Archive | News RSS feed for this section

The Tool That Helps You Search Every Page You’ve Ever Visited

“When his friend Kelly mentioned she was interviewing for a new job, Peter Brown told her there was an article she needed to read. He couldn’t remember where he’d seen it. And he couldn’t remember what company it was about. But he knew she had to read it. And, luckily, he had invented an app that could find it. Built for desktop and laptop machines, the app is called Fetching.io. It caches every single webpage you visit, creating your own personal search engine where you can search solely what you’ve seen in the past. Brown came up with the idea after trying—and failing—to find something else that did this. “I got sick and tired of losing websites I’d seen before—or spending a frustratingly long time re-finding them,” he says.” (via WIRED)

Leave a Comment

Pittsburgh library displaying art from inmates

“Last February, Mary Carey received a letter at her job in Braddock’s Carnegie Library from a man serving a life sentence at the State Correctional Institution in LaBelle, Fayette County. He proposed organizing an exhibit of his fellow prisoners’ artwork as a contribution to the library’s art lending program. In his letter, Richard Guy, previously of Wilkinsburg, mentioned that he had read about the program and “mentioned it to a couple of my fellow inmates who are very good artists. My idea is to give these guys an avenue of creativity and to help the library out.” (via LancasterOnline)

Leave a Comment

Chris Bourg named director of MIT Libraries

“Chris Bourg has been named as the new director of the MIT Libraries, effective in February. Provost Martin Schmidt announced her appointment today in an email to the MIT community. Bourg comes to MIT from Stanford University, where she is currently associate university librarian for public services. At Stanford, Bourg oversees the largest division of the Stanford University Libraries, with six branches and a collection of more than 4 million volumes.” (via MIT)

Leave a Comment

At OER conference, speakers push for academic libraries to promote adoption

“Academic libraries can help promote the adoption of open educational resources, but ultimately the push for open content has to be about more than textbooks, advocates said this week during the Open Ed Conference. The conference, which concludes today, comes on the heels of two reports suggesting that adoption of OER has the potential to grow dramatically in the next three years — if faculty members are able to discover the resources they need.” (via insidehighered)

Leave a Comment

Museum Catalogues from Eight Institutions You Can Now Read Online

“I’m pleased to ­share that all the museum partners in the Getty Foundation’s Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative (OSCI) have now published their catalogues — available to all, at no charge. The initiative recently reached this major milestone with the release of a free digital publication from Smithsonian’s Freer and Sackler Galleries. Going digital with collections catalogues required us at the Getty Foundation and our partners to completely rethink the ways museums create and share content about their collections. As a group, we tackled the challenges of online publishing by creating new models for scholarly catalogues in the online environment that we anticipate will be widely adopted.” (Getty Iris)

Leave a Comment

Introducing The Oyster Review

“Editorial has always been a critical part of Oyster, from the very beginning when nearly our entire team stayed up late the night before launch curating lists to help our readers find the books they would love. Now we’re expanding that knowledge and passion for books with the launch of The Oyster Review, a new online publication from the editorial arm of Oyster.

We’re joining a rich history of literary conversation with a voice of our own, publishing original essays, reviews, humor pieces, and comics. If you’ve kept up with our Spotlight and Book of the Week features on this blog, you’ll now be able to find them over at The Oyster Review going forward. (Keep up with this blog for company news and events.)” (via Oyster HQ Blog)

Leave a Comment

Welcome Chronicle Books to Scribd

“We couldn’t be more pleased to welcome our friends (and neighbors) Chronicle Books to Scribd. They make some of the prettiest books around, and we’ve just added more than a thousand of them. Love gorgeous art & photography? Or sumptuously illustrated children’s books? How about some delicious, delicious food porn? Or maybe a great book to inspire you? We’ve got all those and more available to read right now.” (via The Scribd Blog)

Leave a Comment

Three Questions and Three Answers as Food for Thought About the Future of Wikipedia

“Wikipedia prides itself of being the encyclopedia of the 21st century. Except that in the 21st century there are no encyclopedias. Wikipedia has amazingly removed this category from the face of the earth. Since we already are the biggest, most updated, shared and common encyclopedia in the world – and mostly since we are virtually the only one left – this is the time to understand what our future holds. If we settle for the status quo and only try to preserve what we have, we will soon be left behind. If we really want to fulfill our vision and provide every single human being free access to the sum of all knowledge, we should ask ourselves – where is this knowledge?” (via Wikimedia blog)

Leave a Comment

UN, Wikimedia New York deliver open, free world maps on GIS Day

“For thousands of years, humans have used maps to define, understand and navigate the world in which we live. From cave drawings to star maps to geospatial navigation, maps have been an ever-improving tool for people everywhere. In today’s increasingly connected world, maps play a critical role in areas like humanitarian response to disasters, understanding the spread of disease, and much more. Like any information resource, however, maps vary in terms of accuracy and accessibility. The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) believes that accurate, reliable, and easy-to-understand maps should be available to everyone. That is why they’ve partnered with Wikimedia New York City and ReliefWeb to release a collection of more than 200 freely licensed “country-location” maps that are available on Wikimedia Commons and on the ReliefWeb site. In addition, many maps are also featured on Wikipedia country pages.” (via Wikimedia blog)

Leave a Comment

Publishers call for federal government to settle ‘fair use’ in higher education

“Publishers are seeking “corrective authoritative guidance” from the federal government to stop the trend of court rulings they say are expanding copyright exemptions beyond their legal intent, but higher education associations argue interfering could upset the balance between copyright holders and consumers. The Association of American Publishers made its appeal to a U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee on Wednesday during a hearing on fair use and access for the visually impaired. The second topic, however, was somewhat overshadowed by the ongoing legal disputes over what colleges and universities can and cannot do with copyrighted works.” (via insidehighered)

Leave a Comment

© Copyright 2014, Information Today, Inc., All rights reserved.