ALEC BALDWIN HELPS RHODE ISLAND LIBRARY – AGAIN

“A struggling public library in Rhode Island is getting help from actor Alec Baldwin – again. Officials at the Adams Memorial Library in Central Falls say Baldwin will headline a fundraiser June 7 at Fete in Providence. Attendees can enter a raffle for a chance to read dialogue on stage with Baldwin.” (via The Associated Press)

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Children Who Visit Museums Have Higher Achievement in Reading, Math, and Science

“Earlier this month I had the honor of representing IMLS in Philadelphia at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Researchers, policymakers, and practitioners gathered to share cutting-edge research that will shape the future of education. The theme of the meeting was The Power of Education Research for Innovation in Practice and Policy. At the meeting, I presented some of the research we have been working on examining the influence of libraries and museums on early learning. This analysis provides insight into the differences between children who visit museums and those who don’t, including academic achievement.” (via UpNext: The IMLS Blog)

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Libraries Seek High-Speed Broadband

“The federal E-Rate program has been a boon for schools and public libraries across the country, helping them acquire Internet access and telecommunications products at affordable or vastly discounted rates. But the sleek new computers, laptops and tablets do not mean much without high-quality broadband service to match. At a public hearing on Thursday held by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the group said there was an urgent need to equip libraries with high-speed access to information. Without it, they say, the nation’s “opportunity gap” is growing.” (via NYTimes.com)

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Digital Public Library of America Celebrates Its First Birthday with the Arrival of Six New Partners, Over 7 Million Items, and a Growing Community

“This week marks the one-year anniversary of the launch of the Digital Public Library of America (http://dp.la), a groundbreaking all-digital library that brings together millions of items from America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world. In celebration, DPLA is proud to announce the addition of six major new partners and other significant milestones that attest to the tremendous momentum the project has as it enters its second year. The New York Public Library (NYPL) this week expanded access to the full breadth of its digital collections through its partnership with DPLA, a major increase over its initial contribution of 14,000 records at DPLA’s launch. Over 1 million digitized items from throughout the Library’s research holdings are available, significantly increasing DPLA’s offerings by nearly 20%.” (via Digital Public Library of America)

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SF library officials propose new rules to crack down on unruly behavior

“In response to Mayor Ed Lee’s call for zero tolerance for inappropriate behavior at the San Francisco Main Library, new rules are being added to the patron conduct code as well as stiffer suspensions for violating existing regulations that in some cases would ban offenders for up to three years. The proposed rules presented Thursday to the Library Commission were received favorably by the mayor-appointed board, but homeless advocates are critical of the increased penalties and rules they worry would unfairly target the poor and homeless (via San Francisco Examiner)

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Lawsuit Questions NYPL Overhaul

“A group of scholars has filed a third lawsuit aiming to block the New York Public Library’s controversial renovation, this time alleging that former Mayor Michael Bloomberg mishandled the city’s environmental review of the project. The lawsuit, filed Wednesday in New York State Supreme Court in Manhattan, criticizes Mr. Bloomberg for issuing a decision on the project’s environmental impact on Dec. 17—the same day the library submitted the final draft of its application.” (via WSJ.com)

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Elsevier Takedown Notices: A Q&A with Peter Suber

“In November 2013, Harvard received 23 takedown notices from Elsevier, a publisher of academic journals. A takedown notice is a request from a copyright holder to remove a work from the internet because of alleged copyright infringement. To comply with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), internet hosts like Harvard must comply with takedown notices even if the recipient may choose to put the work back up again. All 23 of the takedown notices targeted published editions of articles from Elsevier journals posted to websites on the Harvard.edu domain, including for example lab sites, faculty sites, and course websites hosted on iSites. All 23 articles were promptly taken down. None of the takedowns targeted articles in DASH (Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard), the open-access repository maintained by Harvard’s Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC). As Sarah Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library, put it, “The OSC is part of the solution, not part of the problem.” (via Harvard Library Portal)

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Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awards $194,000 grant for Chicago Collections Consortium online portal

“The University of Chicago Library is pleased to announce its participation in an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded project to support the development and implementation of the Chicago Portal. The $194,000 grant was awarded to the University of Illinois Board of Trustees on behalf of the Library, which is leading the project with the Chicago Collections Consortium (CCC). The University of Chicago is a member of the CCC. The fifteen-month grant will fund the development of CCC’s major first initiative, a freely accessible, online portal to materials documenting the rich history of Chicago. The portal paves the way for CCC to fulfill its vision of connecting and preserving Chicago-focused collections, and increasing public and scholarly interest in and study of the Chicago region’s diverse history and culture.” (via The University of Chicago Library News)

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Unlimited access to 33,000 video resources now available to UK educators

“Alexander Street Press has forged an agreement with Jisc to provide access to video resources for colleges and universities in the UK using the publisher’s popular evidence-based acquisition (EBA) model. The EBA agreement gives colleges and universities in the UK the opportunity to have unlimited access to Alexander Street Press’ complete suite of academic video titles - more than 33,000 titles - for up to one year at a time. At the end of this period, university staff can use Alexander Street Press’ detailed metrics to evaluate their patrons’ most-viewed titles and select those they’d like to incorporate into their permanent collection.” (via Jisc)

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New Data: More than 90% of U.S. Public Libraries Have Used E-rate

“With more than $36 billion dollars of discounts provided to date, the Universal Service Schools and Libraries Program, commonly known as “E-rate,” helps schools and libraries acquire Internet access and telecommunication products and services at affordable rates. Over the years, the E-rate program has provided critical support to public libraries that lack adequate infrastructure, helping them maintain their role as essential information hubs in communities across the country. While the program has been in existence for about 15 years, it has been difficult to determine just how many libraries have participated. Currently, the data that the Universal Services Administrative Company, the nonprofit corporation designated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to administer the E-rate program, makes available on its public data tool lists the applicants but not the awardees associated with each application. E-rate applications are often submitted on behalf of many individual libraries and school.” (via UpNext: The IMLS Blog)

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