Archive | News RSS feed for this section

Who’s reading millions of stolen research papers on the outlaw website Sci-Hub? Now we know.

“The $10 billion world of academic publishing has been roiled in recent months by Alexandra Elbakyan, a 27-year-old grad student from Kazakhstan who set up an online database of 50 million stolen academic research papers for anyone to download for free.Scholars have long denounced a publishing system in which they provide their research for free to companies that sell it at high rates of return. Some view Elbakyan as a modern-day Robin Hood. The publishers say she is simply a criminal, relying on a system that uses stolen passwords to access data.” (via The Washington Post)

Leave a Comment

Commissioners agree to ask for $30 million for new library in Missoula

“Missoula County commissioners wholeheartedly agreed Wednesday to place a $30-million library bond on the November ballot pending a financing agreement with the Missoula Public Library board. If voters say yes, the money will help finance construction of a four-story, 121,000-square-foot library – three times the size of the current building – with underground parking on a full city block.” (via missoulian.com)

Leave a Comment

Video Cameras in Minneapolis Central Library Bathrooms Unsettle Visitors

“You might not expect to walk into a public bathroom and find a camera fixed in the ceiling staring back at you. However, that’s exactly what you will see if you head into a bathroom at the Central Library downtown Minneapolis.    Said Ali says, while studying at the central library, a friend of his went to the bathroom but quickly returned very upset. She told him there was a video camera installed in the ceiling of the ladies bathroom.” (via KSTP)

Leave a Comment

ACRL report shows compelling evidence of library contributions to student learning and success

“A new report issued by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), “Documented Library Contributions to Student Learning and Success: Building Evidence with Team-Based Assessment in Action Campus Projects,” shows compelling evidence for library contributions to student learning and success. The report focuses on dozens of projects conducted as part of the program Assessment in Action: Academic Libraries and Student Success (AiA) by teams that participated in the second year of the program, from April 2014 to June 2015.” (via ALA)

Leave a Comment

Kevin L. Smith arrives on campus as dean of KU Libraries

“Kevin L. Smith, former director of copyright and scholarly communication at Duke University, has joined the University of Kansas as dean for KU Libraries. Smith succeeds interim co-deans Kent Miller and Mary Roach, who assumed their roles following the departure of Dean Lorraine Haricombe. Haricombe was named vice provost and director of libraries at the University of Texas at Austin in 2014. During his tenure at Duke, Smith advised faculty, staff and students on issues of copyright, intellectual property and open access to the Duke community and beyond.” (via University of Kansas)

Leave a Comment

Toronto library workers say they’re heading for strike

“More than 2,000 library workers will strike Monday, shutting Toronto’s 100 branches, unless the city gets serious about negotiating a new contract, their union says.With a strike or lockout possible at midnight Sunday, talks are at a “crisis point,” Maureen O’Reilly, president of CUPE Local 4948, told reporters Wednesday.“I am extremely concerned about the state of negotiations right now,” O’Reilly said, and if they don’t improve library staff will be on picket lines Monday instead of opening branches.” (via Toronto Star)

Leave a Comment

Find, Prioritize, and Recommend: An article recommendation system to fill knowledge gaps across Wikipedia

“The French Wikipedia may have more than 20,000 articles on individual asteroids, but if you are one of 27 million people speaking Hausa as a first language, Wikipedia doesn’t yet have an entry on the universe. The English Wikipedia may have more than 5 million articles on topics as diverse as extreme sports or unusual causes of death, but if English is the only language you speak, there is still little to no content to learn from about vast regions of the world—as the map above suggests.” (via Wikimedia blog)

Leave a Comment

The New England Journal of Medicine Content Now Discoverable through ReadCube

“ReadCube is pleased to announce its agreement with the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the world’s most trusted and influential source of medical knowledge and clinical best practices, to index its content across ReadCube’s platform as a part of the Discover service. Over 180,000 articles including original research, review, perspective, and commentary articles are now fully enhanced and deep-indexed for improved discoverability across ReadCube’s web, desktop, and mobile reading portals; search engines; and personalized recommendation feeds.” (via ReadCube)

Leave a Comment

Wikipedia Is Basically a Corporate Bureaucracy, According to a New Study

“Wikipedia is a voluntary organization dedicated to the noble goal of decentralized knowledge creation. But as the community has evolved over time, it has wandered further and further from its early egalitarian ideals, according to a new paper published in the journal Future Internet. In fact, such systems usually end up looking a lot like 20th century bureaucracies.Even in the brave new world of online communities, the Who had it right: “Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.” (via Gizmodo)

Leave a Comment

The Next Librarian of Congress: History Has Its Eyes on Her

“In February 2016, President Barack Obama nominated Carla D. Hayden, CEO of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, for the open Librarian of Congress position–which has been temporarily filled by David S. Mao after James H. Billington retired in September 2015. … The first step to confirming Hayden’s nomination is approval by the U.S. Senate. This process began on April 20, with a hearing held by the U.S. Senate Committee on Rules and Administration.” (via Information Today)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2016, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.