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Timmins Public Library reverses decision on boys-only robotics event after girl’s petition

“When nine-year-old Cash Cayen tried to sign up for a summer robotics session at the Timmins Public Library, she was told it was for boys only. So, with the help of her mom, she started a Change.org petition asking the library to let girls participate too — and it worked thanks to the public’s support. “She will be allowed in the program, as will any others wishing to take part,” Timmins Mayor Steven Black told Yahoo Canada News. The controversy began when Cash, an avid participant in local library activities, tried to sign up for a July 20 robotics event, but was turned away because of her gender.” (Via Yahoo)

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Colorado College plans $45 million expansion, renovation of library

“The “brain” of the Colorado College campus is on its way to becoming a lot smarter. Plans are advancing for a proposed $45 million expansion and renovation of Tutt Library at 1021 N. Cascade Ave. “It will become an academic hub and the brain of the campus, which is what an academic library is about,” said Brian Young, chief technology officer at CC and a member of the library renovation team.” (via The Gazette)

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Baltimore’s Enoch Pratt’s central library to get first major renovation

“When Baltimore’s grand library opened on Cathedral Street in 1933, the building’s ornate appointments and display windows were evocative of those in the department stores that lined nearby Howard Street. It also featured a street-level entrance and sprawling central hall that beckoned visitors inside. Unlike most city businesses of that era, the new building echoed benefactor Enoch Pratt’s vision that his pioneering lending library should warmly welcome everyone — “rich and poor without distinction of race or color.” (Via Baltimore Sun)

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Library card denied in 1942 now is hers

“Pearl Thompson was a college student in Raleigh in 1942 when she was told she couldn’t check out a book from the public library because she was black. She was sent to the library’s basement, where she had to wait for a staff member to bring her the book she was assigned to read for a history class at Shaw University. Blacks weren’t issued library cards, so she had to stay in the basement to read it. Seventy-three years later, at age 92, Thompson finally has her library card. Thompson, who now lives in Cincinnati, entered the Cameron Village Regional Library in Raleigh on Thursday, aided by a walker, to attend a ceremony in her honor.” (Via Dispatch.com)

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Ransom Center provides free online access to over 22,000 images of literary collections

The Ransom Center — UT’s world-recognized rare book and manuscript library — is removing the requirement for permission as well as use fees for a significant portion of its online collections that are in the public domain, the university announced today. Dubbed Project REVEAL (Read and View English and American Literature), the year-long initiative digitized 25 of the center’s manuscript collections of American and British literature of the 19th and early 20th centuries.” (Via Austin360)

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The New New York Public Library

“This is our moment!” said Tony Marx, the President and CEO of the New York Public Library (NYPL), as he was winding his comments about the present and future of libraries up to a crescendo: “Libraries are the central institution of civil society with the largest reach for everyone.” He continued with his carpe diem challenge that now is the time to work in a bigger way than ever before to scale up his library’s reach and to both preserve its long-held traditions and transform its offerings to suit the 21st century.” (via The Atlantic)

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Cuyahoga County library chief starts new chapter as president of American Library Association

Cuyahoga County Public Library Executive Director Sari Feldman has taken the reins of the American Library Association, the world’s oldest library association, where she will serve a one-year term as president. Feldman, who was elected last year and served a year as president-elect, immediately announced a new long-term public awareness campaign aimed at boosting funding for libraries of all kinds, from public libraries to school libraries. The campaign also will seek to increase advocacy on behalf of libraries on information policy issues such as net neutrality.” (Via Cleveland.com)

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PATTERSON ANNOUNCES FIRST ROUND OF GRANTS TO SCHOOLS

“James Patterson is announcing the first round of school libraries to receive grants from an initiative he and Scholastic Reading Club launched in March, and he continues to raise the amount of money he will donate. The best-selling and prolific author said Tuesday that $500,000 has been given to 127 schools, from Berryville Middle School in Arkansas to the Pierre Indian Learning Center in South Dakota. Individual grants range from $1,000 to $10,000, part of a program Patterson and Scholastic originally set at $1.25 million, but now stands at $1.75 million. On Tuesday, he committed an additional $250,000, the second time since March he raised funding by $250,000. An “overwhelming” volume of requests, more than 28,000, for books and other resources is behind the latest increase.” (Via AP)

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Coming soon to your St. Paul library: Data tracking

“Just about every week, Abe Alk steps up to the circulation desk at St. Paul’s Rondo Library with a big stack of movies. Documentaries are his favorite. “I have learned a lot of history from libraries, because sometimes I get like 12 DVDs,” he said. “So I am probably [their] No. 1 user.” Alk has been coming to this library since he moved to St. Paul three years ago. But the library knows almost nothing about him — probably just his name, his address and his birthday.” (via MPR)

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Huntington Library President Steven Koblik leaves with sense of pride

“Even in the home stretch of his 14-year run as president of the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, Steven Koblik was still learning on the job. Recently leading a visitor on a tour of some of his favorite things on the 207-acre spread in San Marino, Koblik began with the reading room where scholars writing books come from around the world to comb through manuscripts and rare books from the Huntington’s huge collections.” (via LA Times)

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