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‘Simple and Seamless’ or ‘Significant Obstacle’?

“Academic, library and technology organizations are denouncing a new sharing and hosting policy adopted last month by publisher Elsevier, saying it undermines open-access policies at colleges and universities and prevents authors from sharing their work. Elsevier, which publishes thousands of journals, introduced the policy last month. It aims to strike a balance between making sharing “simple and seamless” and “being consistent with access and usage rights associated with journal articles,” the publisher said in a blog post.” (via Chronicle)

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Andreessens pair with H-P to send computers to Ferguson, Baltimore libraries

“Public libraries that provided a quiet refuge from civil unrest in Ferguson, Mo., and Baltimore are about to receive a small bounty from Silicon Valley. Venture capitalist Marc Andreessen and his wife, philanthropist and educator Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen, have teamed up with Hewlett-Packard to donate nearly $170,000 worth of computers, printers and other equipment. The couple says they were moved by the “individual acts of heroism” of library staffers who kept the doors open to the public even as protests raged over police brutality and the deaths of young black men.” (via USA Today)

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ALAMEDA COUNTY LIBRARY BOARD FINDS ALTERNATIVE TO TRASHING BOOKS

Public pressure is forcing the Alameda County Library system to stop throwing away thousands of books it deemed unusable. ABC7 News first reported this story back in February and our Facebook post on it got attention nationwide, with more than 76,000 people sharing this story with their Facebook friends. Some of the books thrown out were only three years old, but library officials say many of them simply weren’t being read so they had to be dumped. At a meeting Wednesday evening, the library advisory board decided it was a good idea to contract Discover Books — a non-profit that collects, resells or gives away the material. Regardless, book enthusiasts are still upset that an estimated 172,000 items were dumped in the trash.” (via ABC7News)

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Alma library bans e-cigarettes, companion pets

“The Alma Public Library is taking some proactive steps by banning two things from its building: e-cigarettes and companion pets. Both items, which are sort of “signs of our time” have in recent months brought up questions for both patrons and employees. Bryan Dinwoody, the director and librarian for the library said that as far as e-cigarettes were concerned, the board thought it best to be consistent. “We had some people asking if they could use (e-cigarettes) in the library, and it brought up a lot of issues as far as regulations,” he said. “There’s still a cloud produced; some people are sensitive to smells. It’s just not good for a public building.” (via The Morning Sun)

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hoopla digital Introduces Dynamic eBooks and Comics Experience

“Hoopla digital (hoopladigital.com), the category-creating mobile and online service for public libraries, today announced the rollout of its new eBooks and Comics offering to its library customers and their patrons in the U.S. and Canada. With thousands of titles at launch, hoopla’s eBooks and Comics selection features works across genres – from children’s books and comics to biographies and self-help – from publishers such as RosettaBooks, Chicago Review Press, Dundurn Press and Tyndale House Publishers. The eBooks and Comics content joins hoopla digital’s catalog of more than 300,000 movies, TV shows, music albums and audiobooks.” (via PR Newswire)

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Art is reported missing at Boston Public Library

“Police are investigating the disappearance of two works of art worth more than $600,000, including a print of a Rembrandt self-portrait, that went missing last month from the Boston Public Library’s flagship branch in Copley Square, authorities said Tuesday. A report from the Boston Police Department’s Anti-Corruption Unit states that officers learned in April that two prints, the one by Rembrandt and an Adam and Eve etching by Albrecht Dürer, were missing. The Dürer piece was valued at over $600,000, and the Rembrandt was worth between $20,000 and $30,000, according to police and library officials.” (via Boston Globe)

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Seattle library patrons can check out Wi-Fi hotspot devices

As of Monday, anyone with a Seattle Public Library card could check out a Wi-Fi hotspot device to use on the go or at home. The initial 150 devices were funded with a $225,000 grant from Google and Google.org to the Seattle Public Library, according to a library news release. “We want the library to be anywhere, everywhere, any place and on any device,” said Andra Addison, a spokeswoman for the library.” (via Seattle Times)

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Farrell named Clemson dean of libraries

“An administrator with degrees in library science, public administration and American studies has been named dean of libraries at Clemson University. Mary Margaret “Maggie” Farrell, dean of libraries at University of Wyoming since 2002, will join Clemson in mid-July. “As the libraries’ chief academic and administrative officer, Maggie will provide vision and leadership for the libraries and play an important role in Clemson’s 2020Forward plan,” said Bob Jones, Clemson executive vice president and provost. “Maggie’s exceptional talent and impressive track record are perfectly aligned with our needs and aspirations.” (via Clemson)

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A Grateful Dead missed connection? How a librarian scored a free ticket to ’95 Birmingham show

“On the evening of the 1995 Grateful Dead concert in Birmingham, Katie Moellering was shelving books. She was becoming increasingly disgruntled as she watched a stream of bright colors and happy faces pass through her view from inside the downtown Birmingham Public Library. A mere four blocks from the Birmingham Jefferson Civic Center, the library was a great place to watch Deadheads on their pilgrimage to the concert hall.” (via Al.com)

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Not Just Librarians Anymore: Jeffco’s DTLs are Leaders in a Digital Age

“The days of the dewey decimal system, card catalogs, and “Please Be Quiet” signs have long past for Jeffco Schools librarians. Today’s Digital Teacher Librarians (DTL’s), have very complex jobs where the focus is on student information literacy and technology. Books still form the core of their mission, but Jeffco DTL’s say the primary goal is to help students research, sift, and decipher information from a wide range of sources. They also have to ensure all the technology available to students and teachers, is in working order, and that library users are trained up on it.” (via Denver Post)

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