Boy writes apology to library for damaging book while falling asleep reading

“A young reader looking to atone for tearing a borrowed comic book has won over Toronto library staff – and many others online – with a handwritten apology note. The note, addressed to “Library” and signed by “Jackson,” explains in large blue writing that a page accidentally ripped after the book fell from the bunk where the child had fallen asleep reading. The boy then writes that he’s sorry and swears “it won’t happen again.” (via Global News)

Leave a Comment

The Rise of Phone Reading

“Last fall, Andrew Vestal found himself rocking his baby daughter, Ada, back to sleep every morning between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m. Cradling Ada in the crook of his arm, he discovered he could read his dimly-lit phone with one hand. That’s how he read David Mitchell’s 624-page science-fiction saga “The Bone Clocks.” Mr. Vestal’s iPhone has offered him a way to squeeze in time for reading that he otherwise might have given up. He reads on lunch breaks. He even reads between meetings as he walks across Microsoft’s Seattle campus, where he works as a program manager.” (via WSJ)

Leave a Comment

The stuff of D.C. punk history becomes part of the public record

“All the stuff Mark Andersen saved — the fliers, the zines, the set lists, the photos, the audio cassettes and videotapes — he saved simply because he thought it was worth saving. Mark said: “That’s the essence of the punk approach. If you feel like something should be done, do it.” (via Washington Post)

Leave a Comment

UW builds largest digital library of Sephardic language

“Fast becoming a Sephardic guru, a University of Washington professor is building the world’s first digital library of books, letters and other materials in the centuries-old language of Ladino, with materials donated from Seattle’s large Sephardic Jewish community.” (via Seattle Times)

Leave a Comment

Chairman quits after Arizona genealogy library’s changes

“There goes the researcher vote … The changes at the state Library, Archives and Public Records division are not going down well with the research community. After Secretary of State Michele Reagan, who oversees the division, announced “digital is our world,” a member of the state Library Advisory Board resigned. Then came four layoffs and the abrupt downsizing and move of the state genealogy collection. For Catherine May, who was the board’s first chairman, it was too much. “I just don’t want my name tied to Secretary Reagan,” May said. “I don’t trust what they’ve done.” (via Arizona Republic)

Leave a Comment

The future of the MLS: New report from the University of Maryland

“Last summer, the iSchool at the University of Maryland launched the Re-Envisioning the MLS initiative. The premise is that future professionals in library and library-related fields will likely need fundamentally different educational preparation than what is provided by current curricula. Based on an extensive body of research, outreach, and analysis, yesterday the iSchool released its report Re-Envisioning the MLS: Findings, Issues, and Considerations.” (via Direct Dispatch)

Leave a Comment

Obscure and popular books part of Berkeley library weeding process

“When librarians from the Berkeley Public Library were examining books that had not been checked out for three years to determine which ones to keep and which to discard, they reviewed “The Housefly: Its Natural History, Medical Importance, and Control,” written by Luther S. West in 1951. It was retained. So was “A Guide to Shrubs for Coastal California,” by Harry Morton Butterfield, published in 1980, and the memoir “The Peacocks of Baboquivari,” by Erma J. Fisk, which came out in 1987. But the librarians agreed that Yingxing Song’s “Chinese Technology in the Seventeenth Century,” described by its publisher as a “1637 classic on the history of traditional Chinese technology,” didn’t need to remain in circulation. Neither did “Creating Color: a Dyer’s Handbook,” by Judy Anne Walter or “Strip City: A Stripper’s Farewell Journey across America,” by Lily Burana.” (via Berkeley Side)

Leave a Comment

University of Michigan reopens medical library without books

“The University of Michigan has reopened its Taubman Health Sciences Library after a $55 million overhaul and rethinking of how a library for medical students should function. Hundreds of thousands of books were moved to an offsite location and are available on demand for delivery, and by becoming “bookless” the school said that frees up space for medical student education. The facility on the school’s Ann Arbor campus officially reopened over the weekend. “Today’s library can be anywhere, thanks to technology, yet there is still a desire for a physical location that facilitates collaboration, study and learning,” Jane Blumenthal, associate university librarian and Taubman Library director, said in a statement.” (via AP)

Leave a Comment

As Islamic State group threatens its history, Iraq moves to digitize its national library

“The dimly lit, dust-caked stacks of the Baghdad National Library hide a treasure of the ages: crinkled, yellowing papers holding the true stories of sultans and kings; imperialists and socialists; occupation and liberation; war and peace. These are the original chronicles of Iraq’s rich and tumultuous history — and now librarians and academics in Baghdad are working feverishly to preserve what’s left after thousands of documents were lost or damaged at the height of the U.S.-led invasion.” (via AP)

Leave a Comment

Borough Aid to Queens Library Is Restored

“The Queens borough president has allocated $14 million to the Queens Library for capital improvements, her office announced on Monday, a year after she withheld such funds after an investigation into the financial misconduct of the library’s former president. The allocation, for the 2016 fiscal year, will be distributed to 12 branches out of the system’s 62 locations. It will go toward renovation projects at the Baisley Park branch, estimated to cost $3.5 million, the St. Albans branch, which will cost $2.2 million, and the Arvene branch, expected to cost $3.8 million.” (via NY Times)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2015, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.