Bibliophiles Attack Condo Plan for Brooklyn Heights Library

“An epic hearing over a contentious plan to replace the Brooklyn Heights Library with a new, smaller one at the foot of a wedge-shaped 36-story condo building was, in the end, anti-climactic. After hours of testimony from both sides, Brooklyn Community Board 2 postponed a vote on an application involving the sale of the library property to developer Hudson Companies.” (via Curbed)

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Elsevier Collaborates With Ex Libris to Offer Automated Updates to Subscribed e-Content

“Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical, and medical information products and services, today announced an expanded collaboration with Ex Libris, a global leader in library automation services. The collaboration will enable mutual customers of Elsevier’s ScienceDirect and the Ex Libris Alma® library management solution and SFX® OpenURL link resolver, to benefit from a fully automated workflow that will keep the library full text access levels up to date for both journals and books.” (via PR Newswire)

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Congressional Research Belongs to the Public

“In Washington, the reports have become commodities traded and sold by policy wonks. Every day, the Congressional Research Service, a little-known government agency attached to the Library of Congress, churns out papers on issues as varied as the defense budget, the farm bill and nuclear weapons. They’re not classified. They’re nonpartisan. And unlike many government reports, they’re fairly easy to understand. Yet it’s hard for most people to get copies of reports produced by the Congressional Research Service, which operates as an in-house think-tank for lawmakers. That is absurd. (via NYT)

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Moving Wikipedia From Computer to Many, Many Bookshelves

The Wikipedia entry for “quixoticism” runs only about 255 words. But if anyone could argue for a personal mention, it might be Michael Mandiberg. For the past three years, he has been fully engaged in a project that might make even the most intrepid digital adventurer blush: transforming the English-language Wikipedia into an old-fashioned print reference set running to 7,600 volumes.” (via NYT)

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The Web Will Either Kill Science Journals or Save Them

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH IS awesome—we read it, we build upon it, we innovate with it, and we love it. But the process of getting research from the scientists who spend months or years with their data to the academics who want to read it can be messy. It takes a long time. It’s expensive. And the researchers involved give their work away for free—as do the peer-reviewers who approve it. Many researchers have long believed publishing power has evolved to lie in the hands of a few big companies, like, say, Reed-Elsevier and Springer. But none had ever done a study to see if that was true.” (via Wired)

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Academic publishers reap huge profits as libraries go broke

“Think it’s hard to make money in publishing in the digital age? Well, huge profits are still to be had – if you’re a publisher of academic research journals. While traditional book and magazine publishers struggle to stay afloat, research publishing houses have typical profit margins of nearly 40 per cent, says Vincent Larivière, a researcher at the University of Montreal’s School of Library and Information Science.” (via CBC)

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Girl, 12, gets officials to change Sioux Falls library hours

A 12-year-old Sioux Falls girl has helped convince the city’s library system to open its doors on Sundays during the summer. Rachida Mahamed went to the downtown library on a Sunday a year ago and found it wasn’t open. At the time, Siouxland Libraries were closed on Sunday from Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day weekend. In the parking lot that day, Rachida met Cathy Brechtelsbauer, who also didn’t realize the library was closed. She encouraged Rachida to voice her thoughts on library hours at the City Council meeting the next week, so she went and proposed a change.” (via Rapid City Journal)

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Many Choices for Obama in Replacing Billington at Library of Congress

“Only 10 presidents have had the opportunity to nominate a librarian of Congress to oversee America’s largest trove of intellectual treasures and to serve as the chief of the sprawling research institution for the nation’s lawmakers. And after President Obama replaces James H. Billington, who has held the job for 28 years, it may be a generation before it happens again.” (via NYT)

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How Hosting an Edit-A-Thon Made Me Trust Wikipedia

“The academic community has been wary of Wikipedia since it first came on the scene. Teachers have spent a decade warning their students not trust the online encyclopedia, concerned that because anyone can edit it, it might not be reliable. I’ll admit I first approached Wikipedia with caution, using it for quick reference but steering clear when conducting any serious research. But on Monday, at the first ever ocean edit-a-thon – sponsored by the Waitt Institute, Smithsonian Ocean Portal, and Wikimedia Foundation – my distrust dissolved.” (via National Geographic)

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ALA president calls for digital transformation of Copyright Office

“Today, American Library Association (ALA) president Courtney Young responded to the introduction of the Copyright Office for the Digital Economy Act (CODE Act) by Representatives Judy Chu (D-CA) and Tom Marino (R-PA): “For more than 20 years, content creators, rights holders, legislators and public users alike have acknowledged that the U.S. Copyright Office needs to modernize its technological capabilities for the 21st century. Unfortunately, the recently introduced Copyright Office for the Digital Economy Act does little to address significant technology challenges impacting the U.S. Copyright Office. (via ALA)

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