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[Calgary Public] Library to trim about 300,000 books from collection

“The Calgary Public Library wants to reduce its book stocks by about 300,000 in order to free up more space in the buildings to run programs. The surplus books will be cleared out before the end of the year. They will be sold through a re-seller. Calgary Public Library CEO Bill Ptacek told CBC Radio’s Calgary Eyeopener that part of the motivation for culling the collection is a big change slated for the New Year. “It’s not a well-kept secret that in January the library is going to be free, there’s going to be no charge for cards,” he said.” (via CBC News)

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San Antonio airport installs digital library kiosks for travelers

“The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. The kiosks will allow library patrons to browse the library’s digital media content which can then be checked out and downloaded onto a mobile device for a limited time. Materials can be checked out for three weeks at a time before expiring.” (via San Antonio Business Journal)

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Videos Show Value of Code of Best Practices in Fair Use

“Today, October 21, 2014, ARL released three videos on the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries, a clear and easy-to-use statement of reasonable approaches to fair use of copyrighted material, developed by and for librarians who support academic inquiry and higher education. With generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the new videos capture how the Code has assisted many communities by providing helpful guidance about the scope of best practice when fair use comes into play.” (via ARL)

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ALA responds to Eleventh Circuit Court’s encouraging “fair use” decision in Georgia State University case

“On Friday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit handed down an important decision in Cambridge University Press et al. v. Carl V. Patton et al. concerning the permissible “fair use” of copyrighted works in electronic reserves for academic courses. Although publisher’s sought to bar the uncompensated excerpting of copyrighted material for “e-reserves,” the court rejected all such arguments and provided new guidance in the Eleventh Circuit for how “fair use” determinations by educators and librarians should best be made. Remanding to the lower court for further proceedings, the court ruled that fair use decisions should be based on a flexible, case-by-case analysis of the four factors of fair use rather than rigid “checklists” or “percentage-based” formulae.” (via ALA)

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Vatican Library Making 4,000 Ancient Manuscripts Available Online For Free

“The Vatican Apostolic Library is now digitising its valuable ancient religious manuscripts and putting them online via its website, available for the public to view for free, as well as turning to crowdfunding to help it complete its work. The Vatican Library was founded in 1451 AD and holds over 80,000 manuscripts, prints, drawings, plates and incunabula (books printed prior to 1500 AD) written throughout history by people of different faiths from across the world.

via IBT)

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UNC libraries to open three research hubs

“After months of renovations, the second floor of Davis Library is open for research. Davis Library is one of three University libraries that hosts a research hub, which Judy Panitch, director of library communications, said will be the ideal place for students to perform cutting-edge research. “(The Research Hub) is serving as kind of a point for campus researchers for trying new technology,” said Joe Williams, director of public services for UNC libraries. On Thursday, Davis will host a grand opening event, which will be hands-on and give students the opportunity to use 3-D printers that are being brought over from the Kenan Science Library Research Huband take pictures in front of the Eiffel Tower and Mount Everest using the Liquid Galaxy.” (via The Daily Tar Heel)

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LexisNexis Acquires Moreover Technologies

“LexisNexis® Legal & Professional, a leading provider of content and technology solutions, today announced that it has acquired Moreover Technologies, Inc., a leading global content delivery service and provider of consolidated current awareness and media management solutions. Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed. News monitoring and distribution is a large and growing global market segment. It offers corporations, law firms and government institutions content and analytical tools to aggregate, monitor and analyze large volumes of news, legal and social media data to help them understand key market trends. It also highlights how their organizations are perceived, the actions of competitors and suppliers, changes to political, legal and regulatory landscape, and other events that could impact them or their clients.” (via Lexis-Nexis)

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Librarians Are Dedicated to User Privacy. The Tech They Have to Use Is Not.

“Adobe has made it extremely easy for unwanted eyes to read over the shoulders of library patrons. Earlier this month reports surfaced about how Adobe’s Digital Editions e-book software collects and transmits information about readers in plain text.* That insecure transmission allows the government, corporations, or potential hackers to intercept information about patron reading habits, including book title, author, publisher, subject, description, and every page read. But the Adobe scandal is just the tip of the iceberg. Libraries sign contracts with technology companies to bring services to patrons all the time, and those contracts are not always favorable to library patrons. Whether it’s an agreement with an ISP to provide the library with Internet access, the publisher of a database of scholarly articles and primary source documents, or a children’s educational game vendor, these contracts are both commonplace and a relatively new development.” (via Slate.)

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Designing libraries that are relevant in the digital age

“With the huge amounts of information now available online, we take a look at how libraries are designing for the 21st century.cEven though it’s still weeks from opening, the new Halifax Central Library is getting lots of attention. And not just because of its 57 million dollar cost. It’s earned international attention as one of the top buildings of 2014. It’s been years since a library of this size and importance was built in Canada. And perhaps… it’s no wonder. Much of the world’s knowledge has moved on to the internet. Books have shed their covers–and even their paper–as they slip onto e-readers.” (via CBC Radio)

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U’s Middle East Library is Home to “Enthusiastic” Librarian

“This library, as one hears from others, is extraordinary,” said Leonard Chiarelli, associate librarian at the Marriott Library. Chiarelli is in charge of the Aziz S. Atiya Middle East Library, one of the most respected centers for research in Middle East studies. Raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., Chiarelli earned a bachelor’s degree in history at Pace University in Manhattan. While an undergraduate, he resolved to come to the U to study at the suggestion of Philip Hitti, whom he had met during a lecture in Manhattan. Chiarelli wanted to study the Mediterranean region during the Medieval period, which was controlled by Arabs at the time. Hitti told Chiarelli that no one in the east knew about that specific subject and referred him to Aziz S. Atiya, who was at the U at the time.” (via The Daily Utah Chronicle)

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