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README: Digital News from The New York Public Library

“We are excited to share the first issue of README, a new e-newsletter covering digital happenings from around The New York Public Library” (via NYPL)

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Announcing Amazon Inspire, a Free Service for Digital Educational Resources

“Today at ISTE 2016, Amazon announced Amazon Inspire, a free service for the search, discovery and distribution of digital educational resources. Developed in support of the company’s commitment to making digital classrooms a reality, Amazon Inspire, with its rich features such as search, discovery and peer reviews, will provide educators—regardless of funding or location—access to upload and share free digital teaching resources.” (via Amazon)

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Settlement reached in lawsuit over Alamo library items

“A group that served as guardian of the Alamo for more than a century and the Texas General Land Office reached a settlement Friday in a dispute over ownership of about 38,000 books and artifacts that had been kept at the Texas shrine.The Daughters of the Republic of Texas filed suit in March 2015 after the agency headed by George P. Bush declared the state owned the organization’s private library collection. Bush also had announced he was ending the group’s management of the downtown San Antonio landmark. The Daughters began caring for the Alamo in 1905, raised money in 1945 to build the library and then donated it to the state.” (via lancasteronline.com)

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Let European copyright catch up with reality

“This week, the Wikimedia Foundation submitted comments to the European Commission, urging them to recommend a clear and broad freedom of panorama that would allow people to share images of buildings, sculptures, and monuments that are permanently located in a public space. We also voiced our concerns about the new proposed neighboring right for publishers, which—oddly enough—was included in the same consultation.” (via Wikimedia blog)

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BROWSE FREE OR DIE? NEW HAMPSHIRE LIBRARY IS AT PRIVACY FORE

“A small library in New Hampshire sits at the forefront of global efforts to promote privacy and fight government surveillance – to the consternation of law enforcement.The Kilton Public Library in Lebanon, a city of 13,000, last year became the nation’s first library to use Tor, software that masks the location and identity of internet users, in a pilot project initiated by the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Library Freedom Project. Users the world over can – and do – have their searches randomly routed through the library.” (via The Associated Press)

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Library Cat Evicted: City Council Votes To Oust Library’s Mascot Of 5 Years Due To ‘Pettiness’

“A Texas city council has voted to evict a library cat.The library has been home to a light-grey tabby kitty named Browser for five years. The council ordered his eviction in a 2-to-1 vote, according to Fox News. The mayor of White Settlement says the council cites “pettiness” as the reason for Browser’s sudden eviction. According to Mayor Ron White, the cat’s eviction is based on city hall’s pettiness due to a city employee not being allowed to bring a puppy to work.” (via Inquisitr)

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Librarians share the lurid and macabre of downtown La Crosse

“A sunny afternoon took a sinister turn on Saturday during the Dark La Crosse trolley tour. Tales of murder, ghosts and prostitution gave patrons a taste of La Crosse’s more sordid history.Barry McKnight of the La Crosse Public Library’s Archives Department narrated the tour, intoning, “Our dark nature is everywhere. You can’t avoid it.”McKnight first directed the audience’s attention to the red-light district, located on Pearl Street from 1850 to 1915. Men traveling the Mississippi River in the lumber industry kept 40 to 50 brothels in business.” (via The Kansas City Star)

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ProQuest Expands Publisher Participation in Access-to-Own to Include Almost 400,000 Titles

“With its newest acquisition model launching next month, ProQuest has grown the number of titles available through Access-to-Own to almost 400,000 and dramatically increased publisher participation in just eight months. ProQuest developed Access-to-Own in collaboration with libraries and publishers around the world to provide a usage-based acquisition model that offers a balanced approach and a wider array of frontlist as well as backlist titles to libraries and the researchers they serve.” (via PR Newswire)

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See the Gutenberg Bible, 32,000 3D Mechanical Puzzles and a Lock of Edgar Allen Poe’s Hair at This Rare Library

“Only 48 copies of the Gutenberg Bible exist today, both in partial and full form. The book was the first major work produced on a printing press with movable type in 1455—and Indiana University’s Lilly Library in Bloomington, Indiana, has one of its own.The library itself is hidden on the Indiana University campus, tucked between one of the college’s theaters and an auditorium, about an hour south of Indianapolis in southern Indiana. Visitors to Bloomington typically go to see the city’s stunning architecture—it’s ranked 6th in the nation by the American Institute of Architects for architectural innovation and design—and the beautiful college that frequently ranks in the top 50 amazing campuses. But the Lilly Library is a hidden treasure, often elusive to visitors who have no idea of the wonders within.” (via )

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In defense of book collecting

“As of this writing there are 1,790 books in my apartment, some couple hundred in my campus office, and an unknown number floating about on loan to various friends and students. This represents a decrease of probably 20 percent from the height of my mania. Over the past few years, I have embarked on culling operations, boxing up hundreds of books and carting them to used bookstores. Spilling off shelves, piled in tottering stacks on every flat surface and a few angular ones, the books are snowing me under. Please do not think I make a habit of counting my books. I just did it for this piece, it took forever, and I do not intend ever to count even one book again.” (via Chicago Tribune)

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