OverDrive Announces Agreement for Acquisition by Rakuten

“OverDrive, Inc., the leading eBook, audiobook and streaming video platform for libraries and schools, today announced it entered into an agreement to be acquired by Rakuten Inc., one of the world’s largest Internet services companies.  Insight Venture Partners has been the majority shareholder of OverDrive since 2010.  OverDrive (www.overdrive.com) will operate as a subsidiary of Rakuten USA and will work closely with other Rakuten companies.” (via OverDrive)

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Kansas City, Mo., teens rally to restore funding for public libraries

“More than 100 teenagers from across Kansas City traveled Wednesday to Jefferson City, Mo., for a rally to keep their public libraries open. The teens want Governor Jay Nixon to restore $6 million in funding for public libraries across the state. They plan to meet with legislators to explain the importance of libraries and rally on the steps of the capital.” (via KSHB.com)

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Someone Keeps Photocopying Their Cat at the University of Wisconsin Library

“College campuses are full of mysteries, and there’s a major one developing right now at the University of Wisconsin. Somebody has allegedly been using one of the campus libraries to photocopy a cat. But so far, nobody knows who is doing this. A staffer at the university’s Badger Herald newspaper stumbled upon the following photo while studying at the Steenbock Library Tuesday:” (via TIME)

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How Do Latinos Use, Rate Public Libraries? New Study

“Immigrant Hispanics are less likely than US-born Latinos and other Americans to have ever been to a public library, but when they do, foreign-born Latinos rate library services higher than other groups, according to a new Pew Research Center Hispanic Trends report.About seven-in-ten Latinos ages 16 and older say they have visited a public library or bookmobile at least once in their lifetime, less than their Black counterparts at 80 percent and Whites at 83 percent.” (via NBC News.com)

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You have to see these libraries. (But shh—people are reading.)

“Libraries on beaches or sidewalks, libraries on the move—whether by elephant in Laos or boat in Minnesota or a tank-like vehicle in Buenos Aires known as the “Weapon of Mass Instruction”—their books offered to all on a take-one, leave-one honour system: It may yet turn out, as Nietzsche might have put it, that what doesn’t kill libraries will end up making them stronger. Or merely flat-out cool. The growth and proliferation of libraries has always been tightly tied to the (economic) devaluation of books. In the Middle Ages, when it took months of monastic labour and the lives—and skins—of an entire flock of sheep to make one unique book, libraries chained their treasures in place and occasionally wrote toe-curling curses within them aimed at any would-be thief: “Whoever steals this book, let him die the death; let be him be frizzled in a pan; may the falling sickness rage within him; may he be broken on the wheel and be hanged.” (via Macleans.ca)

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‘HEATHER HAS TWO MOMMIES’ REVISED, UPDATED

“A playful picture book about a little girl named Heather and her two happy mommies was a cultural and legal flashpoint 25 years ago, angering conservatives over the morality of same-sex parenting and landing libraries at the center of community battles over placement in the children’s stacks. Today, Heather – of “Heather Has Two Mommies” – has a lot more company in books for young kids about different kinds of families, but hers was out of print and seemed visually dated. That’s why creator Leslea Newman decided on a new version, updating the look of her watershed story with fresh illustrations from a new artist and tweaking the text to streamline.” (via The Associated Press)

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KU Libraries places ‘radical’ political literature online

“The American political landscape of 50 years ago was full of radical movements and ideology, from violent opposition to the Vietnam War to lesser-known ideas about the supposed danger of fluoridating water. It was also when the University of Kansas Libraries purchased the collection of a young student chronicling activities of different political movements across the ideological spectrum. KU is marking the 50th anniversary of the Wilcox Collection of Contemporary Political Movements, one of the world’s premier collections of political ephemera and literature, with an online exhibition…” (via CJOnline.com)

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Oxford’s New Bodleian Library has had a radical modernist makeover

“Unloved, dingy, almost prison-like. Oxford’s New Bodleian Library has always been an oddball among the university’s architectural treasures – a bland lump on the corner of Broad Street and Parks Road. Inside, the 11 levels of book stacks constipated the core of the library, and gave it a leaden atmosphere. But when it reopens on 21 March as the Weston Library, it will be a hey presto moment for the city. The building has been transformed, and will become a magnet for pathological swots, local café society and legions of tourists.” (via The Independent)

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Marin, other libraries bouncing back after recession

“When was the last time you passed by a public library and saw that it was closed? The recession made that a common sight but now, libraries are starting to bounce back. “When I went to a library when I was young, it was just books and that’s how I thought of libraries as just books,” Marin City Library Webstars Coordinator Etienne Douglas said. So what in the world is a 3D printer doing at the library.” (via abc7news.com)

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Napa: Wine library pairs bookworms, history buffs

“It turns out one of Napa Valley’s best places to learn about wine doesn’t even require a glass. The Napa Valley Wine Library, which is housed at St. Helena’s public library, maintains one of the country’s most comprehensive collections of writing about wine. Since being organized in 1962, it has acquired 3,500 books, as well as periodicals, newsletters and oral histories from three decades starting in the 1960s — the golden era of Napa’s development. Perhaps you want to find, say, Morton Shand’s “A Book of French Wines” from 1960 or Sunset’s “California Wine” pictorial from 1973 — a perfect snapshot of the era’s industry — or Lindley Bynum’s “California Wines: How to Enjoy Them” from 1955. (Perhaps the answer was less self-evident back then?) They are all readily available.” (via SFGate)

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