Manuscripts, other documents by author Toni Morrison added to Princeton’s library collection

“The papers of Nobel laureate Toni Morrison are now part of the permanent library collection of Princeton University. Princeton made the announcement Friday, shortly before the 83-year-old Morrison took part in a forum at the school where she served on the faculty for 17 years.” (via AP)

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EBSCO Information Services Opens Second Office and Hires Former Swets Employees in the United Kingdom

“EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) is opening a second office in the United Kingdom and has hired a number of former Swets employees to help customers transitioning to EBSCO as their subscription agent. EBSCO believes that this investment in infrastructure and staffing will provide libraries with the confidence to work with EBSCO during this critical renewals phase— and into the future. Since the news broke of difficulties at Swets several weeks ago, EBSCO’s office in the UK has been drawing-up plans to manage subscription portfolios for customers of Swets looking to make alternative arrangements. With the announcement last Friday that the Swets’ staff in Abingdon have now been made redundant, many customers will be looking for a safe and financially secure partner for their journals.” (via EBSCO)

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IMLS Awards $1.3 Million for Training and Professional Development Projects

“The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) today announced grants and a cooperative agreement totaling $1,373,405 for three projects featuring training and professional development resources that will benefit library, museum, and archives professionals. “I am proud that IMLS is supporting these projects that strengthen collections care, increase access to cultural heritage materials, and provide leadership training for museum, library, and archive professionals,” said Susan H. Hildreth.” (via IMLS)

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A new D.C. online archive lets users sample photos, drawings, maps and more

“Though they both lived in Washington, it’s unlikely that Clifford Berryman and Joseph Owen Curtis ever met. Berryman was the Washington Evening Star’s political cartoonist. Curtis was an amateur photographer. One used a pen to tweak lawmakers, especially over the issue of voting rights for Washingtonians. The other used a camera to celebrate the people and places of his Southwest Washington neighborhood. Now the two nestle together digitally at Dig DC, a new online archive created by the D.C. Public Library’s Special Collections department.” (via The Washington Post)

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OCLC Research publishes preprint of “Collection Directions: The Evolution of Library Collections and Collecting”

“Written by Lorcan Dempsey, Constance Malpas, and Brian Lavoie, “Collection Directions: The Evolution of Library Collections and Collecting” [pdf] takes a broad view of the evolution of collecting behaviors in a network environment and suggests some future directions based on various simple models.” (via OCLC)

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New York Times Rolls Out Archive of Vintage Print Ads

“Vintage ads that appeared in The New York Times are getting their own digital archive that will live on the Times’ website. Called Madison in reference to Madison Avenue, the archive is expected to go live Tuesday and, at the onset, include every print ad from every edition of the Times in the 1960s. “It invites people to view an important part of our cultural history,” said Alexis Lloyd, creative director at The New York Times Research and Development Lab, which created Madison.

But the Times is inviting readers to do more than just view the ads. It’s also asking readers to help shape the archive by sifting through the ads, identifying them and even transcribing their text.” (via Advertising Age)

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D.C. public library system highlighted in Aspen Institute’s national report

“One of the District’s least highlighted gems is getting some national love. Tuesday, The Aspen Institute issued a report called “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries.” The document is the work of the institute’s Communications and Society Program, which put together the Dialogue on Public Libraries to study how the facilities can be better equipped to deal with a rapidly changing information world. As it turns out, the District is doing pretty well in that regard.” (via The Washington Post)

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EC reports on digitisation in Europe

“In early October the European Commission published two reports on the current state of digitisation of cultural heritage material in Europe: one report addresses progress in the area of digitisation and online accessibility of cultural material and digital preservation, while the other looks more specifically at the situation around European film heritage in the digital era. Both reports conclude that although more cultural content has been made available online in recent years, there is still a lot of work to be done.” (via OpenGLAM)

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Adobe responds to ALA on egregious data breach; some action expected by week of Oct. 20

“The American Library Association (ALA) decries confirmed reader data breaches by Adobe and calls for immediate corrective action to encrypt and protect reader information. The plain text transmission of reader data over the Internet that was first reported Oct. 7 presumably stretches back as far as the release of Adobe Digital Editions (ADE) 4.0 in early September. The ADE e-book reader application is used by thousands of libraries and many tens of thousands of e-book readers around the globe. “People expect and deserve that their reading activities remain private, and libraries closely guard the confidentiality of library users’ records,” said ALA President Courtney Young. “The unencrypted online transmission of library reader data is not only egregious, it sidesteps state laws around the country that protect the privacy of library reading records. Further, this affects more than library users; it is a gross privacy violation for ALL users of Adobe Digital Editions 4.” (via ALA)

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Wikipedia, a Professor’s Best Friend

“Michael Gorman, a former president of the American Library Association, wrote some years ago that “a professor who encourages the use of Wikipedia is the intellectual equivalent of a dietitian who recommends a steady diet of Big Macs with everything.” If that is true, I must be an intellectual fast-food vendor. I am a professor who not only recommends that my students use Wikipedia but also encourages them to edit and develop it. However, I am in the clear minority in academia. Most professors treat Wikipedia with suspicion and contempt, if not open hatred.” (via The Chronicle of Higher Education)

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