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EBSCO Information Services Introduces the Architectural Digest Magazine Archive™

“An extensive, searchable digital archive of the renowned design magazine Architectural Digest is now available from EBSCO Information Services. The Architectural Digest Magazine Archive™ includes cover-to-cover access to issues of the iconic and influential design magazine from the 1920s to 2011. Each issue in the Architectural Digest Magazine Archive is presented in its entirety, including the front and back covers and its high-quality photo spreads. All articles and advertisements have been indexed with subject terms to allow users to find relevant results quickly, as well as research and analyze trends in topics and advertising materials. With over 90 years’ worth of issues available, the Architectural Digest Magazine Archive is a valuable resource for everyday design enthusiasts, researchers of architecture and interior design and those interested in the history of business, advertising and popular culture.” (via EBSCO)

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Washington Park could have edge for Obama library

“In the site-selection derby for the Barack Obama Presidential Center on Chicago’s South Side, Washington Park, surrounded by a gritty neighborhood, may have the edge over the more glamorous lakefront location of Jackson Park.That, at least, is the view of New York architecture critic Paul Goldberger, who is advising the Barack Obama Foundation as President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama begin interviewing the seven architectural firms vying for the coveted commission.” (via Chicago Tribune)

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Wikimedia Foundation removes The Diary of Anne Frank due to copyright law requirements

“Today, in an unfortunate example of the overreach of the United States’ current copyright law, the Wikimedia Foundation removed the Dutch-language text of The Diary of a Young Girl—more commonly known in English as the Diary of Anne Frank—from Wikisource.[1]We took this action to comply with the United States’ Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), as we believe the diary is still under US copyright protection under the law as it is currently written. Nevertheless, our removal serves as an excellent example of why the law should be changed to prevent repeated extensions of copyright terms, an issue that has plagued our communities for years.” (via Wikimedia blog)

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The new (and much improved) ‘Bluebook’ caught in the copyright cross-hairs

“War is brewing over the most boring piece of intellectual property imaginable: the “Bluebook,” the 580-page quasi-authoritative source of proper legal citation formats published by the Harvard Law Review, described by Adam Liptak of the New York Times a few months ago as “a comically elaborate thicket of random and counterintuitive rules about how to cite judicial decisions, law review articles and the like [that] is both grotesque and indispensable.” (via The Washington Post)

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Indiana at 200: Carnegie libraries distinguish Indiana’s intellectual landscape

“They are the libraries that Andrew built. In the early 20th century, Andrew Carnegie funded the establishment of public libraries across the United States in an effort to bring the joy of reading and learning – free of charge – to the masses.To Hoosiers’ great benefit, Indiana received more Carnegie grants than any other state, $2.6 million in all, enough to build 164 libraries in 155 cities and towns from 1901 to 1922.” (via News-Sentinel.com)

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Grab a Book From This Floating Library on Echo Park Lake

“Visitors to Echo Park Lake know that the space is perfect for soaking in the sun, gazing at beautiful water lilies and — if you’re feeling especially adventurous on any given day — renting a pedal boat to spend some time on the water. The little vessels serve as temporary escapes, offering a chance to navigate something besides jam-packed highways and busy city streets.Hoping to lure even more Angelenos onto the water, artist Sarah Peters will use Echo Park Lake as the space for a project that got its start in Minnesota. Working with local arts organization Machine Project, Peters brings us “The Floating Library,” a creative undertaking that’s exactly what it sounds like.” (via L.A. Weekly)

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Hoopla Announces Deal with Ingram

“Library service provider Hoopla Digital today announced a new agreement with Ingram through which publishers working with Ingram’s CoreSource Plus digital distribution service can offer public library patrons instant access to their titles via hoopla digital’s app and online service. Officials at hoopla say that inclusion of CoreSource titles will significantly broaden their catalog of more than 400,000 movies, TV shows, music albums, e-books, audiobooks and comics.” (via PW)

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92% of college students prefer print books to e-books, study finds

“If you imagine millennials are just young people entranced by their cellphones or tablet computers, you might want to think again. According to a new study, 92% of college students would rather do their reading the old-fashioned way, with pages and not pixels.The finding comes from American University linguistics professor Naomi S. Baron, author of the book “Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World.” Baron led a team that asked 300 college students in the United States, Slovakia, Japan and Germany how they preferred to read.” (via LA Times)

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Queens Library goes after ex-CEO for $200G

“Didn’t he have a library card? The ex-CEO of the Queens Library expensed books he bought on Amazon for his Kindle, the library says in court papers.The library filed the complaint about Thomas Galante in a countersuit to recover hundreds of thousands of dollars in personal expenses and legal fees it forked over to the ousted executive, the Daily News has learned.” (via NY Daily News)

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Deb Fallows on The Local Library

“As we traveled around the U.S. reporting on the revival of towns and cities, we always made the local library an early stop. We’d hit the newspaper offices, the chamber of commerce, city hall, and Main Street for an introduction to the economics, politics, and stresses of a town. The visit to the public library revealed its heart and soul.The traditional impression of libraries as places for quiet reading, research, and borrowing books—and of librarians as schoolmarmish shush-ers—is outdated, as they have metamorphosed into bustling civic centers. For instance, Deschutes Public Library in Bend, Oregon, now cooperates with dozens of organizations, from AARP (which helps people with their taxes) to Goodwill (which teaches résumé writing). A social worker trains staff to guide conversations about one of the most frequent questions people trustingly bring into the library: Can you help me figure out how to meet my housing costs?” (via The Atlantic)

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