Kevin L. Smith arrives on campus as dean of KU Libraries

“Kevin L. Smith, former director of copyright and scholarly communication at Duke University, has joined the University of Kansas as dean for KU Libraries. Smith succeeds interim co-deans Kent Miller and Mary Roach, who assumed their roles following the departure of Dean Lorraine Haricombe. Haricombe was named vice provost and director of libraries at the University of Texas at Austin in 2014. During his tenure at Duke, Smith advised faculty, staff and students on issues of copyright, intellectual property and open access to the Duke community and beyond.” (via University of Kansas)

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Toronto library workers say they’re heading for strike

“More than 2,000 library workers will strike Monday, shutting Toronto’s 100 branches, unless the city gets serious about negotiating a new contract, their union says.With a strike or lockout possible at midnight Sunday, talks are at a “crisis point,” Maureen O’Reilly, president of CUPE Local 4948, told reporters Wednesday.“I am extremely concerned about the state of negotiations right now,” O’Reilly said, and if they don’t improve library staff will be on picket lines Monday instead of opening branches.” (via Toronto Star)

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Find, Prioritize, and Recommend: An article recommendation system to fill knowledge gaps across Wikipedia

“The French Wikipedia may have more than 20,000 articles on individual asteroids, but if you are one of 27 million people speaking Hausa as a first language, Wikipedia doesn’t yet have an entry on the universe. The English Wikipedia may have more than 5 million articles on topics as diverse as extreme sports or unusual causes of death, but if English is the only language you speak, there is still little to no content to learn from about vast regions of the world—as the map above suggests.” (via Wikimedia blog)

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The New England Journal of Medicine Content Now Discoverable through ReadCube

“ReadCube is pleased to announce its agreement with the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the world’s most trusted and influential source of medical knowledge and clinical best practices, to index its content across ReadCube’s platform as a part of the Discover service. Over 180,000 articles including original research, review, perspective, and commentary articles are now fully enhanced and deep-indexed for improved discoverability across ReadCube’s web, desktop, and mobile reading portals; search engines; and personalized recommendation feeds.” (via ReadCube)

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Wikipedia Is Basically a Corporate Bureaucracy, According to a New Study

“Wikipedia is a voluntary organization dedicated to the noble goal of decentralized knowledge creation. But as the community has evolved over time, it has wandered further and further from its early egalitarian ideals, according to a new paper published in the journal Future Internet. In fact, such systems usually end up looking a lot like 20th century bureaucracies.Even in the brave new world of online communities, the Who had it right: “Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.” (via Gizmodo)

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The Next Librarian of Congress: History Has Its Eyes on Her

“In February 2016, President Barack Obama nominated Carla D. Hayden, CEO of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, for the open Librarian of Congress position–which has been temporarily filled by David S. Mao after James H. Billington retired in September 2015. … The first step to confirming Hayden’s nomination is approval by the U.S. Senate. This process began on April 20, with a hearing held by the U.S. Senate Committee on Rules and Administration.” (via Information Today)

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Library director reflects on dramatic changes as retirement draws near

“People who have known Skokie Public Library Director Carolyn Anthony for more than three decades also know that the library she will leave behind this summer has little resemblance to the one she inherited.The library has expanded and been redesigned and reorganized; long-needed parking was finally acquired; resources and databases and materials for checkout were changed and re-prioritized; programming evolved and expanded substantially — and all of it accomplished not just to keep up with 21st Century needs, Anthony says, but to try to stay ahead of them.” (via Chicago Tribune)

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Weeding the Worst Library Books

“Last summer, in Berkeley, California, librarians pulled roughly forty thousand books off the shelves of the public library and carted them away. The library’s director, Jeff Scott, announced that his staff had “deaccessioned” texts that weren’t regularly checked out. But the protesters who gathered on the library’s front steps to decry what became known as “Librarygate” preferred a different term: “purged.” “Put a tourniquet on the hemorrhage,” one of the protesters’ signs declared. “Don’t pulp our fiction,” another read.” (via The New Yorker)

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American Libraries launches Dewey Decibel podcast

“American Libraries, the magazine of the American Library Association, just launched the Dewey Decibel podcast. Hosted by AL Associate Editor Phil Morehart, this new monthly podcast series will feature conversations with librarians, authors, thinkers, scholars, and other experts, on a variety of topics from the library world and beyond.” (vi ALA)

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Engaging librarians (and others) through social technologies: A #1lib1ref think-piece

“The Wikimedia movement has long prospered at the intersection of technology and social initiative. After all, the [edit] button on the top of every page is a deceptively simple piece of technology that allows communities of editors to continuously improve the “sum of all human knowledge.” As Wikipedia’s community has grown, so have technologies that allow increasingly sophisticated ways of advancing our amazing mission. How can we take these collaborations even further?As part of the Wikipedia 15 birthday celebration (#Wikipedia15) in January 2016, the Wikipedia Library team (@WikiLibrary) ran a social media campaign asking librarians all over the world to “Imagine a World where Every Librarian Added One More Reference to Wikipedia.” We called it #1lib1ref.” (via Wikimedia blog)

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