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Why Hennepin County Library is destroying thousands of books

“Hundreds of thousands of perfectly good books are being tossed in recycling bins at a Hennepin County library. An outraged library worker was told “that’s the way it works, so get used to it,” but she still thinks it’s a waste. The library worker says many books are going straight from a shelf to a dumpster. As a county employee and a book lover, it’s put her in a tough spot. “It made me feel sick,” she said. “I was horrified.” Officially, the Hennepin County Library system says they “deselect” about 500,000 books, DVDs and other material every year. Many of those materials are sold, and the last resort is recycling.” (via KMSP-TV)

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On Long Island, Bookstores and Libraries Expand Their Offerings

“When Marty Schwartz and Melinda Nasti take a vacation, they make a point of finding live-music venues. “We’re really attracted to places with folk singers,” Ms. Nasti said on the day after Christmas, while she and Mr. Schwartz, who live in Port Washington, sat at a corner table in the 20-seat cafe at the Dolphin Bookshop there. They were there not to thumb through a stack of best sellers, but to listen as Fred Hintze, a musician from Lake Panamok, on eastern Long Island, strummed his guitar and sang.” (via NYTimes.com)

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Pushing History Into the Digital Age

“She’s a Budapest-born American. He’s a Brooklyn-born Brit. Together they are helping to digitize some of the most important documents of American history. The New York Public Library will announce a $500,000 donation from the Polonsky Foundation, the family foundation of Georgette F. Bennett and Leonard S. Polonsky. Funding projects that help make historical documents accessible to more people comes from a “fervent belief in the democratization of knowledge,” said Dr. Bennett.” (via WSJ)

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ProQuest Digitizes the Early 20th Century’s Most Influential British Magazines

“ProQuest is improving outcomes for researchers of British politics, news, culture and society by boosting the availability of digital primary sources from the first half of the 20th century. Its new British Periodicals Collection III digitizes the archives of the most important magazines of the period – all highly influential in their mix of news, politics, art, photography, literature and satire – and extends the scope of the popular British Periodicals program. The collection enriches context-based exploration of important attitudes, events and movements, such as empire and decolonization, first-wave feminism, and consumer society. British Periodicals Collection III is part of ProQuest’s massive global digitization program that’s rescuing rare, important and fragile print works and making their contents available to researchers.” (via Proquest)

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Local artist Daniel Rotsztain draws all 99 Toronto libraries

“While most people shuffle through a period of unemployment doling out resumes, one Toronto man decided to spend it travelling to each of the city’s 99 public libraries. From the end of August to October, 25-year-old artist and geographer Daniel Rotsztain boarded buses, trains, streetcars and his bike with an inky pen in hand and plenty of paper. His goal was to capture the city’s bastions of books by drawing each one of them in a “homey, but blue print style”— a feat he sometimes conquered amidst scorching heat and drizzling rain.” (via Toronto Star)

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Texas State Archives to Provide Online Access to Texas Senate Recordings

“The Texas State Library and Archives announces the culmination of a digitization project that expands access to the Texas Senate audio recordings dating from 1972 to 2006. The project was made possible in part by funds awarded to TSLAC through the Library Services and Technology Act from the Institute of Museum and Library Services in February of 2013. Under guidelines set by IMLS, financial resources were applied to expand services for learning and public access to information and educational resources.” (via TSLAC)

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Data Management Plans, Collaborative Research Governance, and the Consent to Share

“Libraries and library professionals are emerging as major stakeholders in the data management business and continue to position themselves as viable institutional custodians of large collections of research data and research records. In the push to promote open access initiatives and meet recent national funding agency data management planning requirements, academic research libraries are promoting data management education and open access to research outputs, including data. The intent of this post is to encourage library professionals to think about how data management planning and data sharing discussions might be tailored to the research context—in short, to explain how data management planning and sharing protocols can be used to support researcher workflows.” (via CLIR)

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University of California Libraries to partner with Archive-It

“This week, the University of California California Digital Libraries and the UC Libraries announced a partnership with Internet Archive’s Archive-It Service. In the coming year, CDL’s Web Archiving Service (WAS) collections and all core infrastructure activities, i.e., crawling, indexing, search, display, and storage, will be transferred to Archive-It. WAS partners have captured close to 80 terabytes of archived content most of which will be added to the 450 terabytes Archive-It partners have collected.” (via Internet Archive Blogs)

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Wikipedia turns 14, receives prestigious Erasmus Prize 2015

“Today, Wikipedia turns fourteen years old. On this day in 2001, a simple idea changed the world: the idea that anyone, no matter who they are or where they lived, had something to contribute to the sum of all human knowledge. It was a simple idea, but intensely powerful, and it resonated with hundreds of thousands of people. Together, your contributions have made Wikipedia the most comprehensive repository of free information in the history of humanity.” (via Wikimedia blog)

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[UMass] Libraries Launch Retrospective Digitization of Theses, Dissertations

“The Libraries have embarked on an ambitious program to digitize all university theses and dissertations and make them available online to the public, according to librarian Jessica Adamick, assistant to the associate director for library services. The research works have been available in electronic format since 1997 for dissertations and 2007 for theses, but public online access has not been available. Other dissertations and theses spanning more than 100 years have long been available only in print.” (via UMass Amherst)

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