Baton Rouge’s library system makes millions more each year — so why do officials want to raise taxes?

“Amid the debate over whether the East Baton Rouge Parish library system should raise taxes, here’s something to keep in mind: The library has been collecting millions of additional dollars most years, even without a tax hike. Though the tax rate for property owners has actually gone down over the past nine years, revenue generated by the library tax has soared. When the current tax, approved at 11.1 mills, went into effect in 2006, the system had $26.02 million in tax revenue. Thanks to millage adjustments after reassessments, the millage rate is now 10.78 mills, but the library system will earn $40.83 million from the tax in 2015 — a 57 percent increase, due to an increase in property values and new developments. Adjusted for inflation, $26.02 million in today’s dollars is $30.54 million, a little more than $10 million less than what the system is actually collecting.” (via NOLA)

Leave a Comment

This private library in Philly scans some of the world’s most prized documents

Some very impressive documents have lain on the bed of the Cruse SC 220 ST Fine Art Scanner that dominates a back room of the Athenaeum of Philadelphia. They include: Four or five copies of the Declaration of Independence. The Treaty of Paris. The text of the Emancipation Proclamation signed by President Abraham Lincoln, and the witness book from his assassination.” (via technical.ly)

Leave a Comment

The End of the Tour Official Trailer

Yes, that is R.E.M. playing in the background. Yes, this movie is about DVW. Yes, I will be seeing it on opening night.

Leave a Comment

High-tech robot greets visitors at African-Amerian library

“The African-American Research Library and Cultural Center has gone high-tech in its latest move to introduce visitors to its history and cultural treasures. The Fort Lauderdale library has unveiled an exhibit featuring a lifelike robot of Samuel F. Morrison, the former Broward County library director, the catalyst behind the library’s creation. Visitors to the library, located in the heart of the historic black Sistrunk Boulevard neighborhood, will be greeted by the Morrison robot after entering its gallery. The sensor-activated display shows Morrison seated at the edge of a desk as he gives visitors insights into the library and its surrounding community.” (via Sun Sentinel)

Leave a Comment

US, CHINESE AUTHORS PROTEST MAJOR BOOK FAIR, CENSORSHIP

“Chinese and American authors gathered Wednesday to protest a major U.S. book fair’s focus on China that they say ignores the country’s glaring problems of censorship and intimidation. Jonathan Franzen, Xiaolu Guo, Andrew Solomon, Ha Jin and others stood outside the main New York Public Library to demand that China free Nobel peace laureate Liu Xiaobo and professor Ilham Tohti from prison, stop restricting other writers and have the confidence to allow free speech.” (via AP)

Leave a Comment

The Technology Of Books Has Changed, But Bookstores Are Hanging In

“If the book is dead, nobody bothered to tell the folks at Capitol Hill Books in Washington, D.C. Books of every size, shape and genre occupy each square inch of the converted row house — including the bathroom — all arranged in an order discernible only to the mind of Jim Toole, the store’s endearingly grouchy owner. Visitors are greeted by a makeshift sign listing words that are banned in the store, including “awesome,” “perfect” and, most of all, “Amazon.” The online giant has crushed many an independent bookstore — but not Toole’s. “Hanging in here with my fingernails,” he says with a harrumph.” (via NPR)

Leave a Comment

Open-access books slowly on the rise, says PCG

Publishers and libraries are increasingly experimenting with open access (OA) books, according to a new survey by Publishers Communication Group (PCG). Books published under the gold open access model with no paywall for readers are expected to slowly grow in importance, with funding derived from a variety of sources including library budgets, the study reported. Following PCG’s 2014 survey into library adoption and funding of OA journals, the Open Access Monographs Survey sought input from both publishers who are active in and considering OA book programs, and librarians around the world who contend with new institutional OA mandates and emerging acquisition models.” (via Research Information)

Leave a Comment

The Internet can’t replace libraries: Why they matter more than ever in the age of Google

“If you were airdropped, blindfolded, into a strange town and given nothing but a bus ticket, to where would you ride that bus? You might be surprised to learn that there’s only one good answer, and that’s the public library. The library is the public living room, and if ever you are stripped of everything private—money, friends and orientation—you can go there and become a human again. Of course, you don’t have to be homeless to use a library, but that’s the point. You don’t have to be anyone in particular to go inside and stay as long as you want, sit in its armchairs, read the news, write your dissertation, charge your phone, use the bathroom, check your email, find the address of a hotel or homeless shelter. Of all the institutions we have, both public and private, the public library is the truest democratic space.” (via Salon)

Leave a Comment

How libraries in Germany are fighting extinction – and winning

“Is an e-book as much a book as a “book book”? Libraries in Germany would say yes. It seems they’re coming to grips with what many readers take for granted. “As a customer and user, I expect today to find the latest bestseller as an e-book in my local library,” Klaus-Rainer Brintzinger, chairman of the Association of German Librarians, told news agency dpa. This week in Nuremberg, Brintzinger and some 4,000 of his colleagues are discussing the future of libraries. There are 10,200 of them in Germany, 106 of which are mobile technical libraries which travel from place to place. These libraries on wheels are still very popular, especially in rural regions where it’s not possible to borrow books anywhere else.” (via dw.de)

Leave a Comment

Mayor on library art: ‘You can’t just misplace a print worth $600G’

“Mayor Martin J. Walsh today said he believes that two rare works of art worth hundreds of thousands of dollars are most likely not lost within the vast collection of the Boston Public Library, a week after officials disclosed they had begun a frenzied search. “From all indications, it’s not at the library,” Walsh said. “If it was there, I think they would have found it by now.” Library employees discovered the two works — a 1504 engraving by Albrecht Durer worth $600,000 and a 1634 Rembrandt etching worth between $20,000 and $30,000 — had vanished in April. The FBI is assisting Boston police with the investigation, which became public last week.” (via Boston Herald)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2015, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.