News stories ‘forgotten’ from Google searches

“British news outlets are having their stories removed from European Google searches under the continent’s “right to be forgotten.” The Guardian, BBC and the Daily Mail have reported that their stories are being deleted from searches within Europe, which writers worried would be a threat to journalism. At the BBC, economics journalist Robert Peston wrote that he received a notification from Google on Wednesday that the Internet giant is “no longer able to show” Europeans a link to a 2007 blog post to. The post was about a former head of investment bank Merrill Lynch who was forced out after the bank suffered “colossal losses” on some of its investments.” (via TheHill)

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Building a collection of financial education materials for a library near you

“We want to make libraries the go-to place for financial information in every community. And so far, we’ve been met with tremendous enthusiasm – from other government and nonprofit agencies, by library associations and administrators, and by librarians themselves. That’s why we’ve put together resources and materials for libraries to use in their community. We started this project about a year ago by listening to a group of nine librarians who agreed to work with us. After we announced the initiative in April, the number of libraries that wanted to participate swelled to nearly 50 library systems. Last week, we announced a partnership with Rhode Island’s Office of Library and Information Services, our first partnership with a state-wide impact, increasing our reach to more than 100 library systems. More importantly, these 100 systems have more than 450 branch locations that receive more than 76 million visits a year.” (via CFBP)

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2014 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition—thousands of engaged attendees, lively programs and events

“18,626 librarians, library workers and library supporters (including 5,607 exhibitors) from around the world joined energetically in the shared endeavor of “Transforming our libraries, ourselves” at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition, June 26-July 1 in Las Vegas. Attendees took part in spirited and productive conversations, sessions, problem-solving, events, discovery of the latest products and services and networking throughout the Las Vegas Convention Center and other venues. The program included more than 2,700 scheduled programs, sessions and events.” (via ALA)

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Brooklyn’s central library branch needs $100 million in repairs for a wrecked roof, cracked windows, creaky elevators and faulty air conditioning

“When it comes to Brooklyn’s central library branch, the books tell a story of decay. The 60-branch system’s crown jewel needs a whopping $100 million in repairs and only has enough money on hand to cover $30 million, new records show. Among the most pressing needs: a wrecked roof, cracked windows, creaky elevators, faulty air conditioning and ancient fire alarms. Bad as they are, those problems pale in comparison to the disgraceful bathrooms, which subject patrons to busted toilets and sinks and — worse — inadequate ventilation.” (via NY Daily News)

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7 surprises about libraries in our surveys

“The Pew Research Center’s studies about libraries and where they fit in the lives of their communities and patrons have uncovered some surprising facts about what Americans think of libraries and the way they use them. As librarians around the world are gathered in Las Vegas for the American Library Association’s annual conference, here are findings that stand out from our research, our typology of public library engagement and the quiz we just released that people can take to see where they compare with our national survey findings: What kind of library user are you?” (via Pew Research Center)

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Pennsylvania libraries feeling pressures of continued funding cuts

“Pennsylvania’s public libraries endured the pain of the funding ax in recent years, cutting back on staff, services, new book purchases and hours of operation. In Washington County, the situation is about to become more dire — one community’s library might have to close altogether. Citizens and Chartiers-Houston libraries, two Washington County libraries that rely on school districts for a portion of their funding, learned in recent weeks that the districts — Trinity Area and Chartiers-Houston — will eliminate their appropriations to the libraries due to budget constraints. The news comes in a year when the state public library subsidy, a portion of the education budget, has fallen to $53.5 million from $75.1 million in 2008-09.” (via Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

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New York Public Library Looks at Innovative Models for Renovation

“The New York Public Library is looking south for inspiration as it goes back to the drawing board for a planned renovation of its landmark Fifth Avenue building and the branch across the street. Library officials say they are considering two innovative libraries in Tennessee and North Carolina as models for creating high-tech, collaborative spaces. Chattanooga Public Library’s “4th Floor” is a so-called maker space stocked with 3-D printers and even a loom. North Carolina State University’s James B. Hunt Jr. Library in Raleigh features writable surfaces on walls and tables, and massive video screens for displaying data.” (via WSJ)

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OCLC and Elsevier to offer automated seamless access to subscribed e-content

“OCLC and Elsevier, a leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, are working together to automate the process to keep e-book and e-journal holdings from ScienceDirect, Elsevier’s full-text platform for research literature, up-to-date in WorldCat and library catalogs. The automated process ensures seamless access to subscribed content without intervention from library staff.” (via OCLC)

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Librarians are becoming affordable housing advocates. Yes, you read that right

“A new group is joining the push for more affordable housing: city libraries. Yes, it’s true. Public libraries, in the District and around the country, have long been considered “day shelters” where the homeless hang out until the shelter’s open at night, said Robin Diener, president of the Friends of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, near Gallery Place in downtown D.C.As the city experienced an unprecedented spike in homelessness this winter, libraries have been seeing more homeless residents use their facilities. The group is proud that homeless residents would take advantage of the library system, a place Diener called a “sanctuary for the mind.” But is also comes with challenges, particularly when homeless residents use the bathrooms to shave, groom or, in some case, do drugs. So the city’s homeless crisis, due primarily because of the city’s loss of low-income housing, has become an issue for the city’s library system.” (via The Washington Post)

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Gale Brings Millions of Pages of Treasured Historical Content to Academic Libraries

“Gale, part of Cengage Learning, has added millions of pages of content to its Gale Digital Collections program with the launch of 10 resources, including new periodical collections and the next installments of Smithsonian Collections Online, Nineteenth Century Collections Online, and The Chatham House Online Archive. Researchers now have access to digitized versions of venerated materials such as recordings and transcripts of speeches from Winston Churchill and Henry Kissinger, and photos and exhibition catalogs of World’s Fairs, among others. These collections will be available on the Gale Artemis: Primary Sources platform, giving researchers access to graphing and search visualization tools that will help them explore this historical content in new ways.” (via Cengage Learning)

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