Archive | News RSS feed for this section

Amazon Plans Hundreds of Brick-and-Mortar Bookstores, Mall CEO Says

“After dipping its toes into brick-and-mortar retailing last year with its first physical bookstore, online giant Amazon.com Inc. is poised to dive into the deep end. The Seattle company plans to open as many as 400 bookstores, Sandeep Mathrani, chief executive of mall operator General Growth Properties Inc., said on an earnings call on Tuesday. “You’ve got Amazon opening brick-and-mortar bookstores and their goal is to open, as I understand, 300 to 400,” said Mr. Mathrani in response to a question about mall traffic.” (via WSJ)

Leave a Comment

Bringing books back to life: NEH, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation award $95,000 grant to UNT Libraries

“The University of North Texas Libraries is working to bring more than 100 out-of-print books back to life. Thanks to a $95,599 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor under the new Humanities Open Book Program, the UNT Libraries will digitize 146 books and make those available for free as e-books.” (via University of North Texas)

Leave a Comment

A handy sign that a local government is shirking its public duty: privatizing the library

“The list of responsibilities that a local government must shoulder isn’t an especially long one. Typically it includes keeping the streets paved and the streetlights lit, maintaining adequate police and fire services, inspecting buildings, sometimes providing water. One hallmark of almost every local jurisdiction is the free public library. So the proposal before the Kern County supervisors to turn over the county library system to a private company operating out of suburban Maryland marks a major step. If you’re looking for a sign that local political leaders are intent on giving up all pretense of working for the public interest, look no further. (via LA Times)

Leave a Comment

This Library System Is Willing to Forgive Your Fine…Just This Once 

“If you’ve ever failed to return a library book, you’re not alone—even George Washington was a library scofflaw. And if you live in Los Angeles, you can return your books without fear of a fine for the next two weeks, regardless of how long you’ve had them checked out. It’s all part of an increasing trend of library amnesty programs aimed at welcoming forgetful or unlucky patrons back into the fold. The Los Angeles Public Library’s amnesty period, which lasts from February 1 through February 14, is as much an attempt to regain lost patrons as lost books. “Nothing can keep us apart, not even late fees,” announces the library on its website, in a Valentine’s Day-tinged message about its amnesty program.” (via Smithsonian)

Leave a Comment

Erasmus University Rotterdam selects OCLC WorldShare Management Services

“Erasmus University Rotterdam, one of the largest universities in the Netherlands with over 24,000 students and a research community of approximately 1,400 scientists, has selected OCLC WorldShare Management Services as its library management system.” (via OCLC)

Leave a Comment

Follett, EBSCO Announce eBook Partnership

“Follett announced it is partnering with EBSCO Information Services to make approximately 600,000 EBSCO-hosted eBooks available for ordering through Titlewave, Follett’s premier collection development and order platform for K-12 schools. EBSCO offers high-quality eBooks from more than 1,500 major publishers, including eBooks from more than 115 worldwide university presses. The Follett-EBSCO partnership provides schools with the flexibility to purchase EBSCO eBooks™ on Titlewave, a platform already integral to their workflow, and provides an easy, cost-effective way for libraries to provide educators with full-text EBSCO eBooks coverage to support their curricula.” (via EBSCO)

Leave a Comment

Future of Oyez Supreme Court Archive Hangs in the Balance

“For Sale: 61 years of Supreme Court oral arguments, including audio, transcripts and a suite of multimedia tools.It’s not on Craigslist yet, but Jerry Goldman says options are narrowing for Oyez.org, the private online archive of Supreme Court materials he has been building since the early 1990s and providing free to the public. Mr. Goldman, 70 years old, retires from teaching in May, and when he goes so does Oyez, currently hosted at Chicago-Kent College of Law.The project, which has two full-time staff members and several student employees, costs between $300,000 and $500,000 annually to operate, he says.” (WSJ)

Leave a Comment

How Snead bookshelves made America’s biggest libraries possible.

“Before the early 20th century, public libraries typically used wooden bookcases with fixed shelves to house their volumes. In the 1910s, new public literacy initiatives like Andrew Carnegie’s library-building projects, as well as institutional expansions at the Library of Congress and many universities, drove the need for a different kind of library shelf. The new wave of libraries—bigger and more comprehensive than their predecessors—needed bookshelves that could accommodate their rapidly growing collections of books. The New York Public Library, for example, installed 75 miles of new bookshelves in 1910 in preparation of its grand opening the next year. And the shelves from earlier decades simply weren’t going to cut it.So where were these new libraries going to get bookshelves that were up to the challenge?”( via Slate)

Leave a Comment

Library of Congress to Digitize PBS NewsHour Collection

“If you’ve missed out on the past 30 years of PBS NewsHour you’re in luck, 32 years of broadcasts will be persevered and available online through the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The Library of Congress, public media producer WGBH and WETA, Washington D.C., will handle the digitization of PBS NewsHour programs from 1975 to 2007. Funding for the endeavor is coming from the Council on Library and Information Resources.” (via TV Technology)

Leave a Comment

UNIVERSITY TRIES TO SECURE LIBRARY AFTER MULTIPLE ROBBERIES

The president of Georgia State University says the library on its main campus in downtown Atlanta will be temporarily closed to the public to install new security measures after a series of robberies inside the library.Georgia State President Mark Becker said in a statement that security cameras will also be added at the library and more police will patrol campus.” (via The Associated Press)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2016, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.