Archive | News RSS feed for this section

Unpopular books flying off branch libraries’ shelves

“At the Dudley Branch of the Boston Public Library, clustered volumes fill only half of many long, red shelves; the rest stand empty. In the adult nonfiction section, some shelves are completely barren. The library, in Roxbury, once brimmed with books. But officials have been steadily culling its collection the past few months as part of a push by BPL administrators to dispose of up to 180,000 little-used volumes from shelves and archives of branches citywide by year’s end. Library officials say the reductions help assure that patrons can comfortably sift through a modern selection that serves their needs.” (via Boston Globe)

Leave a Comment

Paul Otlet, Google, Wikipedia, and cataloging the world

“As soon as humanity began its quest for knowledge, people have also attempted to organize that knowledge. From the invention of writing to the abacus, from medieval manuscripts to modern paperbacks, from microfiche to the Internet, our attempt to understand the world — and catalog it in an orderly fashion with dictionaries, encyclopedias, libraries, and databases — has evolved with new technologies. One man on the quest for order was innovator, idealist, and scientist Paul Otlet, who is the subject of the new book Cataloging the World. We spoke to author Alex Wright about his research process, Paul Otlet’s foresight into the future of global information networks, and Otlet’s place in the history of science and technology.” (via OUPblog)

Leave a Comment

National Geographic joins Scribd

“We’re thrilled to announce another great addition of some of National Geographic’s most popular titles to our library of more than 400,000 books. A lot of us have fond memories of the iconic yellow border gracing the bookshelves and coffee tables of our youth, and we’re proud to bring these world-expanding titles to Scribd. “Scribd’s wide audience and established brand make them a natural partner. We are very pleased to be adding our books to their flagship subscription product and attracting new readers around the globe,” says Rachel Graham, Senior Director of Digital Book Publishing for National Geographic.” (via The Scribd Blog)

Leave a Comment

LINCOLN’S HANDWRITING FOUND ON BOOK ABOUT RACE

“For years, librarians at a small central Illinois library gossiped that a tattered book lying on one of its shelves justifying racism may have been in the hands of none other than Abraham Lincoln, the Great Emancipator. On Tuesday, state historians confirmed that theory by announcing Lincoln’s handwriting had been found inside the cover of the 700-page text, at the same time taking great pains to offer reassurance that the former president who ended slavery didn’t subscribe to the theories at hand, but likely read the book to better educate himself about his opponents’ line of thinking.” (via The Associated Press)

Leave a Comment

Amazon Same-Day Delivery Expanding – “Get It Today” Available in Six More Cities

“Amazon.com has expanded Same-Day Delivery with new “Get It Today” capabilities for customers in Baltimore, Dallas, Indianapolis, New York City, Philadelphia and Washington DC metro areas, with more than a million eligible items now available for same-day delivery. Starting today, customers can order as late as noon, seven days a week and get things like popular movies, video games, last-minute travel needs, back-to-school supplies and family necessities delivered to their home the same day. Prime members pay $5.99 for all the same-day delivery items they can order.” (via Amazon)

Leave a Comment

How rumors spread via sloppy citation practices

“Spinach is not an exceptional nutritional source of iron. The leafy green has iron, yes, but not much more than you’d find in other green vegetables. And the plant contains oxalic acid, which inhibits iron absorption. Why, then, do so many people believe spinach boasts such high iron levels? Scholars committed to unmasking spinach’s myths have long offered a story of academic sloppiness. German chemists in the 1930s misplaced a decimal point, the story goes. They thus overestimated the plant’s iron content tenfold. But this story, it turns out, is apocryphal. It’s another myth, perpetuated by academic sloppiness of another kind. The German scientists never existed. Nor did the decimal point error occur. At least, we have no evidence of either. Because, you see, although academics often see themselves as debunkers, in skewering one myth they may fall victim to another.” (via insidehighered)

Leave a Comment

Wikimedia Foundation releases its first transparency report

“We are happy to announce the release of the Wikimedia Foundation’s first transparency report. Transparency is a tenet of the Wikimedia movement.  Anyone can see how a Wikipedia article is created and how it evolves, and anyone can contribute to the software that runs the Wikimedia projects. The transparency report we share today is in furtherance of our commitment to such openness. Every year, the Wikimedia Foundation, a nonprofit organization, receives requests from governments, individuals, and organizations to disclose information about our users or to change content on the Wikimedia projects. This transparency report is the amalgamation of two years of data — it details the number of requests we received, where these requests came from, and how we responded to them.” (via Wikimedia blog)

Leave a Comment

Agreement helps library publishers participate in CrossRef

“CrossRef and the California Digital Library (CDL) have signed an agreement that promises to open up a route for library publishers to participate in the scholarly communications hub created by CrossRef. Through the agreement, publishers using CDL’s EZID digital identifier service now may choose to deposit the metadata for their content in the CrossRef system. This move will enable them to use the full range of CrossRef services, including search and discovery, persistent linking, tracking of funding and licensing information, text and data mining, and more. As a CrossRef Sponsoring Publisher, EZID will handle the technical and administrative processes for its client publishers, which promises to reduce barriers to their CrossRef participation.” (via Research Information)

Leave a Comment

Queens Borough President Melinda Katz urges court to allow her to remove library trustees

“Queens Borough President Melinda Katz is urging a Brooklyn federal court to dismiss a lawsuit filed by six trustees of the scandal-plagued Queens Library. The trustees, seeking to block her ouster of them, claim a new state law that grants both Katz and the mayor the power to remove any trustee before the end of their normal five-year term is unconstitutional. But Katz, in legal papers filed Monday by City Corporation Counsel Zachary Carter, noted she acted after a series of Daily News articles revealed extraordinary spending including the $392,000 annual salary of the library’s chief executive Thomas Galante.” (via NY Daily News)

Leave a Comment

NIXON TAPES RELEASED ON RESIGNATION’S ANNIVERSARY

“Almost a decade after Richard Nixon resigned, the disgraced former president sat down with his one-time aide and told the tale of his fall from grace in his own words. For three decades, that version of one of the nation’s largest and most-dissected political scandals largely gathered dust – until this week.

Starting Tuesday, to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Nixon’s resignation, portions of the tapes will be published each day by the Nixon Presidential Library & Museum and the private Richard Nixon Foundation.” (via The Associated Press)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2014, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.