Toronto Public Library scraps used book buying program

“The Toronto Public Library is ending a fledgling program to buy used books for its collection after authors complained that they were missing out on royalties and the pilot project proved disappointing, the city’s chief librarian said Tuesday. Launched Dec. 1, the initiative allowed Toronto residents to sell used books to the library for $5, provided the titles were on a list of in-demand adult fiction. The purpose of the program was to shorten hold times for readers and save money in a period of budget uncertainty. City Librarian Vickery Bowles acknowledged Tuesday that the project failed on both those counts in its short, four-month life span.” (via Toronto Star)

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New York Public Library to Break Ground on Expansion of Underground Storage for Research Materials at Iconic Building

“The New York Public Library breaks ground this week on a significant expansion of modern underground storage at its iconic Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street. The project – approved by the Library’s Board of Trustees in September 2012 – will transform 55,700 square feet of raw space underneath Bryant Park into state-of-the-art storage that can hold about 2.5 million research materials. With the additional storage space, the Library will hold as many or more research volumes on-site as it ever has: approximately 4 million research items. This will allow the Library to accommodate approximately 95 percent of all research requests with materials on-site.” (via The New York Public Library)

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Former Alamo custodians sue for artifacts in collection

“A group that served as guardians of the Alamo for more than a century before the state of Texas announced it was taking over day-to-day management of the historic site is suing for control of more than 30,000 books and artifacts at its library. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas filed suit Monday against the Texas General Land Office, alleging the agency “unilaterally declared” the state owner of the organization’s private library collection after Land Commissioner George P. Bush announced that he was ending the group’s management of the downtown San Antonio mission-turned-fortress.” (via AP)

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Four Kentucky university libraries select OCLC WorldShare Management Services

“Eastern Kentucky University, Kentucky State University, Northern Kentucky University and the University of Louisville have selected OCLC WorldShare Management Services as their library management system. WorldShare Management Services (WMS) provide cloud-based library management and discovery applications in an integrated suite. WMS offers librarians a cost-effective way to manage workflows efficiently, and improve access to library collections and services for their students, faculty and staff. The four university libraries are members of the State Assisted Academic Library Council of Kentucky (SAALCK), which was formed more than 40 years ago by the deans of the academic libraries to provide an opportunity to meet and discuss common needs and concerns.” (via OCLC)

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University of Rochester Libraries join HathiTrust

“The University of Rochester Libraries have become one of the newest members of HathiTrust, a worldwide partnership of more than one hundred major research institutions and libraries working to preserve and provide access to the cultural record in digital form. The University’s membership offers students, faculty, and staff access to nearly five million books in the public domain. “HathiTrust demonstrates the depth and richness of collections that result from the combined resources of many institutions,” said Mary Ann Mavrinac, vice provost and Andrew H. and Janet Dayton Neilly Dean of River Campus Libraries. “We are delighted to give our patrons access to this digital collection and to join this groundbreaking, collaborative effort.” (via University of Rochester)

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Qatar Digital Library Preserves The Music Of A Vanishing Past

The songs our grandparents sang can tell us who we are. Here in the U.S., the Lomax family became famous in the 1930s, when they recorded America’s folk music.In other countries that are changing fast, people are also trying to hold onto their heritage. The tiny, super-rich state of Qatar takes pride in its modernity, with its gleaming skyscrapers and lucrative gas fields. But it is also investing in a huge history project.The Qatar Digital Library began as a brainchild of the former first lady, Sheikha Mozah bint Nasser al-Missned, and was put together with Richard Gibby from the British Library.” (via NPR)

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Public library explores around-the-clock service

“What started as a nonprofit’s effort to find a safe spot for homeless youth has evolved into an experiment in making a public library more relevant to its community. The Salt Lake City Public Library recently launched an online survey to gather input on what residents would like to see if it opened around the clock, an idea that started when the Downtown Alliance asked if the library could serve as a destination for homeless teenagers after hours. That proposal violated the library’s mission of serving all constituencies, SLCPL executive director John Spears said. Instead, he suggested opening the building continuously, but to everyone.” (via AP)

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Cuts Likely To Shutter Vt. Law Library

“A nearly $500,000 cut to the Vermont Department of Libraries will likely result in the closure of the state law library. Earlier this week, the House Appropriations Committee decided to go with the governor’s recommendation to reduce the budget. According to State Librarian Martha Reid, the department is working with a consultant to determine the best way to take the cut, but the brunt of the reduction will be on the state law library. “The law library as we know it, I think it’s pretty clear that it’s going to disappear,” State Librarian Martha Reid said Thursday.” (via Valley News)

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Appeals court: Ky. library tax is legal

“Libraries in Kentucky might not have to close after all. The Kentucky Court of Appeals in a 3-0 decision reversed two circuit court decisions in Kenton and Campbell counties that declared that libraries in those counties had improperly raised taxes for decades, according to a statement from the Kenton County Libraries.” (via cincinnati.com)

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Libraries are Undergoing a Revival as Apartment Buildings

“In white-hot real estate markets like NYC, developers continue to seek out rapidly diminishing land for new projects. Many budget challenged local libraries, which operate on public land, continue to face a difficult challenge of operating in older buildings with maintenance and services that haven’t kept up with the times. Recently several public-private partnerships between libraries and developers offer a vision of what libraries are fast transforming into, apartments.” (via psfk.com)

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