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ALA supports Nebraska efforts to fight legislation impacting library boards

“ALA President Sari Feldman, working in conjunction with the Nebraska Library Association, has issued a letter opposing Legislative Bill 969, a bill that would compel cities and towns throughout Nebraska to change their library boards from independent governing bodies to advisory boards. The letter was distributed to the General Affairs Committee of the Nebraska Legislature, State Senator Heath Mello and Speaker of the Legislature Galen Hadley.” (via ALA)

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High Court Last Hope for Copyright Lawsuit Over Google Book Scanning

“The long-running copyright dispute between the Authors Guild and Google could be reaching a final chapter in coming weeks as both sides wait to see if the Supreme Court takes up the case.The litigation over Google’s digital book library stretches back to 2005, when the nation’s largest professional organization for writers filed a federal lawsuit accusing Google of “massive copyright infringement.” (via WSJ)

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Pullman Porter Museum to launch online registry of black railroad laborers

“Theodore Berrien worked as a Pullman porter from about 1940 to 1969, during which time he was chosen to accompany President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s funeral train on its route between Georgia and Washington, D.C.”He spoke of how kind Mrs. Roosevelt was and thanked him for his services during the trip,” his grandson recalled in a new searchable online registry of African-American railroad laborers.This entry — and thousands of others — have been recorded in the registry that will be launched by the A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum, with help from DePaul University, this week. Descendants and scholars will be able to preserve oral histories on the website that otherwise might be lost.”(via Chicago Tribune)

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Geological Society joins forces with ReadCube

“Earth science publisher the Geological Society of London (GSL) has partnered with Boston-based publishing technology company ReadCube to index the society’s scholarly journals and books with ReadCube’s Discover service.More than 20,000 articles are now searchable across ReadCube’s web, desktop, and mobile reading portals and also included in ReadCube’s search engines, related article feeds and recommendation engine.” (via Research Information)

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Total Open Access: the new gospel of scientific communication

“Scientific communication has evidently hit a brick wall. A growing number of scientists are publishing an increasing number of results and findings from research all over the world. Never before has the output from scientific publications been so great.As some publishers of journals exploit their market position and pitch subscription prices as if they hold the monopoly, however, many libraries are no longer able to afford these publications. In the so-called journal crisis, which began around 15 years ago, the mounting calls among librarians for free access to scientific information mirrored the soaring subscription fees.” (via Research Information)

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‘Master of the River’: A 71-year-old librarian’s 15 years of water commutes

“It’s dawn when Gabriel Horchler climbs into his 21-foot Vespoli rowing shell at Bladensburg Waterfront Park and begins drifting downriver on the Anacostia. From the banks, one would see only a candy-apple-red sliver gliding on the water, framed by dense trees arching over the riverbanks. Here Horchler sits, as he does on so many mornings, admiring the sunrise, his arms moving in ­machine-like motion, oars slicing the glassy water in a smooth, uninterrupted rhythm.” (via The Washington Post)

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Whitehall library selling digital copies of yearbooks dating back to 1920s

“When David Janders moved back to the Lehigh Valley after 40 years in the Arizona desert, he was looking for a way to reconnect with old friends and acquaintances.Janders tried digging up his 1968 Whitehall High School yearbook, but soon realized that an older sibling must have tossed it out even before he left for Arizona.He checked online for a replacement and was shocked by the steep prices they were fetching.” (via The Morning Call)

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MIT Libraries supporting Open Library of Humanities

“The MIT Libraries have joined the Open Library of Humanities’ (OLH), an academic-led, all open access publisher of humanities journals. The platform, which has funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, covers its costs by payments from an international library consortium, rather than any kind of author fee. The platform hosts peer-reviewed open access journals in the humanities, as well as OLH’s own multidisciplinary open access journal.” (via MIT Libraries News)

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Google’s New Interactive E-Books Would Be Impossible to Print

“There was a moment when e-books felt a little bit magical. A single device that stores hundreds of books, fits in a tote, and doesn’t give paper cuts? Clearly, this was an upgrade to the tattered paper books we’d been reading for hundreds of years. Then, some years and a few generations of Kindle later, digital books began to feel less like magic and more like pixelated versions of what’s already on our shelves. Being digital didn’t necessarily add anything to the reading experience. In fact, it was physical books that seemed to be pushing the boundaries of publishing.” (via Wired)

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National Library of Medicine Announces MedPix®, Free Online Medical Image Database

“The National Library of Medicine is pleased to announce the launch of MedPix®, a free online medical image database originally developed by the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at the Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. The URL is https://medpix.nlm.nih.gov/. The foundation for MedPix was a radiology study tool that was originally developed by Dr. J.G. Smirniotopoulos in 1984.” (via National Library of Medicine)

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