Internet Archive and CADAL Partner to Digitize 500,000 Academic Texts

“The Internet Archive and the Chinese Academic Digital Associative Library (CADAL), are pleased to announce that 500,000 English-language, academic books will be digitized through a partnership that leverages strengths from both organizations. This furthers an initiative begun in 2009, The China-US Million Book Digital Library Project, seeking to bring one million texts into the public domain. “We are working together with a valuable global partner, CADAL, to create a digital library of high quality, academic, eBooks for use in China, North America and the world at large; I couldn’t be happier!” Robert Miller, General Manager of Digital Libraries for the Internet Archive, remarked on the collaboration.” (via Internet Archive)

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Declines in state aid to Kansas libraries has forced budgeting changes

“State aid to Kansas libraries dropped 23 percent in the past fiscal year, according to a new report — part of a years-long decline that has caused the Topeka and Shawnee County Library to change the way it budgets. The Kansas Center for Economic Growth said Tuesday state funds to libraries fell approximately 23 percent between fiscal year 2013 and fiscal year 2014 when dollar amounts were adjusted for inflation.” (via CJOnline.com)

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Library of Congress: the Unexpected Diplomat

“One doesn’t typically expect terrorism to become a topic of discussion at hearing about library funding. But that’s exactly what happened on March 17, as the Senate Legislative Branch Appropriations Subcommittee assessed the budget requests of the Library of Congress and the Architect of the Capitol. “You’re the world’s resource and we’ve been reading the news reports of ISIS members destroying artifacts of ancient civilizations,” the panel’s chairwoman, Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, said to Librarian of Congress James H. Billington, teeing up a question about a little-known aspect of the Library of Congress.” (via Roll Call)

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No-sleeping rule at public libraries unwelcome change for Edmonton’s homeless

“Darren Richards describes the Stanley A. Milner Library as a quiet, safe haven. Richards has been homeless for four years and uses the downtown library daily, as a place to read, charge his cellphone and nap. That will change May 1, when the Edmonton Public Library implements a no-sleeping policy at all its branches. Louise Reimer, director of branch services, said the rule is necessary because the central library has become a “de-facto day shelter.” (via Edmonton Journal)

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CheckItOut – Taylor Swift Parody Video for National Library Week

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LexisNexis Launches LexisNexis Newsdesk

“LexisNexis® Legal & Professional, a leading provider of content and technology solutions, today announced the launch of LexisNexis® Newsdesk, a comprehensive media aggregation, monitoring and analytics solution enabling business, legal and information professionals to confidently find, analyze and share key insights about the company, industry and competitive environment of their business or client. LexisNexis Newsdesk comes to market as a result of the LexisNexis acquisition of Moreover Technologies last year. Since that transaction, LexisNexis has integrated its leading collection of licensed news and business information with the deep selection of news, open Web content, and analytical and distribution features from the Moreover Newsdesk solution. These resources are now delivered seamlessly through a single, easy-to-use interface that helps users quickly discover, review and disseminate vital information.” (via LexisNexis)

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New State of America’s Libraries Report finds shift in role of U.S. libraries

“According to The State of America’s Libraries Report released today by the American Library Association (ALA), academic, public and school libraries are experiencing a shift in how they are perceived by their communities and society. No longer just places for books, libraries of all types are viewed as anchors, centers for academic life and research and cherished spaces. This and other library trends of the past year are detailed in the ALA’s 2015 State of America’s Libraries Report, which became available during National Library Week, April 12 – 18.” (via ALA)

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US library group: Here are the 10 books receiving most complaints, most likely to be censored

“It turns out at least one part of publishing has a diverse slate of authors: The books most likely to be pulled from school and library shelves. The American Library Association on Monday released its annual list of the 10 books receiving the most complaints from parents, educators and others in the local community. Sherman Alexie’s prize-winning, autobiographical novel of school life, “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian,” ranked No. 1, followed by Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel “Persepolis” and the picture book about two male penguins raising a baby penguin, Peter Parnell’s and Justin Richardson’s “And Tango Makes Three.” (via AP)

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Hoping to raise interest in books, public library opens school branch

“The kindergarten students sat in rows on a rainbow-colored carpet and listened to a story during a visit to their new school library. Then they did a reading cheer — “Read, Baby, Read!” — before they got to go “shopping” for books. Within a few minutes, the children at D.C. Prep Benning Public Charter School were lined up clutching books about Hot Wheels, princesses, pandas, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Curious George, Superman, and Pete the Cat, to name a few. The students usually select books in their classrooms, going through shelves or bins that are organized by reading level. But the Ward 7 school added 5,000 new books in March by opening a D.C. Public Library branch inside the school.” (via The Washington Post)

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Little Free Libraries popping up worldwide

“Since Liz Siegel and Greg Jacobs live two blocks from the Sulzer Regional Library in Lincoln Square, logic would dictate that there really is no need for their sidewalk kiosk stocked with free books for anyone. But there is. The couple is part of the Little Free Library movement, a grass-roots wave of people around the world who are dedicating time and money to maintaining a free-standing book exchange on their front lawns, all in the name of literacy and community building. “I love the conversations with strangers it sparked,” says Siegel, 46, a curator at the Art Institute of Chicago. She, her husband and two daughters will often sit on their porch and talk to strangers about the books they might leaf through. They’ve met neighbors they had never met in their many years living in Lincoln Square.” (via Chicago Tribune)

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