Albert Ellis, R.I.P.

NYT: “Albert Ellis, whose streamlined, confrontational approach to psychotherapy made him one of the most influential and provocative figures in modern psychology, died early today at his home in an apartment above the institute he founded Manhattan. He was 93. The cause was kidney and heart failure, said a friend and associate, Gayle Rosellini.”

I studied Ellis’s theories while getting my Masters in Psychology. While a bit brash, I was turned on by his no nonsense approach to therapy. But then, I read Man’s Search for Meaning (MSFM) and was blown away by Frankl. MSFM is my bible and use the techniques everyday when dealing with work or personal issues.

Sad to hear about Ellis passing away.

2 Responses to “Albert Ellis, R.I.P.”

  1. The Board of Trustees and the staff of the Albert Ellis Institute issued the following statement:

    We are deeply saddened by the passing of Dr. Albert Ellis – a true pioneer and visionary. We join the many thousands of people around the world who mourn his passing and whose lives he enriched and benefited. Dr. Ellis will be remembered not only as one of the most influential psychotherapists in history, but as a man of passion, brilliance and abiding commitment.

    We pledge to continue the important work he began more than a half-century ago.
    Dr. Ellis entered the field of clinical psychology after earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in business from the City University of New York. He completed his Master of Arts in clinical psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University. After receiving his Ph.D. in 1947, and breaking from traditional psychoanalysis, Dr Ellis developed the theory of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT), an approach that stresses actively challenging individual’s self-defeating beliefs and behaviors and replacing them with healthier alternatives.

    Over the years, Dr. Ellis’ approach has been adopted by leading mental health practitioners around the world. Dr. Ellis’ work remains at the center of the Institute’s mission.

  2. Edana
    July 24, 2007 at 7:44 pm #

    I read MSFM in high school and still keep a copy close by. There’s one in my desk drawer right now. Amazing book!

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