MIT Libraries supporting Open Library of Humanities

“The MIT Libraries have joined the Open Library of Humanities’ (OLH), an academic-led, all open access publisher of humanities journals. The platform, which has funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, covers its costs by payments from an international library consortium, rather than any kind of author fee. The platform hosts peer-reviewed open access journals in the humanities, as well as OLH’s own multidisciplinary open access journal.” (via MIT Libraries News)

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Google’s New Interactive E-Books Would Be Impossible to Print

“There was a moment when e-books felt a little bit magical. A single device that stores hundreds of books, fits in a tote, and doesn’t give paper cuts? Clearly, this was an upgrade to the tattered paper books we’d been reading for hundreds of years. Then, some years and a few generations of Kindle later, digital books began to feel less like magic and more like pixelated versions of what’s already on our shelves. Being digital didn’t necessarily add anything to the reading experience. In fact, it was physical books that seemed to be pushing the boundaries of publishing.” (via Wired)

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National Library of Medicine Announces MedPix®, Free Online Medical Image Database

“The National Library of Medicine is pleased to announce the launch of MedPix®, a free online medical image database originally developed by the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at the Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. The URL is https://medpix.nlm.nih.gov/. The foundation for MedPix was a radiology study tool that was originally developed by Dr. J.G. Smirniotopoulos in 1984.” (via National Library of Medicine)

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Falling Canadian dollar raises longstanding issue of journal costs

“Academic libraries strive to provide their university’s faculty, researchers and students with broad access to international scholarship, recognizing that reported research is the critical starting point to inform new research, which in turn leads to new knowledge that advances science, culture and society. Much of the world’s research is reported in articles published in journals, most of which are accessed online by subscription.” (via CARL-ABRC)

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Students, librarians urge professors to use free, online textbooks

“student advocacy group, along with one of the University of Washington’s top librarians, is urging faculty members to take a good look at using more free online textbooks.And two bills in the state Legislature would promote and facilitate the use of such open-source textbooks and course materials.”(via The Seattle Times)

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Penguin Random House eBook Titles Now Available on EBSCO eBooks

“EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) has partnered with Penguin Random House to offer digital libraries the entire collection of Penguin Random House eBooks through EBSCO eBooks™.  Libraries can access 21,000 fiction and nonfiction e-book titles from prominent authors including John Grisham, Mindy Kaling, Paula Hawkins, Toni Morrison and Danielle Steel.” (via EBSCO)

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Saskatoon libraries offer ‘blind dates’ with books for Valentine’s Day

“In honour of Valentine’s Day, Saskatoon Public Library is offering patrons a chance to head out on a “blind date” with a book. Displays have been set up at branches allowing brave readers to meet mysterious literary strangers.”What we do is wrap up books in interesting wrapping paper so you can’t tell what title of the book is,” explained Theressa Slind, adult collections librarian at Frances Morrison Central Library.”They also have a description of the book, just dropping a few hints on the book itself,” said Slind.” (via CBC News)

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Beyond search: Enabling serendipity in research discovery

“Researchers often find and retrieve the content they need through carefully planned searches — but what about less structured, unexpected instances of scholarly discovery? A new two-part white paper out today by SAGE Publishing explores the common researcher experiences that lead to “chance” discoveries as well as opportunities for information professionals to support and encourage serendipity in academic research.” (via SAGE Publications Inc)

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The Hong Kong Bookseller Who’s Keeping ‘Banned’ Books On His Shelves

“In Hong Kong’s densely packed Causeway Bay district, a red sign with a portrait of Chairman Mao looms over the bustling storefronts and shoppers. The sign indicates that there is coffee, books and Internet on offer inside.Customers go past a window where travelers can exchange foreign currencies, up a narrow staircase and into a room stacked high with books. The walls are painted red, and decked out with 1960s Cultural Revolution propaganda posters and other Mao-era memorabilia. The aroma of coffee and the sound of jazz waft over the book-browsing customers.” (via NPR)

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Amazon Plans Hundreds of Brick-and-Mortar Bookstores, Mall CEO Says

“After dipping its toes into brick-and-mortar retailing last year with its first physical bookstore, online giant Amazon.com Inc. is poised to dive into the deep end. The Seattle company plans to open as many as 400 bookstores, Sandeep Mathrani, chief executive of mall operator General Growth Properties Inc., said on an earnings call on Tuesday. “You’ve got Amazon opening brick-and-mortar bookstores and their goal is to open, as I understand, 300 to 400,” said Mr. Mathrani in response to a question about mall traffic.” (via WSJ)

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