For Those in the Digital Dark, Enlightenment Is Borrowed From the Library

“Joey Cabrera stands for part of most evenings on the doorstep of the Clason’s Point Library, near 172nd Street and Morrison Avenue in the Bronx. There, he taps into the Wi-Fi that seeps out of the library after it closes. He checks in on Tumblr, Snapchat, Facebook — “the usual stuff,” he said — and plays Lost Saga, a video game developed in Korea. “Formerly, I played Minecraft, but this is less mainstream, an inside thing with my friends,” Joey said. Then there is a basic maneuver in skateboarding that he is mastering, the Pop Shove It. He studies the technique at the library doorstep.” (via NYTimes.com)

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Mayor Walsh Launches Innovative Mobile Reading Initiatives across Boston

“Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced the launch of the Boston Public Library’s Bibliocycle, and the re-launch of ReadBoston’s Storymobile, now in its nineteenth year. Both programs use a human-powered bicycle with an attached trailer to make their services mobile, and will be pedaling through Boston’s neighborhoods this summer.” (via BPL)

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‘Little Free Libraries’ legal in Leawood thanks to 9-year-old Spencer Collins

“Nine-year-old Spencer Collins will be able put his “Little Free Library” back in his front yard first thing in the morning. The Leawood City Council unanimously approved a temporary moratorium Monday night that exempts the little lending libraries from a city ordinance that prohibits structures in front yards. The moratorium, effective Tuesday, will last until Oct. 20. As soon as the moratorium passed, Mayor Peggy Dunn called Spencer to the front of the room to hand him a book for his library, an action that received applause from the audience.” (via The Kansas City Star)

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The power of librarians

Marcel Fortin is a man in demand. Fortin, the geographic information systems (GIS) and map librarian at Robarts Map and Data Library, is a master at mapping spatial data, the geographic dimension of information. The popularity of this discipline has skyrocketed during the last 10 years, especially with the advent of Google Maps and Google Earth, he says. “Spatial data means thinking about things in relation to geography. People often haven’t done that before,” says Fortin. “It’s applying spatial patterns to stories and research.”

If you want to see where the 10 best hamburger joints in Toronto are, for example, a map gives you a better understanding than a list. Ditto for the epicentres of the world’s 10 most recent earthquakes or the poorest neighbourhoods in Canada.” (via UToronto)

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The big city library as Internet provider

“As our Brian Fung detailed last week, some of the United States’ bigger urban library systems have begun lodging a public protest against the formula federal rulemakers are considering for the distribution of billions of dollars for wireless Internet infrastructure. The Federal Communications Commission is thinking of divvying up so-called E-Rate funds to libraries based on square footage rather than users or some other metric, a calculation that city libraries argue gives an unfair advantage to their more sprawling suburban counterparts. And now perhaps the biggest name in the U.S. public libraries has dipped into the debate.” (via The Washington Post)

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Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum Houses Sport’s Greatest Collection of Books and Magazines

“It is fitting that the quietest place at Wimbledon is the library. “It’s an oasis,” said Audrey Snell, who has worked there for 15 years. About 40,000 fans crowd onto the grounds of the All England Lawn Tennis Club each day during the tournament, filling Centre Court, smothering Henman Hill and shuffling among matches, sipping Pimm’s and nibbling strawberries. Only a few each day find their way to the library, with the sport’s greatest collection of books and magazines.” (via NYT)

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Big Ten Libraries: Borrowing from the Best

“When Shakiela Morton started researching the lack of STEM preparation for African-American girls in urban schools, she found nearly two-dozen articles in the Rutgers libraries, but none of the books she needed to add weight to her independent project. Then she clicked on a link on the university library’s website for UBorrow – a service provided by the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), the consortium that Rutgers joined in July 2013. She discovered she could search through the collections of Big Ten school libraries and found four books on black women in science, technology, engineering and math to boost her research. “It was great because it gave me more access to a bigger pool of data to support my research,’’ said Morton, a student in the School of Communication and Information and a member of Douglass Residential College. At some point she wants to have her work published. “I want people to see that it wasn’t based on just personal experience, but on studies and research from others who are interested in this topic,’’ she said.” (via Rutgers)

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News stories ‘forgotten’ from Google searches

“British news outlets are having their stories removed from European Google searches under the continent’s “right to be forgotten.” The Guardian, BBC and the Daily Mail have reported that their stories are being deleted from searches within Europe, which writers worried would be a threat to journalism. At the BBC, economics journalist Robert Peston wrote that he received a notification from Google on Wednesday that the Internet giant is “no longer able to show” Europeans a link to a 2007 blog post to. The post was about a former head of investment bank Merrill Lynch who was forced out after the bank suffered “colossal losses” on some of its investments.” (via TheHill)

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Building a collection of financial education materials for a library near you

“We want to make libraries the go-to place for financial information in every community. And so far, we’ve been met with tremendous enthusiasm – from other government and nonprofit agencies, by library associations and administrators, and by librarians themselves. That’s why we’ve put together resources and materials for libraries to use in their community. We started this project about a year ago by listening to a group of nine librarians who agreed to work with us. After we announced the initiative in April, the number of libraries that wanted to participate swelled to nearly 50 library systems. Last week, we announced a partnership with Rhode Island’s Office of Library and Information Services, our first partnership with a state-wide impact, increasing our reach to more than 100 library systems. More importantly, these 100 systems have more than 450 branch locations that receive more than 76 million visits a year.” (via CFBP)

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2014 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition—thousands of engaged attendees, lively programs and events

“18,626 librarians, library workers and library supporters (including 5,607 exhibitors) from around the world joined energetically in the shared endeavor of “Transforming our libraries, ourselves” at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition, June 26-July 1 in Las Vegas. Attendees took part in spirited and productive conversations, sessions, problem-solving, events, discovery of the latest products and services and networking throughout the Las Vegas Convention Center and other venues. The program included more than 2,700 scheduled programs, sessions and events.” (via ALA)

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