KU Libraries places ‘radical’ political literature online

“The American political landscape of 50 years ago was full of radical movements and ideology, from violent opposition to the Vietnam War to lesser-known ideas about the supposed danger of fluoridating water. It was also when the University of Kansas Libraries purchased the collection of a young student chronicling activities of different political movements across the ideological spectrum. KU is marking the 50th anniversary of the Wilcox Collection of Contemporary Political Movements, one of the world’s premier collections of political ephemera and literature, with an online exhibition…” (via CJOnline.com)

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Oxford’s New Bodleian Library has had a radical modernist makeover

“Unloved, dingy, almost prison-like. Oxford’s New Bodleian Library has always been an oddball among the university’s architectural treasures – a bland lump on the corner of Broad Street and Parks Road. Inside, the 11 levels of book stacks constipated the core of the library, and gave it a leaden atmosphere. But when it reopens on 21 March as the Weston Library, it will be a hey presto moment for the city. The building has been transformed, and will become a magnet for pathological swots, local café society and legions of tourists.” (via The Independent)

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Marin, other libraries bouncing back after recession

“When was the last time you passed by a public library and saw that it was closed? The recession made that a common sight but now, libraries are starting to bounce back. “When I went to a library when I was young, it was just books and that’s how I thought of libraries as just books,” Marin City Library Webstars Coordinator Etienne Douglas said. So what in the world is a 3D printer doing at the library.” (via abc7news.com)

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Napa: Wine library pairs bookworms, history buffs

“It turns out one of Napa Valley’s best places to learn about wine doesn’t even require a glass. The Napa Valley Wine Library, which is housed at St. Helena’s public library, maintains one of the country’s most comprehensive collections of writing about wine. Since being organized in 1962, it has acquired 3,500 books, as well as periodicals, newsletters and oral histories from three decades starting in the 1960s — the golden era of Napa’s development. Perhaps you want to find, say, Morton Shand’s “A Book of French Wines” from 1960 or Sunset’s “California Wine” pictorial from 1973 — a perfect snapshot of the era’s industry — or Lindley Bynum’s “California Wines: How to Enjoy Them” from 1955. (Perhaps the answer was less self-evident back then?) They are all readily available.” (via SFGate)

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UC Press, California Digital Library receive grant to improve publication system

“University of California Press and the California Digital Library, or CDL, received a grant of $750,000 earlier this month to develop a Web-based workflow-management system that would improve the publication process of open-access monographs. The two-year grant — awarded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which supports works in the arts and humanities — is intended to promote the publication of social science monographs, which are detailed written studies of specific subject areas. UC Press and the CDL are developing the system to help decrease the costs and increase the efficiency of the academic publication process.” (via DailyCal.org)

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Alameda County: Librarian connects incarcerated youths to lesser-known writers

Literacy can save a life — or at least define one. Manifested in the personal and professional life of librarian and advocate Amy Cheney, the idea comes to full fruition for the incarcerated youths at the Alameda County Juvenile Justice Center. Cheney’s “Write to Read” program brings library services and materials to underserved youth. The 54-year-old Oakland resident has won the “I Love My Librarian” award from the Carnegie Institution and The New York Times and was honored at the White House with a National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award.” (via Inside Bay Area)

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Library officials met with blunt questions, cautious support at Brooklyn Heights meeting

“Brooklyn Public Library officials and developers were upbeat at a Monday night meeting that provided some new details on the plan to sell and develop the Brooklyn Heights library branch. A number of local residents expressed scathing criticism of the plan, however, and urged the library and its Community Advisory Committee (CAC) to consider the impact of yet another residential tower on Brooklyn Heights’ already-overcrowded elementary school, P.S. 8.” (via Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

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COLLEGE ‘REDISCOVERS’ COLLECTION OF RARE GREEK, ROMAN COINS

“A priceless cache of ancient Greek and Roman coins that had become a kind of buried treasure has been “rediscovered” at the University at Buffalo, which had paid little attention to the coins since they were donated in 1935. The collection of 55 gold and silver coins date as far back as the fifth century B.C. Among them are a dozen gold coins from Rome – one each from the eras of Julius Caesar and the 11 emperors who followed him.” (via The Associated Press)

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Clean Reader app removes profanity from e-books

“An app that lets users choose how much profanity they want to let into their reading experience has acquired users in 70 countries, and plenty of reactions along the way. With Clean Reader, users have the choice of how they wish the text of their books to display — Clean (no F-words or the like), Cleaner, Squeaky Clean, or Off, to see it in its original form. Words in question are replaced by a blue dot that can be tapped to view a suggested substitution.” (via Canoe)

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Groundbreaking research in schools and workplaces will marry information competencies with citizenship and employability

“The Information Literacy Group of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) have announced the funding of two contemporary research projects examining how good information skills, or information literacy, can help develop participation in democracy among schoolchildren and enhance employability and performance among the workforce. Dr Geoff Walton, Lecturer in Information Sciences at Northumbria University and CILIP Information Literacy Group Committee member said: “These projects will bring tangible evidence of the social and economic opportunities of properly understanding and embedding information literacy, demonstrating the practices and competencies that work to support individual participation in society and employability in the digital age.” (via CILIP)

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