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Libraries Are Concerned About the Lack of New e-books in the Kindle Format

“Libraries all over the US have expressed concern to Good e-Reader that the vast majority of new e-book titles from Overdrive are not available in the Kindle format.  The few books that have been made available are from small presses and not major publishers.  Is this something to be worried about? Overdrive has the largest market share in facilitating digital e-books, audiobooks and videos to libraries all over the United States. Chances are if your local branch offers digital content, its from Overdrive.  They are also the only company that offers e-books in the Kindle format.” (via GoodEReader)

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Why digital natives prefer reading in print. Yes, you read that right

“Frank Schembari loves books — printed books. He loves how they smell. He loves scribbling in the margins, underlining interesting sentences, folding a page corner to mark his place. Schembari is not a retiree who sips tea at Politics and Prose or some other bookstore. He is 20, a junior at American University, and paging through a thick history of Israel between classes, he is evidence of a peculiar irony of the Internet age: Digital natives prefer reading in print.” (via The Washington Post)

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Springer partners with Copyright Clearance Center

“Springer has partnered with Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) on a new solution enabling corporate life sciences researchers to perform text and data mining (TDM) quickly and easily across publishers. As one of the first publishers to sign onto the service, Springer will offer a significant portion of its full-text article content through the CCC service when launched later this year.” (via Springer)

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In a country like Britain, obsessed with the now, libraries are a political battleground

“Relative to our basic understanding of what a city’s main library ought to provide, it seems mind-boggling: 240,000 works of non-fiction, quietly taken from the shelves, and either given to other institutions or handed to a local company which “buy, recycle and find a second life” for old library stock – a polite formulation for a process that often results in books simply being pulped. The people in charge reckon the breadth and depth of their collection remains “good across all subject areas”, whatever that means. Horrified campaigners say what they have done is “morally reprehensible” (via The Guardian)

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Missoula: State’s busiest library out of shelf, storage space

“Space, funding and parking are three of the issues the Missoula Public Library is looking at in the design and construction of its future home. The library recently put out a request for qualifications for architects to apply to be the firm chosen to design a new complex that will be built at the site of the current library in downtown Missoula. The new building, expected to cost $35 million, will be between 120,000 and 130,000 square feet, compared to the library’s current size of around 42,000 square feet.” (via missoulian.com)

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Berkley or Berkeley? Library scores misspelled buttons

“When two cities have nearly identical names, mix-ups are bound to happen. But for the city of Berkley’s Public Library, a decade-old mistake by a library on the west coast turned into a pretty sweet deal. The Oakland County library received a batch of buttons from the Berkeley Public Library, located in Berkeley, Calif., after the library noticed its order of buttons were misspelled. The buttons say: “I have a library card, Berkley Public Library.” (via Free Press)

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Detroit’s Frederick Douglass Library to get new technology

“If you’re reading this column, then you know how much I love reading and books and libraries — as much as I now love gadgets and iPhones and computers. So it’s great news that the Detroit Public Library, which the economy pummeled into closing two branches in the last three years, is expanding services in one. On Thursday, officials will cut the ribbon in front of the historic Frederick Douglass library to celebrate the new technology center inside. (via Free Press)

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Newly renovated BPL central library unveiled

“A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held Saturday to open the Boston Public Library’s newly renovated central library. The library’s first floor now features special new areas for children and teenagers. “It shows our commitment to the youth of the city, of the future, and how we’re going to help them grow, learn and expand their opportunities,” said Mayor Marty Walsh, who was on hand for the ribbon cutting.” (via WHDH-TV)

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Someone is Trying to Save You From Awful Books at the Boston Public Library

“February is Library Lovers’ Month, a time of year when you would expect bookworms to cuddle up in warmly lit bookstack nooks and whisper (literally whisper, this is the library we’re talking about) sweet nothings into the pages of their beloved novels. But those who visit the Boston Public Library’s “BiblioCommons” portal, which hosts user-generated reviews and reading lists by Boston Public Library members, might spot someone who appears to be a “hater” amongst all of the lovers. A user who goes by the name “noluckboston,” has used BiblioCommons to tag 74 books in the Boston Public Library system as “awful library book.” The tag “awful library book” is featured amongst some more typical categories to classify books, such as “suspense,” “romance,” and “fiction,” in the site’s “recent tags” box.” (via Boston.com)

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Howard University Fills in Wikipedia’s Gaps in Black History

“Wikipedia is a vast ocean of erudition, with entries on virtually every subject, obscure to earth-shattering, and, it may seem, every human being of even vague renown. It is also, its leaders concede, very white. “The stereotype of a Wikipedia editor is a 30-year-old white man, and so most of the articles written are about stuff that interests 30-year-old white men,” said James Hare, president of Wikimedia D.C., the local branch of the foundation that runs Wikipedia. “So a lot of black history is left out.” (via NYTimes.com)

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