Jeffco library scrubs tweets after getting complaints that posts are politically biased

“The head of the Jefferson County Public Library this month deleted a series of tweets from the library’s Twitter account after a county commissioner complained they were politically biased. That has people in the county talking about the role of libraries as repositories of free expression and the unfettered exchange of ideas — and whether that mission could be jeopardized by the specter of online censorship.” (via Denver Post)

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UB librarians discuss how fake news creates a cycle of misinformation

“When Cynthia Tysick sees a news story on social media, she diligently fact-checks it on Snopes and PolitiFact.“I’ve suddenly become the fact-checking guru on my Facebook feed,” Tysick, head of UB Educational Services said. “People are not happy with me, but it’s a service I bring.”Tysick and her colleagues in UB Libraries feel students should have the ability to filter out real news from fake news. Fake news websites shell out dishonest and misleading information disguised as actual news, leaving many unable to tell the real from the fake. President Donald Trump has also blasted mainstream news organizations like CNN and The New York Times, calling them untrustworthy fake news organizations.” (via The Spectrum)

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What Students Can Learn By Writing For Wikipedia

“Fake news has been, well, in the news a lot lately. But for the world’s largest crowdsourced encyclopedia, it’s nothing new.”Wikipedia has been dealing with fake news since it started 16 years ago,” notes LiAnna Davis, deputy director of the Wiki Education Foundation.To combat misinformation, Wikipedia has developed a robust corps of volunteer editors. Anyone can write new entries and scrutinize existing ones for adherence to Wikipedia’s rules on sourcing and neutrality. While it’s not free of errors or pranks, what results is a resource that 50 million people turn to daily on hundreds of thousands of topics in a few dozen languages.” (via NPR)

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Black History Month: Librarian of Congress on her Trailblazing Role

“The first African-American and first woman to hold the position of librarian of Congress says she is partly in her role thanks to the inspiration of Frederick Douglass. Carla Hayden, who was sworn in last year, discusses with Roll Call the significance of Black History Month, her own place in it and how African-American culture and history is integral to American culture and history.” (via Roll Call)

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Open Access policy adopted by IU Bloomington faculty

“We are happy to write that the Bloomington Faculty Council unanimously approved an Open Access policy this afternoon that ensures that faculty scholarship will be accessible and available to the public for future generations. Open Access means that scholarly articles are regarded as the fruits of research that authors give to the world for the sake of inquiry and knowledge without expectation of payment. Adopting such a policy reduces barriers to research and learning by making research available on the public internet to be downloaded and shared freely, making it possible for scholarship to be more widely read and cited than literature that appears in closed-access, licensed journal databases.” (via Scholarly Communication)

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