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As Senate begins debating education bill, happy words and better libraries

“Senators began work in earnest Wednesday on a bipartisan bill to replace No Child Left Behind by congratulating themselves on finally taking up legislation that is eight years overdue, and then unanimously passing an amendment to support school libraries. That comity is likely to yield to more vigorous debate in the days ahead, but for the moment, the Senate was filled with kind words and cooperation.” (Via Washington Post)

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EXCLUSIVE: NYC City Controller Scott Stringer urges DA, IRS to probe financial abuse at Queens Library

Financial abuse at Queens Library was so out of control that city Controller Scott Stringer is urging the IRS and local prosecutors to launch criminal probes against both Thomas Galante, the library’s ousted president, and his successor, Bridget Quinn-Carey, the Daily News has learned. Stringer’s 18-month audit of the library has concluded that Galante and Quinn-Carey, the library’s former chief operating officer and now interim president, racked up more than $310,000 in prohibited personal expenses on their library credit cards over a three-year period ending June 30, 2014.” (Via The Daily News)

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Preserving Boston library’s treasures a test for Mayor Walsh

“It’s a large room — 216 feet long by 39 feet wide — with a dusty, cluttered-attic vibe. Rows of metal shelves hold storage boxes of varied sizes, each stacked with prints and photos. Old filing cabinets and empty picture frames line the walls. This is where the Boston Public Library now stores 200,000 prints and 120,000 chromolithographs that make up a major part of its special collections. From this room, two prints — one by Albrecht Dürer, valued at $600,000, and one by Rembrandt, worth $20,000 to $30,000 — went missing and then turned up under somewhat mysterious circumstances. But not before intense media coverage of their disappearance led to the resignation of BPL president Amy Ryan, which was followed by the resignation of Jeffrey B. Rudman as chairman of the library’s board of trustees.” (via Boston Globe)

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When America’s Librarians Went To War

“Looking back at the nationwide support for American troops in the two world wars, we see Americans of all stripes making patriotic contributions and sacrifices — including farmers, factory workers and librarians. Wait. What? How did librarians fit in to national security in the 20th century? In an array of ways, says Cara Bertram, an archivist for the American Library Association. Libraries were established at hospitals and military bases.” (via NPR)

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Where are the books? Libraries under fire as they shift from print to digital.

“The hallmark of public libraries — the printed book, bound by covers and centuries of page-turning — is being shoved aside by digital doppelgangers. Around the country, libraries are slashing their print collections in favor of e-books, prompting battles between library systems and print purists, including not only the pre-pixel generation but digital natives who represent a sizable portion of the 1.5?billion library visits a year and prefer print for serious reading.” (Via Washington Post)

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Sisters donate $1.2 million to UA libraries

Three sisters made an estate gift worth more than $1.2 million to University of Arkansas at Fayetteville’s library system, according to a news release. The donation will be used to buy library materials, such as books, periodicals and digital resources, UA said. Agnes Lytton Reagan, Mary Sue Reagan and Betty Lynn Reagan all attended the university. Agnes Lytton Reagan graduated from the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences in 1935. Mary Sue Reagan graduated in 1942, and Betty Lynn Reagan graduated in 1945.” (via nwaonline.com)

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Timmins Public Library reverses decision on boys-only robotics event after girl’s petition

“When nine-year-old Cash Cayen tried to sign up for a summer robotics session at the Timmins Public Library, she was told it was for boys only. So, with the help of her mom, she started a Change.org petition asking the library to let girls participate too — and it worked thanks to the public’s support. “She will be allowed in the program, as will any others wishing to take part,” Timmins Mayor Steven Black told Yahoo Canada News. The controversy began when Cash, an avid participant in local library activities, tried to sign up for a July 20 robotics event, but was turned away because of her gender.” (Via Yahoo)

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Colorado College plans $45 million expansion, renovation of library

“The “brain” of the Colorado College campus is on its way to becoming a lot smarter. Plans are advancing for a proposed $45 million expansion and renovation of Tutt Library at 1021 N. Cascade Ave. “It will become an academic hub and the brain of the campus, which is what an academic library is about,” said Brian Young, chief technology officer at CC and a member of the library renovation team.” (via The Gazette)

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Baltimore’s Enoch Pratt’s central library to get first major renovation

“When Baltimore’s grand library opened on Cathedral Street in 1933, the building’s ornate appointments and display windows were evocative of those in the department stores that lined nearby Howard Street. It also featured a street-level entrance and sprawling central hall that beckoned visitors inside. Unlike most city businesses of that era, the new building echoed benefactor Enoch Pratt’s vision that his pioneering lending library should warmly welcome everyone — “rich and poor without distinction of race or color.” (Via Baltimore Sun)

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Library card denied in 1942 now is hers

“Pearl Thompson was a college student in Raleigh in 1942 when she was told she couldn’t check out a book from the public library because she was black. She was sent to the library’s basement, where she had to wait for a staff member to bring her the book she was assigned to read for a history class at Shaw University. Blacks weren’t issued library cards, so she had to stay in the basement to read it. Seventy-three years later, at age 92, Thompson finally has her library card. Thompson, who now lives in Cincinnati, entered the Cameron Village Regional Library in Raleigh on Thursday, aided by a walker, to attend a ceremony in her honor.” (Via Dispatch.com)

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