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Professors See Shift in Academic Attitudes on Wikipedia

“While professors, scholars, and other academics in the early 2000s cautioned students not to consult Wikipedia at all when researching, attitudes concerning the popular online encyclopedia are shifting, according to some Harvard professors. Some professors in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences said they see Wikipedia as more acceptable, even as a website that students can peruse for somewhat reliable information. Although they still warned students to be wary when using Wikipedia, some professors no longer look at the site with the same criticism.” (via he Harvard Crimson)

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Ferguson library director looks for new ways to serve community

“In the days after the August shooting death of Michael Brown, the city of Ferguson was in turmoil. Schools closed. Many businesses closed. But at the city’s public library, director Scott Bonner’s motto was to just say yes. “We’ve done everything from when the schools shut down for a week, we had an ad hoc school that we put together with volunteers. We’ve had the Small Business Administration come in doing emergency loans. We’ve had Circus Harmony teaching kids how to do circus things. We’ve had all kinds of stuff,” Bonner told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Wednesday. “I hear a lot of good things from people in the community.” (via St. Louis Public Radio)

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Princeton University acquires philosopher Jacques Derrida’s personal library filled with handwritten notes

“French philosopher Jacques Derrida did not just glance at words on a page when reading. He covered the pages with scribbled notes and cross-references, inserting other handwritten materials and incorporating what he read into what he wrote. Princeton University’s Firestone Library has acquired Derrida’s personal collection of about 13,800 published books and other materials, school officials announced Wednesday. As they are processed, the pieces will be made available to scholars through the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections in the library.” (via NJ.com)

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America’s ‘national library’ is lacking in leadership, yet another report finds

“The federal government’s watchdog agency released a critical report Tuesday on the Library of Congress’s long-standing failures to manage the complex computer systems that are vital to its mission. The result of a year-long investigation by the Government Accountability Office, the report reveals a work environment lacking central oversight and faults Librarian of Congress James H. Billington for ignoring repeated calls to hire a chief information officer, as required by law.” (via The Washington Post)

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NYU Libraries to Team with Internet Archive to Preserve High Quality Musical Content on the Web

“New York University Libraries is leading a collaboration with NYU’s Moving Image Archiving and Preservation (MIAP) program and San Francisco-based Archive-It, a service of the Internet Archive (IA) to ensure that the websites of musical composers can be collected, preserved, and made accessible today and in the future, with sound and visual quality at a level significantly higher than current web archiving standards. The project, Archiving the Websites of Contemporary Composers, is funded with a grant of $480,000 from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.” (via NYU)

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Queens Library pledges accountability in budget hearing

“The Queens Library, criticized for the free-spending ways of its former CEO, held its first public budget hearing Monday night as its new leaders pledged an era of accountability. “Our goal having this hearing tonight is to create a transparent budget process,” said Carl Koerner, president of the Board of Trustees. A small crowd of library patrons and boosters attended the hearing at the Flushing Library to ask for extended library hours, renovations and more money for books and other materials.” (via NY Daily News)

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Queens Library Fills Void After Closure of City’s Last Sheet Music Store

“The musical void left by the reported closure of the New York’s last classical sheet music store is being filled by the Queens Library. The institution has built the city’s largest collection of music scores that’s available to check out — a compilation that’s gained importance since the Frank Music Company, on West 54th St. between Broadway and Eighth Avenue, closed earlier this month.” (via DNAinfo.com New York)

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Vote will keep controversial book in school library

“A concerned parent said a high school library book is pornographic and that it promotes prostitution and child abuse, but a school district committee voted to keep that controversial book in the library. “I just started going throughout the whole entire book, looking at it,” said Catrenna Lopez, mother of a freshman at Rio Rancho High School. Lopez took cellphone pictures after seeing the book her 15-year-old son brought home from the school library last month. “First thing I did was open up the book and come to a sex scene in the book,” Lopez said.” (via KRQE News 13)

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Spread the words: Little Free Libraries find global following

“Maybe “little” isn’t such an apt description anymore of those book houses people put up in their yards. Five years after Todd Bol put up the first Little Free Library in front of his house in Hudson, Wis., the grassroots book lending program has popped up everywhere from Iceland to Tasmania. There are about 25,000 Little Free Libraries around the globe today and it’s growing faster than ever. “We’re going to pass McDonald’s by Thanksgiving,” Bol said. “There’s going to be more Little Free Libraries than McDonald’s, which is great.” (via Minnesota Public Radio News)

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App That Aims To Make Books ‘Squeaky Clean’ Draws Ire From Edited Writers

“In a stroke of irony fit for fiction, an effort by two Idaho parents to clean up their daughter’s books has dredged up a fairly messy controversy. Clean Reader — an e-reader app designed to ferret out, and block, profanity in novels and nonfiction — drew significant pushback from some authors amid its recent launch. In the face of that criticism, the folks behind Clean Reader have now backed down, announcing their intentions to stop selling books directly through the e-reading platform.”(via NPR)

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