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Libraries could outlast the internet, head of British Library says

“Stop worrying about whether libraries will survive the digital age, the head of the British Library has said, as he argues that they could outlast the internet. Roly Keating, director of the British Library, said he was shocked at how many “smart people” still questioned whether libraries were still viable in the modern age. Saying the institution had countless values worth defending, including trust, he argued that libraries could prove the most “powerful and resiliant network yet”. “These values predated the internet,” he said. “And if we get it right may yet outlast it.” (via Telegraph)

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Small-town libraries struggle to stay open when funding is short

“In 1991, when the Lawrence County Library System wanted to add two branch locations, Lynn wasn’t originally considered. The remote farming town of 282 is 15 miles down a winding stretch of Arkansas 25 from Powhatan. Its largest employers are a farm-services company and the small Hillcrest School District, which is about 6 miles south. Library system administrators didn’t think a branch would fare well in the town. But overwhelming support from the town’s residents brought a branch library to the southwestern Lawrence County community, and the Driftwood Library — named for a long-ago community near the Strawberry River — has thrived since.” (via NWA Online)

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Ferguson librarian finds himself in national spotlight

“One month after Scott Bonner stepped into his role as director of the Ferguson Municipal Public Library, Michael Brown was fatally shot. Bonner, 43, turned the library into a refuge as civil unrest erupted around it. Now Bonner is receiving grants from the state of Missouri and private foundations, as well as donations of books from authors across the globe.” (via St. Louis Business Journal)

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Vancouver Public Library’s Central Branch celebrates 20 years

“This Tuesday marks 20 years since Vancouver Public Library’s Central Branch on Robson and Hamilton streets opened its doors to the public. “[It’s] really a testament to the city’s interest in investing in its residents and lifelong learning,” said Sandra Singh, chief librarian at the Vancouver Public Library. Prior to 1995, the city’s main library was located on Robson and Burrard streets. That location is now the home of lingerie store Victoria’s Secret. “With the growth that was projected for Vancouver, there was no way [the old location] could continue to serve as the central library,” said Singh.” (via CBC)

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‘Simple and Seamless’ or ‘Significant Obstacle’?

“Academic, library and technology organizations are denouncing a new sharing and hosting policy adopted last month by publisher Elsevier, saying it undermines open-access policies at colleges and universities and prevents authors from sharing their work. Elsevier, which publishes thousands of journals, introduced the policy last month. It aims to strike a balance between making sharing “simple and seamless” and “being consistent with access and usage rights associated with journal articles,” the publisher said in a blog post.” (via Chronicle)

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Andreessens pair with H-P to send computers to Ferguson, Baltimore libraries

“Public libraries that provided a quiet refuge from civil unrest in Ferguson, Mo., and Baltimore are about to receive a small bounty from Silicon Valley. Venture capitalist Marc Andreessen and his wife, philanthropist and educator Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen, have teamed up with Hewlett-Packard to donate nearly $170,000 worth of computers, printers and other equipment. The couple says they were moved by the “individual acts of heroism” of library staffers who kept the doors open to the public even as protests raged over police brutality and the deaths of young black men.” (via USA Today)

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ALAMEDA COUNTY LIBRARY BOARD FINDS ALTERNATIVE TO TRASHING BOOKS

Public pressure is forcing the Alameda County Library system to stop throwing away thousands of books it deemed unusable. ABC7 News first reported this story back in February and our Facebook post on it got attention nationwide, with more than 76,000 people sharing this story with their Facebook friends. Some of the books thrown out were only three years old, but library officials say many of them simply weren’t being read so they had to be dumped. At a meeting Wednesday evening, the library advisory board decided it was a good idea to contract Discover Books — a non-profit that collects, resells or gives away the material. Regardless, book enthusiasts are still upset that an estimated 172,000 items were dumped in the trash.” (via ABC7News)

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Alma library bans e-cigarettes, companion pets

“The Alma Public Library is taking some proactive steps by banning two things from its building: e-cigarettes and companion pets. Both items, which are sort of “signs of our time” have in recent months brought up questions for both patrons and employees. Bryan Dinwoody, the director and librarian for the library said that as far as e-cigarettes were concerned, the board thought it best to be consistent. “We had some people asking if they could use (e-cigarettes) in the library, and it brought up a lot of issues as far as regulations,” he said. “There’s still a cloud produced; some people are sensitive to smells. It’s just not good for a public building.” (via The Morning Sun)

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hoopla digital Introduces Dynamic eBooks and Comics Experience

“Hoopla digital (hoopladigital.com), the category-creating mobile and online service for public libraries, today announced the rollout of its new eBooks and Comics offering to its library customers and their patrons in the U.S. and Canada. With thousands of titles at launch, hoopla’s eBooks and Comics selection features works across genres – from children’s books and comics to biographies and self-help – from publishers such as RosettaBooks, Chicago Review Press, Dundurn Press and Tyndale House Publishers. The eBooks and Comics content joins hoopla digital’s catalog of more than 300,000 movies, TV shows, music albums and audiobooks.” (via PR Newswire)

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Art is reported missing at Boston Public Library

“Police are investigating the disappearance of two works of art worth more than $600,000, including a print of a Rembrandt self-portrait, that went missing last month from the Boston Public Library’s flagship branch in Copley Square, authorities said Tuesday. A report from the Boston Police Department’s Anti-Corruption Unit states that officers learned in April that two prints, the one by Rembrandt and an Adam and Eve etching by Albrecht Dürer, were missing. The Dürer piece was valued at over $600,000, and the Rembrandt was worth between $20,000 and $30,000, according to police and library officials.” (via Boston Globe)

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