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RARE SHAKESPEARE FOLIO DISCOVERED IN FRENCH TOWN

“An accidental discovery in a northern French library of an original first folio of Shakespeare’s plays – one of the rarest books in the world – has sent a jolt of excitement around the world of Shakespeare scholars.The 900-page tome was authenticated by a respected U.S.-based scholar over the weekend.The find brings the total of known first folios in the world to 233. It is significant as each first folio is a unique copy that can contain variations that can shed new light on the Shakespeare’s intentions.” (via Associated Press)

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Federal library struggling with backlog, key records poorly filed, auditor-general finds

The federal archival agency spent $15.4 million on a digital record system it never used, and shut it down shortly after it was tested, approved, and operational. That finding is one of numerous concerns uncovered by auditors examining Library and Archives Canada’s ability to keep up with its archival mandate in an increasingly digital world. Auditor General Michael Ferguson’s office found that Library and Archives received approval to build a “trusted digital repository” — a system for storing and preserving digital records — in 2006. After spending more than $15 million on the system, Library officials shuttered the project after it was completed in 2011.” (via Toronto Star)

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Detroit Public Library unveils remarkable digital collections

“Everything about a trip to the Main Branch of the Detroit Public Library (DPL) leaves a lasting impression — from the grand staircase of the building’s east wing to the murals and stained glass in Adam Strom Hall to the amazing collection of books and periodicals. Every Detroiter needs to visit this remarkable institution, which currently is celebrating its sesquicentennial. Now, however, many of the wonders of the DPL are available to you from the comforts of your own home. In October, a years-long digitization project culminated in the launch of the Digital Collections at the Detroit Public Library. Some of the library’s rarest, most intriguing documents and photos now can be accessed through the web. According to a recent newsletter from the library, “These online collections feature more than 67,000 images that have been digitized and cataloged for public use.” (via Model D Media.

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A Prize for the Piano Man

“Last Wednesday, the Library of Congress celebrated the music and career of singer-songwriter Billy Joel, awarding him the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. A star-studded cast walked a packed house at the DAR Constitution Hall through Joel’s own songbook during a tribute concert. I myself had the honor and privilege to also take the stage as a sort of “opening act” for Joel while performing with the Library of Congress Chorale. It was a once in a lifetime experience to be able to honor such a music legend.” (via LOC)

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Readers who Borrow e-Books from the Library Don’t Buy More Books

“Sometimes we get spoiled in North America with the sheer of amount of options available to borrow eBooks from the library. Statistically over 90% of all libraries in North America have a digital collection and patrons can access all of the content remotely. Things are different in the United Kingdom where only a few major libraries have bothered with a modern eBook collection. In May 2013 the UK government funded a review looking into the viability of allowing customers to borrow eBook, without all of the drama. The Sieghart Review said publishers should not limit the supply of e-books in the same way that physical book loans are controlled, including the lending of each digital copy to one reader at a time, securely removing eBooks after lending and having digital books “deteriorate after a number of loans”. (via Good eReader)

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The Tool That Helps You Search Every Page You’ve Ever Visited

“When his friend Kelly mentioned she was interviewing for a new job, Peter Brown told her there was an article she needed to read. He couldn’t remember where he’d seen it. And he couldn’t remember what company it was about. But he knew she had to read it. And, luckily, he had invented an app that could find it. Built for desktop and laptop machines, the app is called Fetching.io. It caches every single webpage you visit, creating your own personal search engine where you can search solely what you’ve seen in the past. Brown came up with the idea after trying—and failing—to find something else that did this. “I got sick and tired of losing websites I’d seen before—or spending a frustratingly long time re-finding them,” he says.” (via WIRED)

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Pittsburgh library displaying art from inmates

“Last February, Mary Carey received a letter at her job in Braddock’s Carnegie Library from a man serving a life sentence at the State Correctional Institution in LaBelle, Fayette County. He proposed organizing an exhibit of his fellow prisoners’ artwork as a contribution to the library’s art lending program. In his letter, Richard Guy, previously of Wilkinsburg, mentioned that he had read about the program and “mentioned it to a couple of my fellow inmates who are very good artists. My idea is to give these guys an avenue of creativity and to help the library out.” (via LancasterOnline)

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Chris Bourg named director of MIT Libraries

“Chris Bourg has been named as the new director of the MIT Libraries, effective in February. Provost Martin Schmidt announced her appointment today in an email to the MIT community. Bourg comes to MIT from Stanford University, where she is currently associate university librarian for public services. At Stanford, Bourg oversees the largest division of the Stanford University Libraries, with six branches and a collection of more than 4 million volumes.” (via MIT)

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At OER conference, speakers push for academic libraries to promote adoption

“Academic libraries can help promote the adoption of open educational resources, but ultimately the push for open content has to be about more than textbooks, advocates said this week during the Open Ed Conference. The conference, which concludes today, comes on the heels of two reports suggesting that adoption of OER has the potential to grow dramatically in the next three years — if faculty members are able to discover the resources they need.” (via insidehighered)

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Museum Catalogues from Eight Institutions You Can Now Read Online

“I’m pleased to ­share that all the museum partners in the Getty Foundation’s Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative (OSCI) have now published their catalogues — available to all, at no charge. The initiative recently reached this major milestone with the release of a free digital publication from Smithsonian’s Freer and Sackler Galleries. Going digital with collections catalogues required us at the Getty Foundation and our partners to completely rethink the ways museums create and share content about their collections. As a group, we tackled the challenges of online publishing by creating new models for scholarly catalogues in the online environment that we anticipate will be widely adopted.” (Getty Iris)

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