Mother Teresa Painting Removed From Trumbull Library Over Copyright Infringement Complaints

“Trumbull officials have temporarily removed private artwork displayed in its public library to protect the town from possible litigation after concerns were raised referencing arguing the painting infringes on copyright with the use of Mother Teresa’s image. The painting, which Dr. Richard Resnick donated to the library, shows Mother Teresa and other women marching, holding signs that say messages including “Onward We March,” “Planned Parenthood,” “Mission of Charity,” “Feed the Poor,” “Sister of Mercy,” “Shelter the Poor,” “Remember The Ladies,” “Hospital Reform,” “Right to Vote,” “19th Amendment,” “Equal Wages for Us,” “Not For Ourselves Only.” (via NBC Connecticut)

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UT Joins Digital Public Library of America

“UT Libraries has partnered with the Tennessee State Library and Archives and the Tenn-Share statewide library consortium to become a service hub for the Digital Public Library of America. Tennessee’s service hub was one of four successful applicants added to the DPLA network in February 2015. For most of American history, the ability to access materials for free through public libraries has been a central part of the culture, producing generations of avid readers and a knowledgeable, engaged citizenry. The DPLA sustains that tradition by bringing together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and making them freely available online through a single platform and portal.” (via Tennessee Today)

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N.O. Public Library hopes to avert financial crisis

“The New Orleans Public Library is taking some steps to keep library doors open with funding running out. Thursday morning there was a Turn the Page on Literacy event for young students, with the hope of turning the page on its finances. The library is looking to make New Orleans the most literate city in America by 2018 and city leaders say they can’t do it without the money behind them to keep the libraries open.” (via WWLTV)

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Planned sale of rare books roils Gordon College

“When a wealthy family bequeathed a collection of rare Bibles and Shakespeare folios to Gordon College in 1922, it came with a catch: the works had to remain intact and with the school. That’s why a descendant of the late collector Edward Payson Vining, a railroad executive and bibliophile, was surprised to learn that Gordon plans to auction off 10 percent of the 7,000 volumes this fall. The sale is expected to fetch as much as $2.5 million.” (via The Boston Globe)

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Legislation filed to help libraries in lawsuit

“With the future of many libraries in Northern Kentucky in the hands of the Kentucky Court of Appeals, a bill introduced by a Kentucky lawmaker would address the issue at the heart of the controversial lawsuits challenging library taxes. House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins, D-Sandy Hook, introduced the bill that would allow library boards to raise property taxes just like any other taxing district and would declare valid all property tax rates passed since 1979. Libraries across the state await the appeals court’s decision on two rulings by circuit court judges in Campbell and Kenton counties that found libraries formed by petitions have improperly raised property taxes for more than 30 years.” (via cincinnati.com)

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“She blinded me with library science”: why the Feminist Library is more vital than ever

It’s a cold afternoon in Elephant and Castle, but the meeting room at the Feminist Library is packed with women. The range of ages is startling: as young children are led in by their father, an older woman is buying the donated Chelsea buns someone has brought along. Inside the library’s meeting room, people are beginning to gather around tables laid out with paper and pens. There’s a good reason for braving the cold, for today the Feminist Library is hosting “Knowledge is our Superpower”, the first in a series of salons celebrating the library’s 40th anniversary. Featuring a comic drawing workshop, a lecture on Batgirl and a panel discussion, the day is themed around a question whose answer is probably, in this setting, an inevitable conclusion: “does feminism need a library?” (via New Statesman)

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Notre Dame libraries launch online respository

“This month, Hesburgh Libraries launched CurateND, an online repository that allows students, faculty and staff to store, manage and share their research. Users can deposit a variety of types of content, including articles, datasets, documents, images and senior theses. They can also link different files, choose who and how many people can see or make changes to their content and preserve their work in the long-term. Anyone with a NetID can use the repository, for many kinds of research projects in many fields, said Rick Johnson, co-program director of the library’s Digital Initiatives and Scholarship department. He said the portal allows users to combine different file formats.” (via The Observer)

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UMass students, librarians want more faculty to use open source textbooks to save students money

“About 65 percent of college students don’t buy textbooks because of cost, said Matt Magalhaes, the affordable textbook campaign coordinator for MassPirg at the University of Massachusetts. Textbooks can cost students $1,200 a year. He and other students and librarians at the university are hoping that students will pressure their professors to adopt open source textbooks.” (via masslive.com)

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HistoricPlacesLA Catalogues Over 25,000 of L.A.’s Most Significant Buildings and Sites

“As the head of the City of Los Angeles’s historic preservation program, I’m amazed that I still sometimes get puzzled questions from people who think L.A. has no past. “Historic preservation in Los Angeles? Do you really have anything historic to preserve?” Yes, it’s true that Los Angeles came of age later than most of its East Coast or international counterparts, but it’s a city of remarkable history and architectural heritage.  And for anyone who’s still somehow unconvinced, I now have a ready retort: HistoricPlacesLA, Los Angeles Historic Resources Inventory, launched today at HistoricPlacesLA.org.” (via The Getty Iris)

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Remarkable Lessons In Innovation From A Public Library

“There are two ways to run a public library in a small town: the traditional way, or the Maxine Bleiweis way. For the past 17 years, Maxine has been the director of The Westport Library in our suburban town of 27,000 people. In her hands, the library hasn’t just been a place to get books. It’s been a vibrant tool for bringing out the best in others. The Library offers over 1,600 programs annually. To my eyes, Maxine has no conception of the word “can’t.” Some think that public libraries can’t be noisy, boisterous, provocative, outrageous or entertaining. They can’t buy – and program – robots, or attract thousands of inventors, scientists and hobbyists for a single event.” (via Forbes)

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