A Pornographers Guide to Protecting Kids from Porn Online

I guess I should start this post with the following:

My views on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of my employer or my sponsor. Any issues about this or any other post should be addressed to me and only me.

One of my favorite non-librarian blogs is SugarBank, a site about the business of sex and porn industry. Some of the content on this site is not for the faint of heart (fair warning). I like it because the blogger (Sam Sugar) is brutally honest, an incredible writer, and most of the time, fascinating.

Today, Sugar tackles the vitriolic subject of protecting kids from online porn. Librarians who deal with this on a daily basis (and I must admit I do not envy you), should take a look. Also, with Hallie starting to use her new computer, I, as a parent, read this closely. In one of the best pieces about the post, Sugar states:

“The world is a reasonably safe place for most adults and a treacherous place for an unaccompanied child. The online world is the same and parenting doesn’t stop at the power switch.”

“An unattended kid playing with Lego in the living room is inside; an unattended kid watching TV or surfing the Internet is mentally wandering around outside alone. If they’re too young to go out alone, they’re too young to be online alone.”

“It’s an awkward idea. If the one-eyed babysitter isn’t an option, keeping kids occupied is more complicated than letting them surf, but parenting works. The company of a guardian is as effective at keeping kids away from the inappropriate parts of the net as it is at keeping them out of bars and clubs offline.”

Whether you agree with him or not, the problem of kids and pornography will be prevalent for a long time to come. Education is key, and openness to new ideas is important to understanding the consequences

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