade now.” (via SFist)

Leave a Comment

Library of Congress Union Finds Decrease in Staff

“The Library of Congress has experienced a significant reduction in staff over the past 10 years and faces an even greater reduction as more employees near retirement, according to data gathered by an employee union. “One of the Library’s greatest resources, which is its staff, has already hemorrhaged,” Library of Congress Professional Guild president Saul Schniderman told CQ Roll Call on Monday. “This isn’t something that’s going to happen. It’s already happened.” The union represents roughly half of the library’s more than 3,000 employees.” (via Roll Call)

Leave a Comment

Librarians ‘maintaining subscriptions despite OA’

“Improved library budgets have mitigated an anticipated decline in journals subscriptions from the adoption of OA, according to US research and brokerage firm Bernstein Research.A newly prepared report from the firm, seen by The Bookseller, said the upturn in library fortunes meant they had not been progressively abandoning contracts to achieve savings as was feared two years ago. Bernstein Research had also now reversed its 2012 view that political intervention in the UK and Europe would force a shift to full OA journals, with negative consequences to publishers such as Elsevier and Wiley.” (via The Bookseller)

Leave a Comment

New IMLS Funding to Support the Digital Public Library of America Announced

“The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) announced today a $999,485 grant to the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) for a major expansion of its infrastructure. The Digital Public Library of America brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world. It strives to contain the full breadth of human expression, from the written word, to works of art and culture, to records of America’s heritage, to the efforts and data of science. DPLA aims to expand this crucial realm of openly available materials, and make those riches more easily discovered and more widely usable and used.” (via Digital Public Library of America)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2014, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.