Archive | News RSS feed for this section

Bill Clinton library plans 10th anniversary event

“The presidential library honoring Bill Clinton in Little Rock, Arkansas, is planning for a major event in November to honor its tenth anniversary, sources familiar with the planning said Thursday. The event is expected to fall on Nov. 14, according to emails circulating among potential attendees. That’s four days before the anniversary of the Nov. 18, 2004, unveiling. It was not immediately clear if the event would be limited to one day.” (via POLITICO.com)

Leave a Comment

Jane Austen Artifacts at the Morgan Library and in England

“Likenesses of Jane Austen, as well as objects that passed through her family’s hands, are emerging from storage with fanfare and traveling widely. In the past year, Austen heirlooms on the move have included a tiny 1869 watercolor portrait, which sold to a private collector for $270,000 at Sotheby’s in London, and a turquoise ring owned by Austen, which Jane Austen’s House Museum in Chawton, England, bought from the singer Kelly Clarkson for about $250,000.” (via NYTimes.com)

Leave a Comment

Wikipedia’s medical errors and one doctor’s fight to correct them

“You can’t always believe what you read on the internet. That is particularly true when it comes to medical information in the crowd-sourced online encyclopedia, Wikipedia. But one doctor is on a mission to change that. Dr. James Heilman works as an emergency room physician in Cranbrook, B.C., and is also a clinical instructor at UBC. He’s just returned from Wikimania, a Wikipedia conference that was held in London this August, where he encouraged his colleagues to help edit and improve the accuracy of medical information found on Wikipedia.”We know Wikipedia isn’t perfect. We know it can be better,” says Heilman.” (via CBC News)

Leave a Comment

Mellon Grant Advances Library Digitization Efforts

“The Washington University Libraries have been awarded a $50,000 grant by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will allow the Libraries to implement Hydra, a powerful open-source software system used by research institutions around the world to provide access to their digital content. Equally important, Hydra facilitates collaboration among institutions that want to share their digital collections and link them to related materials held elsewhere. Over a period of two years, the grant will cover costs for technical skill-building among staff, expanded technological infrastructure, and internal and external outreach as well as interaction with the wider community of Hydra users and developers. Such efforts expand on technical resources already in place at the Libraries. This is essential as more and more materials are being delivered online and as the number of faculty-driven humanities projects grows.” (via Washington University)

Leave a Comment

Hint of Scandal Embroils Queens Library’s Leaders

“There it is atop the Queens Public Library’s headquarters: The roof deck at the heart of an inquiry into misused money, where some say the president of the library, Thomas W. Galante, likes to take cigarette breaks. Four wrought-iron chairs and some low tables are jammed onto a 16-by-14-foot space one flight up from Merrick Boulevard. The shrubs surrounding it are dying. Air-conditioning units rumble behind flimsy latticework erected as a buffer. The view is of the blank exteriors of buildings on either side. “It’s not opulent,” Joanne King, a spokeswoman for the library, said during a tour last week.” (via NYTimes.com)

Leave a Comment

Gardeners on Alert as Pennsylvania Targets Risks of Seed Exchanges

“A crackdown by Pennsylvania regulators on a seed exchange at a small library has put gardeners and advocates of locally grown organic food on alert across the country. In June, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture told a public library in Mechanicsburg, Pa., that it couldn’t distribute homegrown seeds. The agency said a planned seed-exchange program would run afoul of a 2004 state law requiring anyone who distributes seeds to conduct certain quality tests, adhere to labeling and storage rules and acquire a license.” (via WSJ)

Leave a Comment

Panel OKs State Librarian Despite Initial Concerns

“The son of a former California Supreme Court justice won approval Wednesday from a state Senate panel as the new state librarian after initial concerns that he had never worked in the field and had no formal training as a librarian when he was nominated. Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown named Greg Lucas of Sacramento to the $143,000-a-year post in March. State law requires the appointee to be a technically trained librarian, and Lucas said he began taking an online master’s degree library science class this month from San Jose State University.” (via AP)

Leave a Comment

What the ‘death of the library’ means for the future of books

“Forbes contributor Tim Worstall wants us to close public libraries and buy everyone an Amazon Kindle with an unlimited subscription. “Why wouldn’t we simply junk the physical libraries and purchase an Amazon Kindle Unlimited subscription for the entire country?” he asks. Worstall points to substantial savings on public funds, arguing that people would have access to a much larger collection of books through a Kindle Unlimited subscription than they could get through any public library and that the government would spend far less on a bulk subscription for all residents than it ever would on funding libraries. Is he right? Are libraries obsolete? He might be correct — but only if libraries were just about books, which they are not. Libraries are actually an invaluable public and social resource that provide so much more than simple shelves of books (or, for those in rural areas, a Bookmobile like the one this author grew up with). A world without public libraries is a grim one indeed, and the assault on public libraries should be viewed as alarming.” (via The Week)

Leave a Comment

Understanding a turbulent world to develop library policy agenda

“Today, the American Library Association (ALA) releases the draft “Trends Report: Snapshots of a Turbulent World” (with Appendix I (pdf) and Appendix II (pdf)) to stimulate discussion about and ultimately inform a national policy agenda for the U.S. library community. A draft policy agenda will be developed for public comment through the Policy Revolution! initiative led by the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) with guidance from its Library Advisory Committee (LAC). “The speed of change related to technology and the linked policy dimensions is breathtaking. Similarly, library roles and demands are evolving, and so the library community’s national policy priorities need to be critically reviewed and realigned accordingly,” said OITP Advisory Committee Chair and LAC Ex Officio Member Dan Lee (via Direct Dispatch)

Leave a Comment

The Academic Book of the Future

“The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the British Library are launching a two-year research project which will explore the future of the academic books in the context of open access publishing and continuing digital change. Dr Samantha Rayner, Director of the Centre for Publishing at the University College London (UCL) will lead the project ‘Communities of Practice: The Academic Book of the Future’. Alongside colleagues Simon Tanner and Professor Marilyn Deegan from King’s College London and Nick Canty from UCL this multi-disciplinary team will engage with the publishing and academic community to better understand the current landscape of academic publishing. A combination of large scale scoping work and more focussed mini-projects will ensure that opinions, approaches and ideas are included from the UK and beyond.” (British Library – Press and Policy Centre)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2014, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.