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The big city library as Internet provider

“As our Brian Fung detailed last week, some of the United States’ bigger urban library systems have begun lodging a public protest against the formula federal rulemakers are considering for the distribution of billions of dollars for wireless Internet infrastructure. The Federal Communications Commission is thinking of divvying up so-called E-Rate funds to libraries based on square footage rather than users or some other metric, a calculation that city libraries argue gives an unfair advantage to their more sprawling suburban counterparts. And now perhaps the biggest name in the U.S. public libraries has dipped into the debate.” (via The Washington Post)

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Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum Houses Sport’s Greatest Collection of Books and Magazines

“It is fitting that the quietest place at Wimbledon is the library. “It’s an oasis,” said Audrey Snell, who has worked there for 15 years. About 40,000 fans crowd onto the grounds of the All England Lawn Tennis Club each day during the tournament, filling Centre Court, smothering Henman Hill and shuffling among matches, sipping Pimm’s and nibbling strawberries. Only a few each day find their way to the library, with the sport’s greatest collection of books and magazines.” (via NYT)

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Big Ten Libraries: Borrowing from the Best

“When Shakiela Morton started researching the lack of STEM preparation for African-American girls in urban schools, she found nearly two-dozen articles in the Rutgers libraries, but none of the books she needed to add weight to her independent project. Then she clicked on a link on the university library’s website for UBorrow – a service provided by the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), the consortium that Rutgers joined in July 2013. She discovered she could search through the collections of Big Ten school libraries and found four books on black women in science, technology, engineering and math to boost her research. “It was great because it gave me more access to a bigger pool of data to support my research,’’ said Morton, a student in the School of Communication and Information and a member of Douglass Residential College. At some point she wants to have her work published. “I want people to see that it wasn’t based on just personal experience, but on studies and research from others who are interested in this topic,’’ she said.” (via Rutgers)

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News stories ‘forgotten’ from Google searches

“British news outlets are having their stories removed from European Google searches under the continent’s “right to be forgotten.” The Guardian, BBC and the Daily Mail have reported that their stories are being deleted from searches within Europe, which writers worried would be a threat to journalism. At the BBC, economics journalist Robert Peston wrote that he received a notification from Google on Wednesday that the Internet giant is “no longer able to show” Europeans a link to a 2007 blog post to. The post was about a former head of investment bank Merrill Lynch who was forced out after the bank suffered “colossal losses” on some of its investments.” (via TheHill)

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Building a collection of financial education materials for a library near you

“We want to make libraries the go-to place for financial information in every community. And so far, we’ve been met with tremendous enthusiasm – from other government and nonprofit agencies, by library associations and administrators, and by librarians themselves. That’s why we’ve put together resources and materials for libraries to use in their community. We started this project about a year ago by listening to a group of nine librarians who agreed to work with us. After we announced the initiative in April, the number of libraries that wanted to participate swelled to nearly 50 library systems. Last week, we announced a partnership with Rhode Island’s Office of Library and Information Services, our first partnership with a state-wide impact, increasing our reach to more than 100 library systems. More importantly, these 100 systems have more than 450 branch locations that receive more than 76 million visits a year.” (via CFBP)

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2014 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition—thousands of engaged attendees, lively programs and events

“18,626 librarians, library workers and library supporters (including 5,607 exhibitors) from around the world joined energetically in the shared endeavor of “Transforming our libraries, ourselves” at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition, June 26-July 1 in Las Vegas. Attendees took part in spirited and productive conversations, sessions, problem-solving, events, discovery of the latest products and services and networking throughout the Las Vegas Convention Center and other venues. The program included more than 2,700 scheduled programs, sessions and events.” (via ALA)

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Brooklyn’s central library branch needs $100 million in repairs for a wrecked roof, cracked windows, creaky elevators and faulty air conditioning

“When it comes to Brooklyn’s central library branch, the books tell a story of decay. The 60-branch system’s crown jewel needs a whopping $100 million in repairs and only has enough money on hand to cover $30 million, new records show. Among the most pressing needs: a wrecked roof, cracked windows, creaky elevators, faulty air conditioning and ancient fire alarms. Bad as they are, those problems pale in comparison to the disgraceful bathrooms, which subject patrons to busted toilets and sinks and — worse — inadequate ventilation.” (via NY Daily News)

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7 surprises about libraries in our surveys

“The Pew Research Center’s studies about libraries and where they fit in the lives of their communities and patrons have uncovered some surprising facts about what Americans think of libraries and the way they use them. As librarians around the world are gathered in Las Vegas for the American Library Association’s annual conference, here are findings that stand out from our research, our typology of public library engagement and the quiz we just released that people can take to see where they compare with our national survey findings: What kind of library user are you?” (via Pew Research Center)

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Pennsylvania libraries feeling pressures of continued funding cuts

“Pennsylvania’s public libraries endured the pain of the funding ax in recent years, cutting back on staff, services, new book purchases and hours of operation. In Washington County, the situation is about to become more dire — one community’s library might have to close altogether. Citizens and Chartiers-Houston libraries, two Washington County libraries that rely on school districts for a portion of their funding, learned in recent weeks that the districts — Trinity Area and Chartiers-Houston — will eliminate their appropriations to the libraries due to budget constraints. The news comes in a year when the state public library subsidy, a portion of the education budget, has fallen to $53.5 million from $75.1 million in 2008-09.” (via Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

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New York Public Library Looks at Innovative Models for Renovation

“The New York Public Library is looking south for inspiration as it goes back to the drawing board for a planned renovation of its landmark Fifth Avenue building and the branch across the street. Library officials say they are considering two innovative libraries in Tennessee and North Carolina as models for creating high-tech, collaborative spaces. Chattanooga Public Library’s “4th Floor” is a so-called maker space stocked with 3-D printers and even a loom. North Carolina State University’s James B. Hunt Jr. Library in Raleigh features writable surfaces on walls and tables, and massive video screens for displaying data.” (via WSJ)

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