How Employees Shaped Strategy at the New York Public Library

“The New York Public Library is one of the largest public libraries in the world, with 18 million visitors yearly, a budget of nearly $300m, and 93 branches. It serves vastly diverse populations: toddlers and caregivers, new immigrants, lifelong learners, famous novelists, and scholars. Although based in New York City, it serves a global audience of researchers and tourists. Library leaders knew that given the immense changes brought on by digital innovations, as well as shifts in the communities that the communities that the Library served, it would need to evolve. How to transform such a huge, iconic institution, wrapped in history, into a nimble player? How to provide hyper-local services tailored to the diverse needs of its patrons while also upholding a consistent and high standard of service?” (via Harvard Business Review)

Leave a Comment

Growing Up in a Library Is Exactly As Magical As You’d Imagine

“For a certain type of bookish kid (or, let’s be honest, adult), living in the library sounds like a dream. But when the Clark family moved into the Washington Heights branch of the New York Public Library in the late 1940s, their teenage son Ronald Clark was skeptical.“Kids are strange,” he says. “We always want to be normal. So at first I was a little ashamed that I lived in a library.” His family had moved from a small town in Maryland, where everyone knew each other, for his father to take a job as the library’s custodian.” (via Atlas Obscura)

Leave a Comment

Banned Books and Blockbusters

“Contrary to what, Googling around, you might assume, obscenity is not protected by the First Amendment. “There is a bone in my ***** six inches long. I will ream out every wrinkle in your ****.” Those sentences are from the opening pages of Henry Miller’s first novel, “Tropic of Cancer,” which was published in France in 1934. Are they obscene? It took thirty years, but American courts eventually decided that they are not, and therefore the book they appear in cannot be banned.” (via The New Yorker)

Editors Note: I added the * to the post. The actual article has the dirty words.

Leave a Comment

Harvesting Government History, One Web Page at a Time

“By noon on Thursday, Davis Erin Anderson had copied the addresses of a few dozen websites and online PDFs that listed signs of climate change by state and region.In a book-lined room on the third floor of the New York Academy of Medicine in Manhattan, Ms. Anderson was hunched over a laptop, working her way through a list of states. All of the material had been posted by federal agencies, and Ms. Anderson was sending it off to an archive so that it would not disappear when the new presidential administration took office in January.” (via The New York Times)

Leave a Comment

Rose Library acquires papers of Southern civil rights journalist Gene Patterson

“The Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library has acquired the papers of the late Eugene Patterson, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, editor of the Atlanta Constitution and the Washington Post, and a significant voice for civil rights in the 1960s.Patterson’s papers include correspondence, photographs, subject files and six large scrapbooks filled with his daily columns. As editor of The Atlanta Constitution, Patterson received widespread national attention for his column “A Flower for the Graves,” about the Birmingham church bombing that killed four young girls on Sept. 15, 1963. The column, published the next day, was so moving that Patterson was invited to read it aloud that night on the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite.” (via Emory University)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2016, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.