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UC Press, California Digital Library receive grant to improve publication system

“University of California Press and the California Digital Library, or CDL, received a grant of $750,000 earlier this month to develop a Web-based workflow-management system that would improve the publication process of open-access monographs. The two-year grant — awarded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which supports works in the arts and humanities — is intended to promote the publication of social science monographs, which are detailed written studies of specific subject areas. UC Press and the CDL are developing the system to help decrease the costs and increase the efficiency of the academic publication process.” (via DailyCal.org)

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Alameda County: Librarian connects incarcerated youths to lesser-known writers

Literacy can save a life — or at least define one. Manifested in the personal and professional life of librarian and advocate Amy Cheney, the idea comes to full fruition for the incarcerated youths at the Alameda County Juvenile Justice Center. Cheney’s “Write to Read” program brings library services and materials to underserved youth. The 54-year-old Oakland resident has won the “I Love My Librarian” award from the Carnegie Institution and The New York Times and was honored at the White House with a National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award.” (via Inside Bay Area)

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Library officials met with blunt questions, cautious support at Brooklyn Heights meeting

“Brooklyn Public Library officials and developers were upbeat at a Monday night meeting that provided some new details on the plan to sell and develop the Brooklyn Heights library branch. A number of local residents expressed scathing criticism of the plan, however, and urged the library and its Community Advisory Committee (CAC) to consider the impact of yet another residential tower on Brooklyn Heights’ already-overcrowded elementary school, P.S. 8.” (via Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

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COLLEGE ‘REDISCOVERS’ COLLECTION OF RARE GREEK, ROMAN COINS

“A priceless cache of ancient Greek and Roman coins that had become a kind of buried treasure has been “rediscovered” at the University at Buffalo, which had paid little attention to the coins since they were donated in 1935. The collection of 55 gold and silver coins date as far back as the fifth century B.C. Among them are a dozen gold coins from Rome – one each from the eras of Julius Caesar and the 11 emperors who followed him.” (via The Associated Press)

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Clean Reader app removes profanity from e-books

“An app that lets users choose how much profanity they want to let into their reading experience has acquired users in 70 countries, and plenty of reactions along the way. With Clean Reader, users have the choice of how they wish the text of their books to display — Clean (no F-words or the like), Cleaner, Squeaky Clean, or Off, to see it in its original form. Words in question are replaced by a blue dot that can be tapped to view a suggested substitution.” (via Canoe)

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Groundbreaking research in schools and workplaces will marry information competencies with citizenship and employability

“The Information Literacy Group of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) have announced the funding of two contemporary research projects examining how good information skills, or information literacy, can help develop participation in democracy among schoolchildren and enhance employability and performance among the workforce. Dr Geoff Walton, Lecturer in Information Sciences at Northumbria University and CILIP Information Literacy Group Committee member said: “These projects will bring tangible evidence of the social and economic opportunities of properly understanding and embedding information literacy, demonstrating the practices and competencies that work to support individual participation in society and employability in the digital age.” (via CILIP)

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Wikipedia to file lawsuit challenging mass surveillance by NSA

“Wikimedia Foundation, the nonprofit organization that runs free online encyclopedia Wikipedia, will file a lawsuit against the National Security Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice, challenging the government’s mass surveillance program. The lawsuit, to be filed on Tuesday, alleges that the NSA’s mass surveillance of Internet traffic in the United States — often called Upstream surveillance — violates the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment, which protects freedom of speech and association, and the Fourth Amendment, which protects against unreasonable search and seizure.” (via Reuters)

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NTT Data gives Vatican library treasures online showing

“A niche Japanese technology is behind a project to unleash online — for free with a click of the mouse — a rich collection of precious manuscripts and drawings tucked deep inside the nearly 600-year-old Vatican Apostolic Library. The papal library, which holds cultural documents such as notes by Michelangelo and Galileo, is at the forefront of a high-tech experiment to marry its ancient texts with digital technology, with the help of Japanese IT services group NTT Data.” (via FT.com)

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Ramen noodles make library’s Food for Fines fail list

“Ramen noodles might be adequate enough to feed hungry college students and folks on a budget, but the square-block packages don’t hold up well in food drives. Which is why the Salem Public Library, in announcing its annual Food for Fines amnesty promotion next month, put ramen noodles on the list of unacceptable foods. Library administrator BJ Toewe said the library follows the recommendations of the Marion-Polk Food Share food bank, the beneficiary of the library’s food drive.” (via Statesman Journal)

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Unequal shelves in D.C. school libraries benefit wealthier students

“Lafayette Elementary School, in upper Northwest Washington, has one of the largest library collections in the District’s public school system, with more than 28,000 books filling stacks on two floors. Drew Elementary, 12 miles away and east of the Anacostia River, has one of the city’s smallest inventories: 300 catalogued books lining shelves along two of the library’s walls. Reading and literacy are high priorities for the urban school district, as proficiency rates for its poorest students dwell below the averages for major cities. But the District dedicates no annual funding for school-library collections, instead relying on the largesse of parents or the kindness of strangers to stock its shelves through donations.” As a result, an unequal system has developed. (via The Washington Post)

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