Library computers can block porn—but Wicca? ACLU says no

Law and Disorder – “I work on occasion from my local public library, a wonderful spot with huge glass windows overlooking an attached park. The views are nice, the quiet is terrific, but the free Wi-Fi is indispensable. But the Internet connectivity comes with limits, in the form of a content filter that periodically prevents me from accessing research materials. Infuriating, yes. But illegal? The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has just filed a complaint (PDF) on behalf of a Salem, Missouri resident named Anaka Hunter, who contends that the Salem public library is unconstitutionally blocking her ability to access information on “minority” religious views. Federal and state law both govern libraries in Missouri, which are generally ordered to block access to obscene online material and child pornography. But the Salem library allegedly goes far beyond the mandate.”

2 Responses to “Library computers can block porn—but Wicca? ACLU says no”

  1. Dan Kleinman of SafeLibraries
    January 3, 2012 at 10:12 pm #

    If I am not mistaken, this may be the first case since US v. ALA was decided in 2003 to directly file an “as applied” CIPA challenge. I have reached out to both the ACLU of Eastern Missouri and the ACLU to offer my assistance in this matter. Who knows, it might help to have a sort of bipartisan opposition to the blocking of religious web sites, etc.

  2. Kentucky Homeschoolers
    January 9, 2012 at 1:38 am #

    I believe the problem is with the software, its just not efficient enough at actually filter the content. It’s too aimed at keywords.

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