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D.C. adds a social worker to library system to work with homeless patrons

“Among the many roles for which public libraries are appreciated, there’s one that can be problematic: de facto day shelter for homeless people. Downtown’s Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library attracts many such patrons, and Jean Badalamenti understands why. “The city drops folks from three shelters off here every morning and picks them up in the evening. So they come here because of that,” said Badalamenti, a social worker who in May became the D.C. Public Library’s first health and human services coordinator.” (via The Washington Post)

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Rocky Mountain Gun Owners vs. small town library?

“It’s shaping up to be a small town showdown straight out of an old West tale: gun-rights group Rocky Mountain Gun Owners is threatening to wage a legal battle on its own turf against the Clearview Library District in Windsor, where RMGO is also based.The dust-up was spurred when librarians asked mother Erika Sattler to leave the Windsor-Severance Library after another patron noticed Sattler’s concealed handgun. Librarians apparently advised Sattler that guns are prohibited at the library unless being carried by law enforcement. Sattler gathered up her children and departed, but while she may have lost the battle RMGO has rallied to help her win the war.” (via The Colorado Independent)

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A Brooklyn Librarian Will Now Make You a Personalized Reading List, and You Don’t Even Have to Put on Pants

“This has been, without a doubt, an excellent summer for New York’s libraries. In Manhattan, the Stephen A. Schwartzman branch set up a beautiful outdoor reading room that was open for the past two weeks before closing on the 22nd. A group of seafaring booklovers announced that they’ll launch a floating library aboard the Lilac Museum Steamship for a month come September. And now, in a less temporary and totally genius move, a group of hardworking librarians across the Brooklyn Public Library system will make you a personalized reading list. You don’t have to leave the house, dress yourself, or talk to another human being to put in a request for one. The future is here, and it is glorious.” (via Village Voice)

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Vancouver’s main library to undergo major reorganization

“Vancouver’s downtown library — a nine-storey “Colosseum” that holds 1.3 million items and covers a full block at Georgia and Homer — is approaching its 20th anniversary, and with that will come some significant changes. The downtown branch, which is known as the Central Library, is being rearranged to make it easier for people to find books, as well as to create space for a new Inspiration Lab.” (via Vancouver Sun)

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George Washington U. clarifies ‘no alternative textbook vendor’ guidelines

“Faculty members at George Washington University are once again free to tell students they can save money by buying their textbooks online, after the university initially urged professors to stop pointing students to sources other than the campus bookstore. In a letter dated July 17, the university reminded faculty members of its “contractual obligation” with Follett, which runs the campus bookstore. Since the company has the “exclusive right” to provide textbooks and other course materials for all of the university’s courses, “alternative vendors may not be endorsed, licensed or otherwise approved or supported by the university or its faculty.” (via insidehighered)

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Dallas’ Libraries, Among the Nation’s Worst Funded, May Actually Get Some More Moneyr

“On Wednesday, book lovers from across the city showed up in force at the Dallas City Council meeting. It was the first time council members were able to throw amendments at the proposed city budget for the next fiscal year. And supporters of Dallas Public Libraries wanted them to carefully consider the library budget in their decision-making. After half a decade of budget cuts, Dallas’ library system has some of the most limited operation hours of any city library system in the country. It catching up to do if it is to restore competitive hours — that is, more than 40 hours per week — and standard facility operations. This last fiscal year, the City of Dallas spent $18.29 per person on its libraries. Houston spent $18.26. Houston’s is the worst funded library system in the country. Dallas’ is the second-worst.” (via Dallas Observer)

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Pastor wants ‘demonic’ books removed from public library in Cleveland

“A Cleveland pastor wants what he calls “demonic” books pulled from the shelves of the public library. Pastor Phillip Missick of King of Saints Tabernacle, a Messianic church, filed a complaint with Austin Memorial Library, Cleveland’s public library, asking that many fiction books on vampires, demons and the supernatural be purged. He says he was stunned to find the young adult section full of books like “Blood Promise,” “Twilight,” and the “Vampire Knight” series. “This is dark. There’s a sexual element. You have creatures that aren’t human. I think it’s dangerous for our kids,” said Missick.” (via abc13.com)

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Chicagoans Divided on Using Tax Money to Attract Obama Library

“As President Barack Obama’s foundation reviews locations for his library and museum — Chicago is the unofficial frontrunner. But voters in his adopted hometown are divided over whether to use taxpayer dollars to help the Windy City secure and build the future tourist trap. The Chicago Tribune polled Chicagoans on the issue and found reactions split nearly down the middle, with 47 supporting the idea, 45 percent against it and 8 percent undecided. The divide was greater among black poll-takers (61 percent of whom were in favor) and whites surveyed (60 percent were in opposition). Younger voters were more supportive than older voters. Men broke even, 48-48, and women supported the tax question, 47-43.” (via NBC Chicago)

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Bill Clinton library plans 10th anniversary event

“The presidential library honoring Bill Clinton in Little Rock, Arkansas, is planning for a major event in November to honor its tenth anniversary, sources familiar with the planning said Thursday. The event is expected to fall on Nov. 14, according to emails circulating among potential attendees. That’s four days before the anniversary of the Nov. 18, 2004, unveiling. It was not immediately clear if the event would be limited to one day.” (via POLITICO.com)

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Jane Austen Artifacts at the Morgan Library and in England

“Likenesses of Jane Austen, as well as objects that passed through her family’s hands, are emerging from storage with fanfare and traveling widely. In the past year, Austen heirlooms on the move have included a tiny 1869 watercolor portrait, which sold to a private collector for $270,000 at Sotheby’s in London, and a turquoise ring owned by Austen, which Jane Austen’s House Museum in Chawton, England, bought from the singer Kelly Clarkson for about $250,000.” (via NYTimes.com)

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