Archive | News RSS feed for this section

Turning the page: Library district emerges stronger after years of cost reduction

“Las Vegas-Clark County Library District Executive Director Dr. Ronald R. Heezen said half of the district’s employees who were laid off due to the 2008 recession have been rehired. And increased staffing isn’t the only bright spot in the district’s future: He said the libraries are now in a financial position to better meet the community’s needs. “Years of cost reduction, expenditure management and personnel cost containment have paid off for the district,”? he said in a press release. “We are now in a position to build its capacity to meet community needs, while maintaining a prudent ending fund balance.” The district’s Board of Trustees adopted the fiscal year 2015-16 budget —?? effective July 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016 — at its May 21 board meeting. The budget’??s general operating fund is $59.5 million.” (via Las Vegas Review Journal)

Leave a Comment

How the NY Public Library Crowdsources Digital Innovation

“Like most public institutions, the New York Public Library is chronically underfunded. However, shoestring staffing has not slowed the breakneck pace at which NYPL Labs releases new digital projects. NYPL Labs offers a model for public institutions around the country: Trust your patrons. Thanks to shrewd application of crowdsourcing initiatives, NYPL Labs has produced innovative online projects ranging from maps to menus.” (via PC Magazine)

Leave a Comment

With 10,699 books printed, Windsor library’s self-publishing machine is a hit

“Sue Perry likens her role at the Windsor Public Library to that of a midwife. Perry runs the main library’s self-publishing Espresso Book Machine which has produced 10,699 books in three years and she hopes to be even busier delivering professionally-bound paperback books into the hands of local authors. Windsor was the first public library in Canada to install such a machine in 2012 so it wasn’t clear how well it would be received. Three years later, the service isn’t a money-maker but its growing popularity and a proposed fee increase could help it break even.” (via Windsor Star)

Leave a Comment

Booktrack Attracts $5 Million in Funding

“Booktrack, an e-publishing venture offering publishers the ability to add customizable soundtracks to digital titles, has secured $5 million in funding led by investments from COENT Venture Partners and Sparkbox Ventures. The new round of funding comes on the heels of $3 million in financing raised by Booktrack last year. The company plans to use the new funding to support recent overall growth, acquire more book content and support direct to consumer sales of Booktrack titles via its e-book store.” (via Publishers Weekly)

Leave a Comment

The calamity of disappearing school libraries

“From coast to coast, elementary and high school libraries are being neglected, defunded, repurposed, abandoned and closed. The kindest thing that can be said about this is that it’s curious; the more accurate explanation is that it’s just wrong and very foolish. A 2011 survey conducted with my graduate students of 25 separate statewide studies shows that students who attend schools with libraries that are staffed by certified librarians score better on reading and writing tests than students in schools without library services. And it is lower-income students who benefit the most.” (via Houston Chronicle)

Leave a Comment

N.Y.U. Library Acquires Archive of the Digital Art Journal Triple Canopy

“When libraries acquire the archives of an art and literary magazine, they usually do so after a magazine has been around for decades and the files arrive by truck, in dusty boxes measured in linear feet. But on Monday, the Fales Library and Special Collection at New York University announced the acquisition of the archive of Triple Canopy, the widely admired New York art and literary journal that has been published only since 2007 and only online (if you don’t count a few old-school print anthologies).” (via NYT)

Leave a Comment

College librarian in China admits he replaced art with fakes

“A former chief librarian at a Chinese university admitted in court Tuesday to stealing more than 140 paintings by grandmasters in a gallery under his watch and replacing them with fakes he painted himself. For two years up until 2006, Xiao Yuan substituted famous works including landscapes and calligraphies in a gallery within the library of the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts.” (via AP)

Leave a Comment

Innovative survey finds online library access ‘most important’

“Innovative has announced the publication of survey results from more than 4,000 library users at seven academic libraries in the UK. ‘We Love the Library, but We Live on the Web’ – which centres around how academic library users view online resources and services – reports on how online users interact with library-related services and what the key challenges are for libraries to meet these expectations. The study found that user behaviours and attitudes are increasingly uniform and that the ‘digital-native’ is no longer a subset of library users. Although most access online library resources in the library, users see access from anywhere – on any device – as the ‘most important’ consideration.” (via Research Information)

Leave a Comment

MUSEUM AT NIXON’S PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY GETS MAKEOVER

“A museum dedicated to Richard Nixon’s presidency is getting a makeover that will include interactive exhibits appealing to younger, tech-savvy visitors, officials said Monday. The galleries at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in California’s Orange County are getting a $25 million upgrade to add more audio and video features and include interactive touchscreens common to most modern museum exhibits.” (Via Associated Press)

Leave a Comment

Petition to ban new books prompts new debate on censorship in Duval County

“Currently, there are 11 literary works that remain off the shelves of Duval County Public School libraries due to past protests from concerned citizens, but Superintendent Nikolai Vitti said adding more works to that list would set a bad precedent. “We are walking up a slippery slope when we start to decide what books we are going to ban from the curriculum,” he said. Yet, this week administrators at Duval County Public Schools received a petition from several citizens protesting the use of two new books added last month to the third-grade reading list: “Nasreen’s Secret School” and “The Librarian of Basra” both said to be based on the true stories from the Middle East.” (via Jacksonville.com)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2015, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.