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When it comes to city services, San Antonians love their library

The San Antonio Public Library earned a 96 percent customer satisfaction rating from local residents, according to the latest community survey conducted by independent consulting firm ETC Institute. Patrons ranked the public library the highest in overall service among all the services offered by the City of San Antonio. At 96 percent, the library system ranked higher overall in customer satisfaction compared with the national average.” (via )

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‘Closed to theft’: All children’s books taken from ‘little free libraries’ in Davison front yard

“Residents in a cozy residential neighborhood off M-15 are trying to figure out why someone would take all the children’s books from two little free libraries off M-15 in Davison. 

Kim Carter said she left her Juniper Drive home around 5 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27 and came back a few hours later to discover the nearly 50 books in the library sitting on a bench in her front yard were all gone. “I was horrified,” said Carter, trying to grasp the thinking behind someone removing all the books. Typical users will borrow a book or keep one and it replace it with another read.” (via MLive.com)

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Double Life: On-call librarian is also artist and musician

“If you have ever called a library’s after-hours number with a question, the person on the other end of the line could have been Carrboro artist and musician Phil Blank.Blank runs a company called ChatStaff, which provides after-hours service to libraries all over North Carolina and beyond. But he’s also a painter, illustrator and accordion player for a local klezmer band, Gmish.In fact, you might have seen his paintings on the walls at Orange County Social Club or his illustrations on the new bags of Larry’s Beans’ single origin coffee now on shelves at Earth Fare, Whole Foods or Weaver Street Market stores. And you might have heard his music while wandering in downtown Carrboro and stumbling upon a klezmer band busking on a street corner.” (via The State)

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Library of Congress cooks CDs in quest to save them

“CDs may not be the first thing to come to mind when you think of the Library of Congress, but it houses more than 500,000. The extensive collection includes everything from music to maps and labs where researchers are destroying CDs to learn how to preserve them, CBS News’ Jim Axelrod reports. In 1982, Billy Joel’s album “52nd Street” was the first commercial compact disc to be released. Since then, hundreds of billions of CDs have been sold worldwide.” (via CNET)

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Of books, trees, and knowledge

To Ling Guo, a curator for the Beijing Botanic Garden, one of the best places to learn about Chinese crab apples is half a world away, in Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum Horticultural Library. Guo was wrapping up two months at the Arboretum as a visiting scientist and a recipient of the Jewett Prize, which supports researchers studying flowers and fruits. Guo, one of the world’s foremost experts on crab apples, has been creating an updated checklist of all the world’s varieties for use by her home institution as it takes over the rotating role managing the international crab apple registry, which helps monitor and assign names for new varieties.” (via Harvard Gazette)

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D.C. adds a social worker to library system to work with homeless patrons

“Among the many roles for which public libraries are appreciated, there’s one that can be problematic: de facto day shelter for homeless people. Downtown’s Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library attracts many such patrons, and Jean Badalamenti understands why. “The city drops folks from three shelters off here every morning and picks them up in the evening. So they come here because of that,” said Badalamenti, a social worker who in May became the D.C. Public Library’s first health and human services coordinator.” (via The Washington Post)

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Rocky Mountain Gun Owners vs. small town library?

“It’s shaping up to be a small town showdown straight out of an old West tale: gun-rights group Rocky Mountain Gun Owners is threatening to wage a legal battle on its own turf against the Clearview Library District in Windsor, where RMGO is also based.The dust-up was spurred when librarians asked mother Erika Sattler to leave the Windsor-Severance Library after another patron noticed Sattler’s concealed handgun. Librarians apparently advised Sattler that guns are prohibited at the library unless being carried by law enforcement. Sattler gathered up her children and departed, but while she may have lost the battle RMGO has rallied to help her win the war.” (via The Colorado Independent)

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A Brooklyn Librarian Will Now Make You a Personalized Reading List, and You Don’t Even Have to Put on Pants

“This has been, without a doubt, an excellent summer for New York’s libraries. In Manhattan, the Stephen A. Schwartzman branch set up a beautiful outdoor reading room that was open for the past two weeks before closing on the 22nd. A group of seafaring booklovers announced that they’ll launch a floating library aboard the Lilac Museum Steamship for a month come September. And now, in a less temporary and totally genius move, a group of hardworking librarians across the Brooklyn Public Library system will make you a personalized reading list. You don’t have to leave the house, dress yourself, or talk to another human being to put in a request for one. The future is here, and it is glorious.” (via Village Voice)

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Vancouver’s main library to undergo major reorganization

“Vancouver’s downtown library — a nine-storey “Colosseum” that holds 1.3 million items and covers a full block at Georgia and Homer — is approaching its 20th anniversary, and with that will come some significant changes. The downtown branch, which is known as the Central Library, is being rearranged to make it easier for people to find books, as well as to create space for a new Inspiration Lab.” (via Vancouver Sun)

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George Washington U. clarifies ‘no alternative textbook vendor’ guidelines

“Faculty members at George Washington University are once again free to tell students they can save money by buying their textbooks online, after the university initially urged professors to stop pointing students to sources other than the campus bookstore. In a letter dated July 17, the university reminded faculty members of its “contractual obligation” with Follett, which runs the campus bookstore. Since the company has the “exclusive right” to provide textbooks and other course materials for all of the university’s courses, “alternative vendors may not be endorsed, licensed or otherwise approved or supported by the university or its faculty.” (via insidehighered)

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