Archive | News RSS feed for this section

Newly renovated BPL central library unveiled

“A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held Saturday to open the Boston Public Library’s newly renovated central library. The library’s first floor now features special new areas for children and teenagers. “It shows our commitment to the youth of the city, of the future, and how we’re going to help them grow, learn and expand their opportunities,” said Mayor Marty Walsh, who was on hand for the ribbon cutting.” (via WHDH-TV)

Leave a Comment

Someone is Trying to Save You From Awful Books at the Boston Public Library

“February is Library Lovers’ Month, a time of year when you would expect bookworms to cuddle up in warmly lit bookstack nooks and whisper (literally whisper, this is the library we’re talking about) sweet nothings into the pages of their beloved novels. But those who visit the Boston Public Library’s “BiblioCommons” portal, which hosts user-generated reviews and reading lists by Boston Public Library members, might spot someone who appears to be a “hater” amongst all of the lovers. A user who goes by the name “noluckboston,” has used BiblioCommons to tag 74 books in the Boston Public Library system as “awful library book.” The tag “awful library book” is featured amongst some more typical categories to classify books, such as “suspense,” “romance,” and “fiction,” in the site’s “recent tags” box.” (via Boston.com)

Leave a Comment

Howard University Fills in Wikipedia’s Gaps in Black History

“Wikipedia is a vast ocean of erudition, with entries on virtually every subject, obscure to earth-shattering, and, it may seem, every human being of even vague renown. It is also, its leaders concede, very white. “The stereotype of a Wikipedia editor is a 30-year-old white man, and so most of the articles written are about stuff that interests 30-year-old white men,” said James Hare, president of Wikimedia D.C., the local branch of the foundation that runs Wikipedia. “So a lot of black history is left out.” (via NYTimes.com)

Leave a Comment

Traveling librarians promote literacy throughout Salt Lake City

“Since 2011, local librarian Liesl Johnson has been fighting in the trenches of early childhood literacy. “In order to really bolster early literacy in our community, we needed to do more than just provide resources and programs within our walls,” said Johnson, who serves as the Salt Lake City Public Library System’s director of children and family services. “We needed to go out into the community.” (via Deseret News)

Leave a Comment

OBAMA GETS UPDATE ON SEARCH FOR PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY SITE

“President Barack Obama is getting an update about the competition to pick a site for his future presidential library. Obama stopped by his family’s home on Chicago’s South Side while in town to designate a national monument and campaign for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s re-election.” (via The Associated Press)

Leave a Comment

New IMLS Data Catalog Enables Creative Use of Library, Museum, Administrative Datasets

“The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) announces the launch of data.imls.gov, its open data catalog site. This new resource puts IMLS data—comprising agency data such as grants administration and data about museums, libraries, and related organizations—at the fingertips of researchers, developers, and interested members of the public who want to dig deeper.” (via IMLS)

Leave a Comment

Millburn High School librarian juggles print, digital offerings

“With 30,000 print titles and 20,000 digital titles at the Millburn High School library, students and staff need some guidance.Enter high school librarian LaDawna Harrington.At Millburn High School, she has been guiding students and staff through the library’s vast collection, which she has worked to increase during her five years with the district.A part-time lecturer on library management at Rutgers’ School of Communication and Information, Harrington previously worked as a school librarian in Woodbridge Township and through the years has seen the library sciences grow by leaps and bounds since the days she had just a dialup modem in Woodbridge.” (via NorthJersey.com)

Leave a Comment

British Library Expanding Its Endangered Archives Online

“At a moment when libraries and archives in the Middle East face threats of damage and destruction from war and ideology, the British Library has announced that it has now made four million images from its Endangered Archives program available online. The initiative, established in 2004 and supported by the Arcadia Fund, has so far financed 246 projects in 78 countries, attempting to preserve manuscripts, records, newspapers, photographs, sound archives and even rock inscriptions that are at risk of loss or deterioration.” (via NYTimes.com)

Leave a Comment

EBSCO Information Services Expands eBook Offerings with 27 New Subject Sets

“EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) continues to enhance its collection of eBook titles by releasing 27 new EBSCO eBooks™ Subject Sets. These sets provide libraries with convenient ways to begin or expand their eBook collections with current, reputable content from leading publishers. EBSCO eBook Subject Sets are convenient, prepackaged sets of titles chosen to meet libraries’ needs for new content on popular, in-demand topics. EBSCO’s Collection Development Team of librarians uses tailored knowledge to create these Subject Sets for libraries. All Subject Sets from EBSCO include titles published within the past two years, and have no title duplication among current or past Subject Set offerings.” (via EBSCO)

Leave a Comment

In Haiti, a library with no books transforms the way kids learn

“When Rebecca McDonald was helping rebuild Haiti in the aftermath of its 2010 earthquake, the former construction manager witnessed one of the most heartbreaking scenes in the devastated Caribbean nation: In Port-au-Prince, in school after school that she visited, McDonald noticed that children had little or no access to books. The schools were also overflowing with kids in need—70 percent of one school’s student body was made up of former restaveks, a Creole word used to describe Haiti’s child slaves or domestic servants—and most elementary and middle school teachers hadn’t studied beyond the sixth grade.” (via CSMonitor.com)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2015, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.